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The loop inside of the musette bag


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looks like a pick mattock handle ...

 

...and it is probably pushed through the under the flap, but not the loop.

 

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ParanormalTrooper

I don't know if it's been brought up before, but the USMC officers m1936 shoulder bag doesnt have the loop, which honestly makes me think the loop is for suspenders.

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I don't know if it's been brought up before, but the USMC officers m1936 shoulder bag doesnt have the loop, which honestly makes me think the loop is for suspenders.

 

How do you expalin Post #72 then?

Your comparing apples and oranges, what needs to be regonized here and focused on is the year 1918 !!! multiple times in this topic WWII comparisons surfaced, it is actually irrelevant to the identification of its intended purpose.

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"What needs to be regonized here and focused on is the year 1918 !!! multiple times in this topic WWII comparisons surfaced, it is actually irrelevant to the identification of its intended purpose".

 

Hi,

 

if the loop was in the musette bag back then and it started as an officer's bag I can only think of one item that an officer might carry that needed a holder when not held in the hand....maybe the loop was for a swagger stick? I know it is larger that really needed for a swagger stick, but it's an idea......

 

cheers, John

 

post-105780-0-59510300-1493271901.jpg

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Ok, maybe not for a swagger stick, I can't find one photo of a WW1 US officer holding a swagger stick.

Cheers, John

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Yikes... a loop of that kind in that location, simply cannot have been put there incidentally.

 

Have we gone into the manufacturer(s) specs?

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iron bender

I'm in agreement that the loop is there for hanging the bag from a rope or rod/pole while still being able to open the bag. For example in a stand up locker, transport ship, or in a fixed position. I have zero photographic or written evidence, but this would be my way way wild guess. I recall as a kid for the longest time not being able to figure the leather strap on the cover of German tornisters manufactured post 1940, then it dawned on me all these packs had d-rings for the a-frame, so the leather strap held the a-frame in place on the flap.

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Flightpath

Nice swagger stick! General Buckner? Thanks for sharing.

Got the photo from Ebay (352043559975) it is still there.

Cheers, John

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  • 3 months later...

I was just reading through the book Sailors in Forest Green and they had a top down picture into an M1936 musette bag showing a folding tent pole in the loop. Looked perfect in place and was covered by the flap when it was down. Makes complete sense as well.

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phantomfixer

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/1586-musette-bags-m1921-m1936/page-2

 

A much older thread discussing the inner loop, 2007, the M1936 derived from the M1921 which is based on the WWI design of French/UK origins...

 

It states the M1921 had the inner loop, but does not clearly state if the French or UK designs had the inner loop..

 

There is no US issued mussette bag during WWI...according to the thread, if I read it correctly..

the inner loop might or might not have European design origins...

 

if used for storage...the item stored would be something that needed to be found right away(?) used often(?) Candle, flashlight, toothbrush/hygiene kit

 

Still think it was for suspension...with the flap folded over ...

 

Post #37 on the link makes a valid point...the loop remained for 24 years...it could have been dropped for lack of necessity during that time...and during the war years for sure...with material shortages etc...when the equipment flap was added in 44, some thought was put into the design, yet the loop remained, I doubt if that was on oversight...

 

SO IMO whatever the loop was for it was important enough to remain part of the production process

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I just found a mussette bag and there was a Falstaff beer can opener stuck in the loop...:D

 

Priority and necessary item right at hand for quick use..

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SO IMO whatever the loop was for it was important enough to remain part of the production process

That ^ seems to me to be the key fact.

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  • 1 year later...

More unhelpful information about the loop. We all know the loop in the US musette bag was copied from the British officer's musette of WWI. However, I've learned that loop goes back even further. I just acquired an issue haversack from the Boer War. The loop is present in that one, and the haverack was standard issue to every Tommy, not just officers. So you have to think 19th Century, and something every soldier would have, for an answer to its original purpose.

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WWII Parachutist

Have we gone into the manufacturer(s) specs?

I pulled out my original copy and unfortunately it does not help...simply called "LOOP" in the specification drawings. No more, no less. Dated November 25, 1940

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So there I was reading this interesting topic with a lot of ideas presented, such as the bag being an officers item and an officer normally is armed with a pistol. I had my own idea that if I am an officer carrying a musette bag and I am also armed with an M1911 pistol, what might I need from my bag quickly at hand. After a bit of what if's, I thought how about a couple of extra loaded magazines for my pistol in an emergency. So I tried a test and in the image you see that two loaded magazines, side by side fit in the loop like a glove. I have no documentation or any other information to prove this theory, just a retired Engineers idea about what I might want in that loop if I was in combat armed with a pistol. As always, any comments are welcome.

 

Bob

post-299-0-03514700-1544042039_thumb.jpg

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BTW. When I said "fits like a glove", the mags were snug enough to stay in the loop by themselves, yet could be quickly pulled out for immediate use without much effort. So what I would say as a perfect fit for this purpose.

 

Bob

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Don't know the expertise of this gentleman, but go to 3:24 in the video take from YouTube.

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I just watched the musette bag video and decided to do a test on slipping a collapsible tent pole unit into the loop. No way will the whole assemble fit inside the loop. I could only get one pole section to fit into the loop leaving the other two sections flapping free. I also don't like the way the pole unit overlaps the sides of the bag. I also tried the OD three section tent poles and I could only get two pole sections under the loop at the same time. They fit snug enough that they were held in place nicely, but what was done with the third pole? I am sorry but I just don't buy that tent pole explanation, unless I am using the wrong tent poles in my test. Comments??

 

Bob

post-299-0-48498000-1544065155_thumb.jpg

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I was digging through mystuff and found a 1941 dated musette bag that belonged to Col. Herb Smith, the guy that led the 126th fellows over the Owen Stanleys to attack Buna. The bag has a strap attached to the clips but what is most interesting is in the loop in question appears to be the original strap that came with the bag. It is a perfect fit and in the attached pictures you can see there is really no slop in the loop. I have never taken it out but the one on the pask is dated 1942.

post-3384-0-16273600-1544377380_thumb.jpg

post-3384-0-70824700-1544377390_thumb.jpg

 

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I was digging through mystuff and found a 1941 dated musette bag that belonged to Col. Herb Smith, the guy that led the 126th fellows over the Owen Stanleys to attack Buna. The bag has a strap attached to the clips but what is most interesting is in the loop in question appears to be the original strap that came with the bag. It is a perfect fit and in the attached pictures you can see there is really no slop in the loop. I have never taken it out but the one on the pask is dated 1942.

attachicon.gif20181117_150225 (2).jpg

attachicon.gif20181117_150253 (2).jpg

 

I think bheskett has nailed it spot on. It makes perfect sense - a place to put the strap when it wasn't needed. It wouldn't surprise me if they left the factory like that packed in boxes.

 

Steve

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