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Anyone know what this O2 tank is for?


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Does anyone know what the practical use of this oxygen tank assembly might have been?

 

Its labeled with NSN# 1660- 01-012-8108 and dated 12-77, tanks are rated for 2100 psi.

 

When I look it up the description is OXYGEN SYSTEM, FREE FALL, and it appears under the Aircraft Components and Accessories / Aircraft Air Conditioning, Heating, and Pressurizing Equipment section.

 

Other oxygen tanks Ive seen used by parachutists are single tank items, so I was wondering if it might have been for emergency use in an aircraft of some kind.

 

Any info is appreciated!

 

Thanks,

Rick

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Looks like an earlier HALO oxygen setup from the 70s, def not the current style. The current one does use a twin bottle setup similar to that but different tanks and the regulator is different. This looks like it used a bailout bottle style rubber hose and fitting to deliver the oxygen and its clearly cut off.

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  • 10 months later...

That assembly is part of the O2 system for the MC-3 HALO Freefall rig which used the 24' flat circular, steering modified canopy for high altitude work. circa 70s

The hose that's been cut would have connected to the CRU-60 for the MS22001 (or other)

Info can be found in TM 10-1670-264-13&P

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Id imagine if Army used with a MS mask in the 70s, it probably had a MC-3A connector installed on the mask vs a 3 pin bayonet connector for a CRU. Never saw a Army Aviation MS mask with anything other than the MC-3A but also never saw a MS that was actually used for HALO in a actual photo, just recent displays. Basically does the same job for a bailout or aircraft supply connection but stays with the mask and makes it a bit heavier. Figured I was tracking right on it was a HALO setup. FPI Ohio is still in business making Aviators Breathing Oxygen regulators, connectors and such.

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The MC-3A would be difficult to "anchor" to the parachute harness, where as the CRU-60 had a hard bayonet mount to

facilitate stability at terminal velocity. Maybe the most deciding factor between the two. Below is a couple of pics from the TM.

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I sold this item to another forum member not long after posting this question, he sent me a link to some pics of the bottle set in use.

 

First pic is labeled;

 

Special Force, April 1982. Fort Bragg, NC. The five Special Force units: Combat Parachutist, High Flight Parachutist, Mountain Training, Frogmen, and Forest Jumper.

 

You can see the bottle under the reserve.

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Well thats what I needed to see all this time. The pub has great info clearly, they have the newer silicone hoses that are longer and clearly the 3 pin bayonet hose fitting. The Army Aviation MS masks had the shorter cloth like O2 hose and the MC-3As. Those shorter hoses are awful.

 

I def agree about the CRU being more secure, those dumb nylon straps with the snaps are flimsy on the MC-3A. Saw a F-51D Mustang TO a while back that showed the proper way to attach that strap to the chest strap of the chute harness. Never knew there was a actual way to deal with that strap.

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