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Officer's Clubs?

Started by pmanton , Mar 28 2017 06:40 AM

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#1 pmanton

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 06:40 AM

Some years back I was near Ft. Lewis in Washington State and decided to go to the "O Club" for lunch. ( I'm retired) I found out that Officer's Club was now a Community Center.

 

Have the Services done away with the Officer's Clubs or was this just an Army thing?

 

Thanks

 

Paul

Salome, AZ



#2 Dave

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 06:55 AM

They've gotten rid of officer's clubs pretty much throughout the military. Partially from a forced cultural change (the days of drinking and picking up on random women in the bar...a la Top Gun...are frowned upon) plus a general lack of interest in officers from younger generations. 



#3 easterneagle87

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 07:50 AM

Was at my daughters in FL and decided to drive up to Mother Rucker for a trip down memory lane. Didn't recognize a thing and the O Club became, I think, a "servicemans club". So all ranks could mingle and drink. Yep those days are gone.  



#4 pmanton

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 04:57 PM

Thanks for the update. 



#5 hardstripe

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:49 AM

I served as an enlisted club manager in Germany in the mid 1980s. I managed the Officer's Club at Ferris Barracks in Erlangen Germany. During my tenure as club manager the Army decided that O' Clubs would become Officer's and Senior NCO Clubs.
In 1985 the Army decided to eliminate Enlisted Club Manager positions and hire civilians to run the clubs. During the mid-1980s the Armed services started to downplay the role of alcohol in military traditions and service and offered programs to help soldiers kick the habit.
Over the next few years the rising costs of using civilians instead of military managers led to many clubs closing for want of revenue. Also during the 1980s Appropriated fund support of all extra-curricular activity disappeared and any off duty activity had to become self-sufficient or go away. This included clubs, arts and crafts centers, youth activities, etc.
As the Army moved into the 1990s and into the 21st century there was less and less emphasis on these activities and many disappeared. Added to that the fact that fewer soldiers (also in the civilian sector) were consuming alcohol changed the emphasis of remaining clubs from beer halls to community centers offering more and more services for families.
Add to that the banning of in-theater use of alcohol for service members during our recent wars further led to the demise of the Club.
When I was stationed at Camp Casey, Korea in the mid 1990s the Eight Army commander directed that the drinking age be changed to 21 due to so many incidents involving younger soldiers.
It was a sign of the times.

Edited by hardstripe, 29 March 2017 - 04:52 AM.


#6 pmanton

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 07:15 AM

I retired in 75. O Club membership was mandatory. You were expected to drink, but woe on you if you couldn't hold your booze. There was Right Arm night where you brought your top NCO to the O Club and bring your boss night where your NCO hosted you. The O Club had a class 6 package store that sold bottled liquor.

 

During a Korean tour near retirement I realized that everything I was doing for entertainment involved drink. Wow I'm on my way to Alcoholism !!! I cut way down. 

 

I really loved the old wooden O Club at Ft Lewis in the 60's.

 

Paul

Salome, AZ



#7 willysmb44

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:19 AM

FYI, the O club at Lewis transitioned away from being that while I was stationed there, sometimes about 2000 or so...

#8 Bob Hudson

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:58 AM

My dad used to talk about the old Navy CPO's who'd leave for lunch at the Chief's club and never come back.  Now the "Chiefs club" at NAS North Island does not even open until 3:30 except on Friday, closes at 9 PM and is closed on the weekend.

 

cpo.jpeg

 

When I was at the Presidio of Monterey in the 60's, they had an enlisted club that I seem to recall had a great view of Monterey Bay and poured strong drinks and lots of them. It was quite a slog up the hill to the barracks after that. I was 17 or maybe just turned 18 then, but no one ID'ed.

 

Now the Marines, for one, may test you first thing in the morning and if you had too much the night before you could fail the test:

 

"The Alcohol Screening Program was introduced in January 2013, when commanders began administering breathalyzer to on-duty to officers and enlisted personnel, typically when they reported to work in the morning. That, officials hoped, would discourage Marines from drinking late into the night during the week."



#9 willysmb44

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:51 PM

I got my gold bar for O-1 in 1998 (at the age of 28, so I got lot of that out of my system before I signed on) and even then, I could see the "going to the club for drinks" every Friday night was a thing of the past, even then.
Probably stems from when DUIs became a really big deal for the law and in popular culture, or maybe an extension of the PC culture.
Frankly, I was happy that I wasn't expected to go drinking with the other officers every weekend and that alcohol wasn't as big a deal by then. I never was a big drinker, as I never liked the out of control feeling anyway.
I think the military is WAY better off without that culture.

#10 Manchu Warrior

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 03:21 PM

I find this to an interesting topic and I was reading online about what happened to the clubs and I read the term "deglamorization of alcohol" by the US military several times. I was wondering when the "deglamorization" effort began and how things were when I was in the Army. I hope not to get to far off track or high jack the thread. With that said when I was in alcohol abuse was a serious issue that was for the most part, in my humble opinion, ignored by the chain of command.  Maybe it was an infantry thing but if the soldiers in my unit were not on duty the majority of them were usually plastered. I would venture to say that at any given time at least 1/4 of the soldiers in my platoon were on some level of the ADAPT Program. I will never forget when my unit would call an alert at 0330 on a Saturday morning when at least half if not more of the soldiers were legally intoxicated. To include many of the ones that were moving the 30 ton BFV's into battle positions somewhere on or around Camp Casey. Just to make it clear I am not passing judgement I'm simply recalling how it really was and I really hope things have changed for the better.

 

These whiskey labels I have must be from when the US Military was still glamorizing alcohol.

club 1.jpg club 2.jpg



#11 RustyCanteen

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 05:33 PM

This is an interesting thread, great discussion.

 

RC



#12 USARV72

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:40 PM

My, how times have changed. Remember all the clubs from Ft Campbell, A.P.G., Oakland, and just about every base in Vietnam and Ft. Bragg.The AF had it made. We would drive 100 miles round trip to go to an AF club just to make a sandwich with mayo, we never had mayo. And then there were the steaks!!! Custom cooked! The officers club on Long Binh was supose to be a secret, but everyone knew what it was. They had china, real silverware and cloth napkins.
Back in the 80's-90's our WWII reenactment group contracted with the Ft. Story O Club for dinners, everyone dressed out in original dress uniforms, even some of the Germans, those were the days.

#13 Bob Hudson

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:31 AM

I knew some ladies back in the day who just loved going to the O club at Miramar when Top Gun was still there. 

 

topgunclub.jpeg



#14 gwb123

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 03:30 PM

Bob, I look at that photo and ask "What could possibly go wrong?"  LOL!



#15 RustyCanteen

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 06:13 PM

I do not think there were many John Wayne films set-in WWII that did not have at least one Officer's Club scene. ;)



#16 Bob Hudson

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:28 PM

I do not think there were many John Wayne films set-in WWII that did not have at least one Officer's Club scene. ;)

 

Giood call...




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