Jump to content
patches

Post The Patch Type Crest Being Worn.

Recommended Posts

Here's a picture of the 82nd Airborne Division's Command Sergeant Major from the 1982 yearbook wearing the the patch crest on his beret. So this practice for the 82nd is at least 30 years old.

Thank's Sean, odd, one would think that other NCBU DI one would be worn, Maybe it was something only the Divisional CSM wore?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a good one. MG Harry Kinnard, CO of the 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam, wearing a 1st Cav patch crest on his eye patch. Certainly unofficial.

 

Also note the 1st Cav crest on his shoulder strap. Despite what I previously showed about the official 1st Cav DUI being the same as the patch with the addition of two stars on the band, this one does not seem to have the stars and appears to just be a patch type crest.

 

Also note that it is a reverse of the official patch (compare it to the one on the eye patch) with the horse head facing forward when worn on the right shoulder. These were probably manufactured as mirrored pairs to wear this way. The same is true of the picture of Gen. Kinnard in Poat # 24 above.

post-1761-0-31702000-1369142998.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a shot of senior NCO's of the 2nd Armored Division. A couple are wearing the division patch crest on their Ridgeway caps and epaulettes.

 

.

post-1761-0-57935800-1370274874.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know as recently as the 1980's (when I was in the division), Brigade and Division HQ level personnel of the 2nd Armored Division wore the patch type 2AD pin as a DUI.


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif


donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif


donation2017.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is kind of backwards because the DI came first then the patch, but here is my uncle, Sgt William J. Szydlowski, 106th Cavalry Regt in 1941

post-3508-0-41617200-1370327704.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great photo, but unfortunetly as you mentioned yourself, the DI being worn IS the official autherized Distinctive Unit Insignia of the 106th Cavalry, it was the unit's shoulder patch that was based on this unit's DI, not the other way around, thus it can not be classified as a Patch Type Crest.

 

[attachment=649036:imagesCAY0RY34.jpg][attachment=649037:imagesCAVTWI09.jpg]

 

The ideal posting in this topic, will be unit crests based on the design of the shoulder patches that were worn by officers and EM that lacked a unit crest for their sub unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MG Lloyd Fredendall as commanding officer of the 4th Infantry Division wearing the patch crest on his overseas cap c. 1940 -1941.

post-1761-0-52004500-1370531234.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 40th Armored Division on both Cap and Shoulder Loops on the soon to be replaced altogether ODs. A rather self explanatory one due to the included caption. From the March 1958 issue of the National Guardsman. It's interesting that the Sergeant's PTC appears to lack the Grizzly Tab, which we do see being worn below the cloth shoulder patch.

post-34986-0-80960200-1372621412.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20th Air Force being worn by a highly decorated aerial gunner, probably from a B-29. Note the absence of enlisted collar discs.

post-1761-0-67291500-1372702449.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20th Air Force being worn by a highly decorated aerial gunner, probably from a B-29. Note the absence of enlisted collar discs.

A very interesting study, apart from the lack of collar discs, note that he wears the ribbons for his two valor decorations with their numerous oak leaf clusters on the bottom row rather on the top one. A text book photo of the many amolies seen in the immidiate post war period in reguards to ribbon precedent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting study, apart from the lack of collar discs, note that he wears the ribbons for his two valor decorations with their numerous oak leaf clusters on the bottom row rather on the top one. A text book photo of the many amolies seen in the immidiate post war period in reguards to ribbon precedent.

Also note he wears the ribbons of both the European-African-Middle Eastern and Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medals with multiple campaign stars along with the American Campaign Ribbon. There is a hint of a combat patch on his right shoulder - possibly 8th or 15th Air Force from Europe but my guess would be 12th AF or Mediterranean or Desert Air Force and that he served in North Africa and Sicily/Italy before completing his first combat tour, returned home and worked up on a B-29 crew and deployed to the Pacific with the 20th AF later in the war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also note he wears the ribbons of both the European-African-Middle Eastern and Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medals with multiple campaign stars along with the American Campaign Ribbon. There is a hint of a combat patch on his right shoulder - possibly 8th or 15th Air Force from Europe but my guess would be 12th AF or Mediterranean or Desert Air Force and that he served in North Africa and Sicily/Italy before completing his first combat tour, returned home and worked up on a B-29 crew and deployed to the Pacific with the 20th AF later in the war.

Any idea on who he is Sean? He certainly looks Chinese American.

 

Those 20th Air Force PTCs BTW look exceptionally well made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

82nd Airborne Division either from WWII or immediately postwar. It also looks like he's wearing the First Allied Airborne Army SSI on his right sleeve.

post-1761-0-45122300-1372948002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unknown Armored Division crest. As the caption of this photo says it was taken at Fort Benning, Ga. in April 1942, it is most likely the 2nd Armored Division.

