Jump to content

Show some imagination.....please!


Recommended Posts

@ Lee. I consider your group to be "professionals", if you will. Re-enactors of the highest order who do it "by the book" with absolute attention to detail. I'm more concerned about the "casuals" who just dress up as paratroopers with no real semblance of order. To them it's just a "cool pose"...know what I mean? I think it boils down to the availability of (relatively) cheap Jump-suits in all sizes and fits. Today I saw kids of no more than 10-12 years of age wandering around in full gear and, at the other end of the scale, gentlemen of "mature" age and "generous" physique. I'm sure you know what I'm referring to? It's become a cliche!

 

Ian :thumbsup:

 

Yes Ian, I do tend to agree with you in regards the younger (Baby) Paratroopers. There is a certain age I hate seeing even in Military Gear, but it can not be stopped of course and this is one event (We dont do this one for that reason) that will encourage rightly or wrongly this standard. We tend to ster well clear of these events, not because we think we are anything special, but because we would rather be involved in the type of events that set their standards a little higher and we try to reach those statndards.

 

We have younger members, with very little money but we help out with the loan of kit for the greater good of the overall group impression.

 

It is a fact of life in the hobby that some groups thrown together set their standards very low with their reserch going no further than watching BOB and these will be seen in the display field alongside other well organised and turned out groups. But there are events out there that you will see only accurate impressions, even of the most represented of all, the 101st Airborne Division. Kelmarsh in July is one such multi period event where it is not often you will see an American Airborne Impression taking place, but will see many line and Armoured units and good living history outfits doing something a little different.

 

We do of course appreciate your kind words Ian, but we are just one of quite a few groups here in the uk who take it a little more seriously than perhaps those you saw at this event!

 

I am almost finished our last event photo report, but as it will be 101st based and reading some of the comments here I think perhaps we should not bother to post up on here for now, the same old stuff I appreciate can get a little boring I know.

 

Kindest regards to you Ian and look forward to introducing you to the boys and grils of the group in Normandy in a few weeks time.

 

Kindest Regards

 

Lee

Link to post
Share on other sites
willysmb44

I will often ask people when they started a certian impression if I feel they hopped on the bandwagon. If they either admit outright to getting into the hobby after seeing a popular movie or TV series, I have the same reaction if they:

  • Got into Rangers, 29th ID or 101st after the summer of 1998 (When Saving Private Ryan was well known)
  • Got into 506 PIR after 2001 (when BoB came out)
  • Got into USMC right after "The Pacific" was shown (although I see very few of these)

I just look them over and slowly say, "Uh-huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh," then walk off. A couple of times, they've followed me asking what I meant by that. I've been honest, saying that they can't possibly convince me that they aren't re-enacting a TV show/movie. I have yet to have any give a good argument as to why they aren't doing just that.

Now, there are a few folks who have been doing AB (and yes, even 506th PIR) long before the book was well known and the series was even dreamed of. In those cases, I see no reason to give them any guff. That said, I got into this hobby in 1989, and until the mid-90s, I hardly saw anyone doing airborne anywhere. Even at the large events there were a few units, but I saw far more people doing 1st ID (and you could, I guess, argued many of them were doing so due to the movie, "The Big Red One") than any US Airborne impressions. Most AB folks I ever saw prior to 1998 were doing 82nd AB so they could do as many different scenarios as possible.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Member_2114

Im proud to say that I'm part of a group that recognises the Citizen soldier regardless of what unit it is. We've portrayed numerous units-1st,2nd,3rd,4th, 28th, 79th 83rd, 517th Airborne, to name but a few. Our brief is to pay homage to all.

 

I also get annoyed when I see those that wish to promenade at events focusing solely on a a cliched version of how they feel an American paratrooper should look. And generally wearing all the gear with no idea.

 

Less is more...

