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The loop inside of the musette bag


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The reason the shoulder strap was detachable was to allow the bag to be hung from the sword frog loops on the British pattern Sam Browne belt, or the D-rings on the belt of a trench coat.

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Every musette bag was issued with the carrying strap the loop is were the carrying strap is stored when used with the suspenders?

 

I always understood the strap was to be stored in the small pouch on the side.

 

Ray

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I always understood the strap was to be stored in the small pouch on the side.

 

Ray

 

 

I believe that's were a can of C-Rations are store.

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An open-ended loop would not be used to store items that would easily fall out of either end. A design like this suggests something that passes through the loop or that could be reasonably secure there, like the strap or a flashlight with a safety clip. (A long shot guess would be for an alternate belt mount option that allows the flap to be routed behind and over the belt?)

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  • 4 weeks later...

The reason the shoulder strap was detachable was to allow the bag to be hung from the sword frog loops on the British pattern Sam Browne belt, or the D-rings on the belt of a trench coat.

 

Any pictures around of alternative wear (not the strap) of a musette bag?

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Ok, don't hit me if this has already been mentioned, but I have also heard it was to allow a chinstrap (such as on the M1917A1) to pass through (with the helmet resting on the outside of the flap) when not worn. However, I have only seen helmets secured in a very similar manner on the gas mask, during the 1930s and early 1940s; never on a musette. But I suppose it is possible...

 

RC

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so far ...to me...the one operational use, that makes sense is using the loop as a suspension hanger...when in the field ...running a pole through it ...maybe at the end of a cot, and using the bag as storage ...all is speculation, from what I have read on the thread, there is no definitive description of the loop's use

This is like the hook sewn on the nylon flight helmet bag....

 

the bags that I found, that have the shoulder strap, I found the strap in the side pocket, never rolled up an stowed in the loop...not saying it did not happen

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It is important to keep in mind that there would have been the one 'officially-sanctioned' use the designers had in mind, and many other uses which soldiers/veterans could have used it for. If you have heard (or do hear) of an account in which it is used by at least someone (such as the 1930s helmet use related above), it is still worth adding to the thread in my humble opinion, since it is at least something it was used for at some point; even if it is not what it was intended for.

 

RC

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Cap Camouflage Pattern I

Ok, don't hit me if this has already been mentioned, but I have also heard it was to allow a chinstrap (such as on the M1917A1) to pass through (with the helmet resting on the outside of the flap) when not worn. However, I have only seen helmets secured in a very similar manner on the gas mask, during the 1930s and early 1940s; never on a musette. But I suppose it is possible...

 

RC

But the m1917 chinstrap doesn't have a buckle, so there would be no way to do this back in 1918, but the bag still had the loop in 1918

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But the m1917 chinstrap doesn't have a buckle, so there would be no way to do this back in 1918, but the bag still had the loop in 1918

 

Yes, I am not talking about what it was designed for, but one of the things I have heard it used for; along with the era I have heard it used that way. See my post above #59..

 

It is important not to lose or ignore knowledge of other uses, while we try to figure out what it was actually designed for.

 

RC

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Any pictures around of alternative wear (not the strap) of a musette bag?

 

Here are two photos I found online of a museum display and a collector's setup. I will do my best to find a period photograph.

 

post-101332-0-00833200-1485588297.jpg

 

post-101332-0-59660300-1485588297.jpg

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It took some doing, but I found some period photographs showing how the ancestor to the US musette bag was originally worn. Here is the first, more to follow.

 

Officers of D Company, 2nd Worcestershire Regiment, on maneuvers, 1914.

 

post-101332-0-70242900-1485726952_thumb.jpg

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But the m1917 chinstrap doesn't have a buckle, so there would be no way to do this back in 1918, but the bag still had the loop in 1918

M1917A1 kelly helmet does have a buckle.

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M1917A1 kelly helmet does have a buckle.

what he means is that wouldnt be the designated use as the musette bag had them in 1918 when the 1917a1 didnt come around until 1939-ish. before that helmets had a single strap and couldnt be used with the loop

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Hi guys,


I should have been clearer with my intent when I posted reply #57 and #59. My thoughts were that if we also consider anecdotal evidence from the WWII-era, which I should have clarified, but I had thought the mention of M1917A1 helped to keep that in context. Anyway, documenting any first-hand accounts might give some idea of at least what the loop has been used for, over the years. I would guess that if you had 100 or 1,000 WWII veterans to ask, they would tell you they don't ever remember using it. So that is why I consider the few accounts or 'word of mouth' anecdotes worth preserving, since a few guys did find some use for it, even if not official. And so far, we can't think of many uses for it, so it is interesting to hear what it has been used for (by veterans). :) Much like the side pouch; I have heard at least one guy indicate he kept his shaving kit in it, but I doubt that was it's intended use. Sorry for the confusion.

The only 'Official' use, will be that found in writing someplace. It would be quite funny, if they had added it as a helpful loop for something, which was never specified. :lol:

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Edward, Prince of Wales, as an officer of the Grenadier Guards. (Note haversack hanging from Sam Browne Belt over sword)

post-101332-0-69928800-1485742050_thumb.jpg

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Another photograph of Edward, Prince of Wales, at the head of a column of troops. Both he and the other officer both wear the haversack hanging from the belt.

post-101332-0-08304800-1485742239_thumb.jpg

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I wasn't talking about 1918, but it is interesting to see the speculation about the bag's British origin. Since we're talking about the m1936, i thought the kelly and it's buckle might make sense, but you're right, it came out much later. I'm actually a bit surprised they didn't modernize that helmet design until so late.

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Here's the small USMC NCO's haversack circa 1920. It has the loop inside but it is very small in diameter compared to the Army version. I can just get my finger inside of it.

 

mm1.JPG

mm2.JPG

mm4.JPG

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Robin,

 

That's tight. I guess that knocks out the mess utensils since the leather sheath won't fit.

 

RC

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  • 2 months later...

Hi,
I found this 82nd photo somewhere showing what looks like an entrenching tool handle through the top of a musette bag in the lower right of the photo.... just another idea. Cheers, John

post-105780-0-97830800-1493203238_thumb.jpg

post-105780-0-28474700-1493203495.jpg

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