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Found these at some local antique shops. They are from the USS Norfolk, USS R. K. Huntington, and VAW-12 Skipper's plaque with his clipped wings.

 

The VAW-12 plaque and the USS Norfolk plaque dates from 1963. The Huntington plaque is not dated. Both the Norfolk and Huntington plaques are painted aluminum.

 

The Skipper earned his wings in 1944, and flew F4 Corsairs well into the Korean War before going to the VAW community.

 

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Chris,

 

 

People do care about plaques, but they are fewer in number than those who collect other things. Myself, I like plaques, but they do pose a storage problem. I think they display nicely though, and really help to add a connection to the ship/unit which is missing just displaying a uniform on it's own.

 

Very nice exampes, I like them.

 

RC


"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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Thanks RC,

Being located in Norfolk, I find these plaques fairly often during my travels. I was trying to guage collector interest on these plaques and see if the others enjoyed these old plaques. The brass and molded aluminum painted plaques are nicely made. I have seen a few on Ebay, but those dont seem to sell often.

 

Chris


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Aloha Chris,

 

I have piles of plaques (yes, piles of them) in my warehouse that I've collected over the past 40 years. I used to display some of them but having the dedicated wall space became an issue as it was crowded out by my need for more bookcases for the library. Storage is definitely an issue with collecting plaques as they come in many sizes and materials so they're bulky, heavy and have finishes to protect. The prices are crazy, ranging from a few bucks to hundreds for each one.

 

You've picked up some nice ones, I especially like the NORFOLK and HUNTINGTON plaques as my collection is focused upon the surface navy.

 

There ya go......

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I like the clipped wing plaque!...i dont collect these but see them at the local army navy store, they usually have 4-10 of them for sale .....mike


Always looking for and buying 50's era 11th Airborne/ 187th ARCT/ 82nd Airborne tac mark painted jump helmets!



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I love the clipped wings!

 

I've had more than my fair share of plaques over the years, including the really nice mother of pearl ones from South Korea (I think they're, on whole, the nicest...) They are neat, but even when I cleared out AF General Bradley's estate (he was a four-star general, retired, and had boxes and boxes of them...) I still couldn't sell them well. I think a lot of people just run out of display space and they're often very hard to store.

 

As it is, from my time in the Navy, I received a plaque from every command I was attached to (several, in some cases). They fill the walls of my office at work. But when I no longer have an office...I'm still going to hate to store them as they're heavy and relatively useless. :D


Only a weak society needs government protection or intervention before it pursues its resolve to preserve the truth. Truth needs neither handcuffs nor a badge for its vindication. -Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Peace is not the absence of war, but the defense of hard-won freedom. -Anton LaGuardia


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Yes I agree, these plaques do present a large storage problem, but I really do not actively collect these plaques.

 

My problem is that whenever I happen to run across one, I have to buy it!! Hopefully I wont run across too many!!

 

I do have another plaque from CDR. Motley when he was assigned to the Saratoga. This one is hand-made and was probably given to him by his Department Sailors.

 

The clipped wings were also CDR. Motley's.

 

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Here is a Plaque presented by Admiral Rickover to up and coming nuclear submarine COs.

 

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Those are sweet. Love the CTF-115 and ADM Rickover.

 

commfvm c 0 SFIUER DEC 20, 1972 Captain Robert E. CRISPIN is a native of Elmira, New York. Ile was graduated fwlllgge United States Naval Academy with the Class of 48A and commissioned an Enslllll 00 5 Jugs. Ugg Upon graduation from the Naval Academy he was assigned to the Attack Cars0 IP ed cnnlm mica-ssl and later to the Oiler. uss MANATEE KAO-58l. Captain CRISPIN then enter the submarine service and Served on board the submarines USS CORSAIRKSS-4351. USS HARDHEAD QSS-3653, and USS REDFIN CSS-2721. After attending an eight month course of instruction at the National Reactor Testlnl Smrifm' ldaho F ll ' a s. Idaho, Captain CRISPIN was ordered to shore duty as an instructor in the Nlldell' Power Division of the Submarine School at New London, Conn. , Ile was next assigned to the nuclear powered submarine USS SEAWOLF lSSN'5'75l and partie cipated in the record 60 day submerged cruise conducted by SEAWOLF in 1958. He was then assigned to USS NAUTILUS ISSN-5713 followed by reassignment to USS SEAWOLF. Cilllmm CRISPIN was awarded a CINCLANTFLT Commendation for the period of 1961 - 1962 while servins in seawour. Upon completion of his tour nr duty on board uss sr:AwoLr-'. captain CRlSP'N."'S ordered to USS SCAMP tSSN-5885 as Commanding Officer and served in that capacity until 13 December 1963 during which time he was awarded the Legion of Merit. UDDI! detachment fr0m SCAMP he attended various , n courses of instruction, and assumed command of the Polaris Missile Submarine USS NATHANAEL GREENE. Upon his completion of his tour of dut , y on board NATHANAEL GREENE in Selltember 1957- Captain CRISPIN was assigned to staff of Commander Submarine Force Pacific Fleet 35 PW snective Commanding Officer Instruct or and Tactical Development Officer. ln August 1969 he was as i 9 S Ened as Commander in Chlef Atlantic Representative to Direcwf Strategic Planning at Offutt Air Force Base N b . e raska with additional duty aa Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic Representative t . 0 the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff and Commander in Chief Atlantic Liaison to Commander in- Chief Strategic Air Command. Captain CRISPIN resides with hi s wife Carol and two