Link to post
Share on other sites
willysmb44

My group is a display group and we all focus on different aspects of the US soldier in WW2. You name it, we do it. If you take a good look at this group photo from a few years ago you'll see all kinds of impressions (and some farby stuff, in that we have a couple of 'vehicle people' types who don't go out 100% but have great vehicles so we allow it because they're not all that big on the public interaction anyway). There are a couple of people with psotwar impressions in a couple of these photos as well, as they're emmbers doing other stuff at the same events sometimes...

Only three paratroopers here:

groupshotOly07.jpg

And one here:

FOWJ_4-081.jpg

I also get annoyed when I see those that wish to promenade at events focusing solely on a a cliched version of how they feel an American paratrooper should look. And generally wearing all the gear with no idea.

Less is more...

Good point. I think like this about vehicles all the time as well. How many Jeeps do you see with 'nose art', markings that look like they were done with a laser in a factory, and every freaking thing you can bolt to a Jeep? In WW2 photos, you see most jeeps lack shovels, jerry cans. many don't even have headlights, and most are lacking markings. But you'll hardly ever see vehicles at events that look like that...
Link to post
Share on other sites
2ndInf.Div.
I will often ask people when they started a certian impression if I feel they hopped on the bandwagon. If they either admit outright to getting into the hobby after seeing a popular movie or TV series, I have the same reaction if they:
  • Got into Rangers, 29th ID or 101st after the summer of 1998 (When Saving Private Ryan was well known)
  • Got into 506 PIR after 2001 (when BoB came out)
  • Got into USMC right after "The Pacific" was shown (although I see very few of these)

I just look them over and slowly say, "Uh-huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh," then walk off. A couple of times, they've followed me asking what I meant by that. I've been honest, saying that they can't possibly convince me that they aren't re-enacting a TV show/movie. I have yet to have any give a good argument as to why they aren't doing just that.

Now, there are a few folks who have been doing AB (and yes, even 506th PIR) long before the book was well known and the series was even dreamed of. In those cases, I see no reason to give them any guff. That said, I got into this hobby in 1989, and until the mid-90s, I hardly saw anyone doing airborne anywhere. Even at the large events there were a few units, but I saw far more people doing 1st ID (and you could, I guess, argued many of them were doing so due to the movie, "The Big Red One") than any US Airborne impressions. Most AB folks I ever saw prior to 1998 were doing 82nd AB so they could do as many different scenarios as possible.

 

It would be great if The Pacific actually was an inspiration to get people to do PTO. Personally I'd love to do it, but I would do Army since I refuse to wear a Marine uniform.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The one thing I get a kick out of is all the "A" tents used in civil war. When we did 23rd NY we NEVER slept in an "A" or wall ONLY dog tents AND sometimes 3 of us per tent! Those larger tents are very heavy to carry on your back. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
m1ashooter

Looks like a lot of fun. Can a person own a working cannon in the UK or does that have to be non working also? It is interesting in seeing Union troops in the UK. At least the VN camp had the Battle Flag of the CSA on display!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jack's Son

How about a panel of USMF members judging all the displays, and show goers!! :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like a lot of fun. Can a person own a working cannon in the UK or does that have to be non working also? It is interesting in seeing Union troops in the UK. At least the VN camp had the Battle Flag of the CSA on display!

 

 

There were Johnny Rebs too! As for the field pieces...they fire blank charges.

 

post-8022-1336374556.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes Ian, I do tend to agree with you in regards the younger (Baby) Paratroopers. There is a certain age I hate seeing even in Military Gear, but it can not be stopped of course and this is one event (We dont do this one for that reason) that will encourage rightly or wrongly this standard. We tend to ster well clear of these events, not because we think we are anything special, but because we would rather be involved in the type of events that set their standards a little higher and we try to reach those statndards.

 

We have younger members, with very little money but we help out with the loan of kit for the greater good of the overall group impression.

 

It is a fact of life in the hobby that some groups thrown together set their standards very low with their reserch going no further than watching BOB and these will be seen in the display field alongside other well organised and turned out groups. But there are events out there that you will see only accurate impressions, even of the most represented of all, the 101st Airborne Division. Kelmarsh in July is one such multi period event where it is not often you will see an American Airborne Impression taking place, but will see many line and Armoured units and good living history outfits doing something a little different.