 

The guy on the right facing away from the camera is also wearing a crest on his cap, but it doesn't look like a triangle.

post-1761-0-13481400-1373287702.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 7th Inf Div, pre NCBU DI wear of a Patch Type Crest, as seen here on the M1947 OD HBT fatique shirt of MG David Warren Gray CG of the 7th Inf Div circa 1964.

post-34986-0-29489200-1373333630.jpg

post-34986-0-42925900-1373333752.jpg

Photos credited to Gil Sanow, first posted by him in 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 33rd Infantry Division as seen on Pvt Edward Colwell, the infamous upside down wearing CIB GI from CHASEUSA11B's recent post, posted here with his kind permission. Colwell is from the 123rd Infantry, the reason Colwell wears this type of Crest is that the WWII era 123rd Infantry had no DI, it only got one for the first time in March 1952, when the 123rd Inf was on active duty with the 44th Infantry Division lIlinois National Guard.

post-34986-0-32280100-1376032850.jpg

 

The DI of the 123rd Inf adopted in 1952. Discontinued in 1954 when the 123rd unf was inactivated

post-34986-0-17302800-1376032938.jpg

 

And the one adopted in I think 1968, these were originally the DIs of the 106th Tank Battalion, the 106th was redesignated as the new 123rd Inf then, not sure if the 123rd Inf is still around in the IIlinois NG.

post-34986-0-30434000-1376033207.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4th Armored Division late 50's/early 60's. Notice he doesn't have the ribbon for the World War II Victory Medal.

post-1761-0-06057800-1377741306.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 123rd was not a Natl Gd activated for WWII. It was a newly-created unit to fill a space in the 33rd ID line-up before it deployed for war. Its personnel were overwhelmingly non-NG -- draftees with OR and RA cadres.

 

After the war, the NG in all states was reorganized with many and sundry changes. Some old units disappeared and new ones established. In teh 1946-1948 period, each state sent to the Pentagon a "State Plan" laying out the units they wanted and thought they could justify as essential to the natl defense. (Some of these, in retrospect, were ridiculously pumped up "wish lists", with no factoring in of realistic facilities, personnel, training areas, maintenance capabilities, etc.Just ploys for pork-barrel spending and slots for pols' pals.) .Illinois (like NY, Cal, and TX) wanted TWO Divs and basically squeezed the War Dept with political pressure. (Truman wanted his Universal Mil Tng plan which would put hordes of half-trained reservists on the street, ripe for NG recruitment and 1948 was an election year.) For a time, Illinois wanted/expected an Armored Div --- but that job was taken, by the 21st Armd Div (ORC), headquartered in Detroit with some elements in northern Ill. This "insult" just redoubled the political intrigue for a second ILNG Div, and the 44th was it. (NOTE: Unlike lower echelon units like Regts, Div HQs can be allotted and withdrawn from one state and given to another (Air NG units work the same way). The 44th pre-war was NY/NJ, but post-war NY got the 42nd and NJ did get an Armd Div.)

 

The 44th was in the southern half of the state and the 33rd in the north. When the Korean War came along, the 33rd was so bad that it could not be Federalized, so the rose was pinned on the somewhat-better 44th. In order to make the 44th fit, it got many individually-selected personnel from throughout the 33rd and other ILNG units. It went to Ft Lewis...but was judged as unfit and/or unready, as a unit, to serve overseas. As a result it was marked for demise, and that happened when it went off Federal duty in 1954. Out of the ashes, the best remnants (individuals and units) were merged into the 33rd (which was already being closely watched by Washington -- not to kill it off but to prop it up and pretend everything was fine Illinois). This is why the DUI changed,,,,though the post-1954 123rd was really a new and different outfit, with some pieces of the pre-1954 123rd rolled into it, it needed a cosmetic makeover. The latter 123rd largely descended from Cav/Armor units

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4th Armored Division late 50's/early 60's. Notice he doesn't have the ribbon for the World War II Victory Medal.

What unit would you say this fella was in? He has Crossed Rifles without Blue Backing plus no Blue Rope, with the PTC. A Soldier still holding his Infantry MOS, if in fact photo from the late 50s early 60s, before ROAD, then perhaps he's in one of HHCs of the Combat Commands?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A WWII Ike with the 2nd Armd Div PTCs.

post-34986-0-17196600-1378442754.jpg

* photo originally posted by Stinger Gunner USMC

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 9th Air Force seen on the Garrison Cap of this uniform of this AAC Officer, though none are worn on the shoulder loops of the coat.

post-34986-0-82451100-1378442982.jpg

* photo originally posted by charles68

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now this one is the oddest of WWII PTC I,ve seen the AC's Engineer Triangle, here it's seen on the lower lapels of this Ike, no reason why I can think of these being made really as it wasn't a unit, Patch Type Crest are metal/enameled copys of Shoulder patches.

post-34986-0-51476900-1378443288.jpg

* photo was originally posted by another member, I forgot who :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.