 

 

 

Robert Crispin, Sr., CDR-USN (dec. CAPT-USN)

Born in Elvira, NY, he achieved Eagle Scout and went on to be an assistant scout master for Troop No. 362. He attended the Naval Academy, and served in the Navy during World War II, Korea and Vietnam Wars. He was an Engineer Officer aboard the USS Nautilus. He commanded USS Seawolf (SSN 575), USS Scamp (SSN 588) and USS Nathaniel Greene (SSBN 636). He was the key speaker at the decommissioning ceremony for Nathaniel Greene. He also was CO of USS Raleigh (?).

He and his wife Carol J. Crispin were parents of Robert E. Crispin and Robyn Crispin Butler, and had 5 grandchildren.

Captain Crispin passed away Wednesday, Nov 13, 2001 in Virginia Beach, VA. He is buried at Colonial Grove Cemetery in the same city.

(Biographical information was extracted from his obituary)

 

 

 

Robert Crispin, Sr., CDR-USN (dec. CAPT-USN)

Born in Elvira, NY, he achieved Eagle Scout and went on to be an assistant scout master for Troop No. 362. He attended the Naval Academy, and served in the Navy during World War II, Korea and Vietnam Wars. He was an Engineer Officer aboard the USS Nautilus. He commanded USS Seawolf (SSN 575), USS Scamp (SSN 588) and USS Nathaniel Greene (SSBN 636). He was the key speaker at the decommissioning ceremony for Nathaniel Greene. He also was CO of USS Raleigh (?).

He and his wife Carol J. Crispin were parents of Robert E. Crispin and Robyn Crispin Butler, a


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ASMIC #1098

 





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Thanks FF!

 

That is some great info on Captain Crispin.

 

The Rickover awarded plaque is one of my favorites.

 

Chris


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Thanks FF!

 

That is some great info on Captain Crispin.

 

The Rickover awarded plaque is one of my favorites.

 

Chris

 

Chris you're welcome.


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ASMIC #1098

 





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These are great. I love all the sub plaques. I got one when I left the Wyoming.


Submarines once, submarines twice...


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Looking for:


SUBMARINE STUFF!

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Aloha Chris,

 

I have piles of plaques (yes, piles of them) in my warehouse that I've collected over the past 40 years. I used to display some of them but having the dedicated wall space became an issue as it was crowded out by my need for more bookcases for the library. Storage is definitely an issue with collecting plaques as they come in many sizes and materials so they're bulky, heavy and have finishes to protect. The prices are crazy, ranging from a few bucks to hundreds for each one.

 

You've picked up some nice ones, I especially like the NORFOLK and HUNTINGTON plaques as my collection is focused upon the surface navy.

 

There ya go......

 

This is what I had on hand here, much more in my warehouse loft

 

All types here, Bakelite (WWII) Amber Resin (Korea) Ceramic (Vietnam) Tiles (post Vietnam), Aluminum (Cold War), Steel/Brass (Cold War), Decal (1950's 1960's), Bronze (all eras), Dark Resin (1980's on) Metal etched (late Cold War to present), etc.

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Great plaques!!

 

Here are two aviation plaques I found recently.

 

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USS BUSHNELL (AS-15) Fulton class Submarine Tender to SUBRON 12, in service 1943 to 1970 "The Burning Bush"

In 1965, she suffered a serious fire in some electrical generation equipment — and earned the nickname "the burning Bush". There was only one minor injury in that incident, and it didn't affect operations for long. She returned to Key West in 1967 to continue her service to the submarine fleet. In 1968, she celebrated her 25th year of service. She continued to supply services to SubRon 12 as well as support services to other ships in the Caribbean and Gulf Coast regions. She made regular visits to New Orleans, Mobile, Fort Lauderdale and Kingston, Jamaica.
In 1969, Bushnell was the Navy response ship for Hurricane Camille. She and her crew rebuilt Pilottown, Louisiana, so that river traffic could again move on the Mississippi. Unfortunately, however, her nickname came to haunt her when in early 1970 a high pressure airline ruptured in the bilge, atomizing the oil and other liquids resulting in an explosion and fire that damaged the ship beyond repair. Her own crew did all of her own decommissioning work (not in a shipyard) in early 1970.
She was replaced in Key West by her sister ship Howard W. Gilmore and sunk as a target.
USS BUSHNELL Plaque from the Gunnery Officer who was aboard during the "Burning Bush" incident

 

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