 

We do of course appreciate your kind words Ian, but we are just one of quite a few groups here in the uk who take it a little more seriously than perhaps those you saw at this event!

 

I am almost finished our last event photo report, but as it will be 101st based and reading some of the comments here I think perhaps we should not bother to post up on here for now, the same old stuff I appreciate can get a little boring I know.

 

Kindest regards to you Ian and look forward to introducing you to the boys and grils of the group in Normandy in a few weeks time.

 

Kindest Regards

 

Lee

 

 

Hi Lee. Please go ahead and post a selection of your latest pics when they're available. There are bona-fide re-enactors and wannabe re-enactors. Your organization is most definitely in the former category, as the photos you post always attest!

 

Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Lee. Please go ahead and post a selection of your latest pics when they're available. There are bona-fide re-enactors and wannabe re-enactors. Your organization is most definitely in the former category, as the photos you post always attest!

 

Ian

 

Roger Out Ian, will do buddy

 

Regards

 

Lee

Link to post
Share on other sites
Johan Willaert
Yours truly..having fun in a Jeep!

 

post-8022-1336344351.jpg

 

You should come to Bruges, Ian... I'd take you for a spin in mine... ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Johan. How about a trip around the Christmas Market?! :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rookie airborne re-enactors being taught close-order drill.

 

post-8022-1336405204.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The British Home Guard re-enactors. Glamorgan was the largest county in South Wales during WW2.

 

post-8022-1336405406.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is Britain...we have many Medieval re-enactors too. The castle formed a perfect backdrop for them.

 

 

post-8022-1336405681.jpgpost-8022-1336405667.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

....and the Wild West too!

 

post-8022-1336405881.jpgpost-8022-1336405895.jpg[a

tachment=520819:2012_0506FW0073.JPG]

post-8022-1336405912.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
cutiger83

These pictures look great! We NEVER have a show this nice around here!

 

....Kat

Link to post
Share on other sites
bargunner

I agree with everything that's been said. But what I find even funnier is all the videos on YouTube with 9 year olds

and their 101st AB "impressions", home made guns and gear from Hong Kong............neve fails to entertain.

Link to post
Share on other sites
uplandmod

I have to agree with you sabrejet,

 

First the positive, it's great to see a dozens of people dressed up in the same impression, We have two huge airborne groups here in California and they do an excellent job putting their impressions together and a definite thumbs up all around.

 

I have a near complete Airborne impression (just missing the helmet and boots, nothing too difficult and if I wanted to I could go over to ATF and buy them right now) I considered going airborne but you know, that uniform just didn't feel right on me, I just couldn't get into it. I collect and reenact dogface all the way, it's the story I want to tell to the public during events and what I want to learn about when I'm out in the field we have one of the more larger infantry groups here around 17+ people show up to our larger events.

 

I loved reenacting Navy as well,The Sand Pebbles was a fantastic film and for awhile right before the demise of the Great Western I was doing a WWI/China Bluejacket with the leggings, '03 Springfield, Kelley Helmet et al. People loved it because it was so different and unique and I won a trophy at the GW for it. Not only that it is to this day the most comfortable uniform I have ever worn, unfortunately I don't fit into anymore. It would have been great to do an entire group impression of Bluejackets.

 

My huge problem is the attitude and chips on their shoulders that many paratrooper re enactors have about their impression and group. If your throwing attitude and platitudes towards me, they are seriously a poser as jumping out of a real airplane is quite different than taking pictures in front of one. If you going to do that impression, go all the way, if not be considerate of others who don't do the airborne impression.

 

Leonardo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing your views and experiences gentlemen....and lady! ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Captainofthe7th

I've said this recently but I have gotten less interested in the reenacting scene recently, one of the reasons being that around here the Airborne dominates....every tactical event about half of the allied soldiers are airborne and of course they do all sorts of fun stuff. They do all the recon, all the rushing into trenches, and all the winning it seems. The airborne did NOT win the war alone!!! To boot, half of their impressions are ridiculous as they run around in the summer time with M42s (why not just wear wools?) literally armed to the teeth with all sorts of gear and weapons, like they based their impression off of that one picture of E Co. on June 7. I think a couple of you already mentioned this, but I end up doing a lot of early war events, MTO and So. France and guess what....the 101st always shows up. Wait a year guys, it's only 1943!

