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Post The Patch Type Crest Being Worn.

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Infantry School DUI being worn on the beret of the Command Sergeant Major of the Ranger Training Brigade at Fort Benning

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Wasn't it the Infantry School DI that came first and the shoulder patch was then based on the metal/enameled DI?

 

Yes it was.

http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Heraldry/ArmyDUISSICOA/ArmyHeraldryUnit.aspx?u=7009

 

Yes, I knew that. And technically they are not exactly the same since the DUI has a silver border around the blue shield while the shield of the SSI is solid blue. But for all intents and purposes they are the same. And in my opinion, the Infantry School SSI is one of the nicest looking in the Army. Not too elaborate but very classy.

 

But also notice on the link you posted that below the SSI and DUI it shows the same insignia referred to as a "Device" and says that was originally approved in 1922. I'm not really sure what "Device" means in that context. Maybe it was just used for signs, letterhead, etc. before the actual insignia was worn

 

By the way, this is the DUI that I believe preceded the current one. However, I'm not sure if it was ever officially authorized since the Institute of Heraldry website says the current one was authorized in 1935 and I'm pretty sure I have seen references to this one being worn in WWII. Also, I think soldiers assigned to the Infantry School during WWII wore the Army Ground Forces SSI.

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Yes, I knew that. And technically they are not exactly the same since the DUI has a silver border around the blue shield while the shield of the SSI is solid blue. But for all intents and purposes they are the same. And in my opinion, the Infantry School SSI is one of the nicest looking in the Army. Not too elaborate but very classy.

 

But also notice on the link you posted that below the SSI and DUI it shows the same insignia referred to as a "Device" and says that was originally approved in 1922. I'm not really sure what "Device" means in that context. Maybe it was just used for signs, letterhead, etc. before the actual insignia was worn

 

By the way, this is the DUI that I believe preceded the current one. However, I'm not sure if it was ever officially authorized since the Institute of Heraldry website says the current one was authorized in 1935 and I'm pretty sure I have seen references to this one being worn in WWII. Also, I think soldiers assigned to the Infantry School during WWII wore the Army Ground Forces SSI.

That one is for the WW2 Infantry Training Replacement Centers (IRTC), not The Infantry School at Ft. Benning. There were several IRTCs.

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If any interested parties like, there is a photo they can post in Stanton's Uniforms of WWII that shows a portrait of a Soldier of the Infantry School in either pre war of very early war in Class A with the Follow Me DI on the lower lapels, don't have this book now, so I can't tell you what page it's on, I believe posting this photo would be a great follow up.

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If any interested parties like, there is a photo they can post in Stanton's Uniforms of WWII that shows a portrait of a Soldier of the Infantry School in either pre war of very early war in Class A with the Follow Me DI on the lower lapels, don't have this book now, so I can't tell you what page it's on, I believe posting this photo would be a great follow up.

 

Here is the picture you are talking about. And he's not even Infantry but Quartermaster Corps.

 

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That's the one, thank's, a QM soldier, obviously assigned in some support slot with in this Higher Command orgainzation, a Cook, Supply Clerk, File Clerk, or Typist.

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Here's a picture of LTC George M. Parker, Jr. from a 1936 edition of "The Doughboy" yearbook for the Infantry School officer course, wearing the Infantry School DUI's. This was just one year after the DUI was approved, although, as was often the case, they may have been worn before official approval.

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Ah, came across two more Manhatten Project PTCs being worn, the one guy the Tech 5 would be a immidiate post war guy by virtue of the quadruple discs, with service of course in the recently ended war.

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China-Burma-India Theater. Note the SSI is snap-on which was very common in that theater to allow the patch to be removed before laundering the uniform.

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Major General John A. B. Dillard, Jr., commander of the U.S. Army Engineer Command, Vietnam, when his helicopter was shot down and he was killed on May 12, 1970.

 

In the picture he appears to be wearing the patch type crest of the first style of the U.S. Army Engineer Command, Vietnam (Provisional) which I believe was unofficial. The official SSI was not approved until 2 February 1971 and the Institute of Heraldry does not show any approved DUI.

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Wasn't it the Infantry School DI that came first and the shoulder patch was then based on the metal/enameled DI?

 

Yes it was.

http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Heraldry/ArmyDUISSICOA/ArmyHeraldryUnit.aspx?u=7009

 

I know the DI technically existed before the SSI, but here's a great shot of Brigadier General Omar Bradley wearing the Infantry School DI on his cap.

 

post-1761-0-92906000-1385045991.jpg

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A couple showing the 3rd Infantry Division SSI worn as a crest, although in the second one, the soldier is wearing a different DUI on his cap.

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A couple showing the 3rd Infantry Division SSI worn as a crest, although in the second one, the soldier is wearing a different DUI on his cap.

 

That DI appears to be the 7th Infantry Regt.

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That DI appears to be the 7th Infantry Regt.

Yes indeed, the 7th Infantry's unit crest.

DUI_7IR_3ID.jpg

Odd that he should not wear a pair on his lower lapels, perhaps a case of having only one regimental crest.

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Here's an example from the 83rd Division

 

 

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Always searching for items from 83rd Div (WWII), 3rd Div (Korea), and anything related to the Civil War in Arkansas or Missouri! Will buy or trade!

 

In memory of Pvt Roland L. Gates, Co G, 2nd Bn, 15th Inf, 3rd Division. KIA 15 June 1953 defending Outpost Harry.

 

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Here's a couple of shots of a soldier from the 4th Armored Division in Germany in 1964 wearing the patch type crest on his pile cap. The crest appears to have a tab while his shoulder sleeve insignia does not. I have seen tabs for both "Breakthrough" and "Name Enough" for the 4th. Any thoughts?

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Tabs also exist for the 4th AD that say "Rolling 4th" and "Roosevelt's Butchers" but have never seen either of those on a DI "tab".


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Member, ASMIC.

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His crests don't have some out-dated WWII nickname. Each brigade within the 4th AD during this 1960's time period had it's "own" patch type DI but with the brigade designator across the bottom (Artillery, 1st BDE, 2nd BDE, 3rd BDE, and Support Command, Division Trains, Combat Command A, Combat Command B, etc, etc depending on the time period).

 

For proof, check this out: http://www.usarmygermany.com/Sont.htm?http&&&www.usarmygermany.com/units/4th%20Armd%20Div/USAREUR_4th%20Armd%20Div.htm

 

-Vance


Follow me on Facebook @zemkecollectables

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follow up: If this photo is in fact from 1964, it would be after the "Combat Commands" were reorganized into Brigades. So our five options for his DI are 1st Brigade, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Brigade, Support Command and Artillery.

 

-Vance


Follow me on Facebook @zemkecollectables

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