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Bob Hudson

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Everything posted by Bob Hudson

  1. Those subminiature cameras were introduced in 1938 and actually used as spy cameras. I have an empty camera case for one, but no film or camera
  2. That's pretty much it: I don't believe anything can prevent it in the long run. In boating zinc is used as a sacrificial metal to help prevent corrosion of other metals such as prop shafts, through-hull fittings, etc. If I had one of these knives I would store it out of the scabbard just to keep the zinc from having any sort of connection with the brass or tanned leather in the scabbard.
  3. That makes sense because the copper sheathing also protects against marine flora and fauna growing on the hull.
  4. Here's a sampling of completed sales for the last several year. $2,500 seems to be the average low end price, but nicer ones can go for over $3,000. Notice that one went for $3,350 this year and in 2016 one sold for over $3,700!
  5. Finally got time to really go through the four photo albums: my rough count is about 1,200 military photos, post cards and bits of original trench maps - all World War 1 - and maybe hundreds of "tourist" postcards from the turn of the 20th century. Scroll down for a YouTube video. The photos are original photos including Real Photo Post Cards. Most of the post cards are tinted and pre-WWI, except for some post-WWII travel postcards in one of the four albums. The are two large albums and two smaller ones. The veteran who started this collection stam
  6. The family sorted and cataloged aeveral cans of buttons and belt hardware
  7. A local WWI collector (who actually knew what all this stuff was) bought that.
  8. Yes, it personalizes it. I have four photo/postcard albums from him I've only skimmed through. That one photo was loose and felt out onto the floor. I can imagine he would have gotten a kick out of knowing that things he brought home from that war would have people all over the world oohing and awing over a century later. He really did create a time chest that provides a glimpse into what was of interest to a doughboy. Speaking of time and its passage, I got this all from his daughter who is about my age, 70. She and I are what they call "baby boomers" but
  9. Thanks. I noticed a few of the smaller ones are bent in the same manner, as shown in this photo.
  10. His daughter said he got them on the battlefield, but one never knows. She was the one who sorted buttons and other items in the cans and had wrapped the other items in shipping paper. She numbered each: I think that must have been for an inventory list, but I haven't seen it.
  11. I had the pleasure of showing this to a very knowledgeable WWI collector who came by today. He started looking the cans of buttons and found these in one can:
  12. These mystery bits were in a can marked "Metal Things?" The are several cans of buttons:
  13. It looks like a wire pair wrapped in what looks like paper: Maybe comm wire - his unit "matained lines of communications to the front."
  14. That's on my mystery list (along with the glove and most of the decorations).
  15. Almost forgot about the two rusted bayonets and the one lone scabbard: the one of the left is a WWI ersatz Bayonet with scabbard and the other is a WWI S98/05 bayonet marked for Mundlos & Co. and Hartkopf Solingen.
  16. The exterior of the grenade chest is pretty much all overpainted with his name and unit info.
  17. It's one of the more interesting unboxings I've done: most of the Imperial German Prussian stuff is new to me so I'm spending a lot of time on research, which mostly means trying to get translations of the old German writing on the medals, badges, etc. Some of those words as written bring up zero responses on Google.
  18. Thanks. I found a website in French that has a lot of images of these. Here's an excerpt from one including a launcher:
  19. Here's a photo of him with a tank: he circled himself and wrote his initials.
  20. Some more from the bringback - US and German and a small French Adrian helmet inkwell:
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