 

I completely agree with you...SHOW SOME IMAGINATION!! People think other stuff is cool too. I am very proud to do Korean War Army infantry and WWII U.S. Navy radioman. I get a lot of attention and compliments for representing the 'normal' serviceman. At displays, many vets can relate to the average impression. Something simple. They say "wow, you look just like I did back in 1944!" But when you're carrying a bazooka, thompson, 1911, and three knives, it's more like Call of Duty than real life.

 

No disrespect to the Airborne, and I have seen Airborne reenactors with great impressions, but in my opinion and in general they find a way to be the center of attention at events. I'll echo what Leonardo just said about the Airborne reenactors having chips on their shoulders. Though I do want to reiterate that I have met some really outstanding A/B reenactors who SHOULD be proud of their impressions and how they conduct themselves....but guess what...they all happen to be 82nd!

 

Rob

Link to post
Share on other sites

One o worst......least ways in the realm of reenacting. Look at it this way, Speilberg could have done a film on the Property Book Office heroes at Ton Sa Nhut, and the wannabes would be dressing as REMFs at reenactments. But, he used material from a self aggrandizing historian who would cut-and-past sections from a previous book and add it to a newer release. Not to mention other less than scholarly actions. Hey, I met Mr. A. ten years back, and when he found that I knew some 506 and 501 men in Florida, he became a pest. Ehh now we have REMFs dressed as 101. Hey, even Walter Mitty has to have play time.

Or it could have been the 82nd, and we would be complaining about a preponderance of "Almost Airborne" children. Hmmmmm, well, at least the 82nd IS still an airborne!....no bullwinkle badges there! The largest part of this blowout of airborne jocks is the efforts of At The Front, who, after obtaining several tractor trailer loads of movie uniforms and props, made it possible for you to buy all you needed for a 101 impression...a soldier in a box! Even Mr. Curtis pokes fun at the totality of 506ers out there. Look what is happening now after "the Pacific"...lots of 6 ft gaijins running around as IJA/IJNs.

We have a lot of SS too, and with comes the fair number of "true-believers." I am sure all periods have those that detract from the event. Oh well, after doing the 6th SS for years, my son wants to do regular Wehrmacht infantry as "everybody does SS." And here I picked a unit that was free of atrocities!

We are playing dress up, and someone will wrinkle someone else s sensibilities at some time or another. If reenacting was limited to those who have been soldiers, I would be fine with that, but what would the Air Force and Navy guys do? Cross train? The hobby attracts all kinds, like the nation, and we play together fairly well. It is funny though, seeing Roman Legionaries in the States, or Roundheads, Greek Hoplites or all sundry impressions that you find at the SCA...gotta have things for reenactors to make fun of instead of each other! Over in Europe, you can go in your backyard and find history...not as much here.:) I especially like the snootiness of the line "There are bona-fide re-enactors and wannabe re-enactors. ...we are all reenactors! That is as silly as claiming that you do Living History....Just because you spent more on a uniform than the other guy, does not make you more of a soldier...do you have a DD214? it is all in the past, and all you, we, do is dress up Now, if we can figure out what to do with all those dismounted Civil war cavalry (why buy a horse?), Kreigsmarine sub crews (...submarine? hmmm, there is one in Chicago..), aircraft pilots and crews (...OK, there are the occasional airshows) and all the others that rankle the purist amongst us. Or leave 'em be, for if not for wannabes, there would not be so many of the rest of us. And the kids? They grow up to be better reenactors, as long as they learn proper safety and decorum. To keep a hobby strong, we need new recruits.

So, we can make fun of each other, or just them, but just remember that they make fun of us as well :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.