Jump to content


Photo

Post your family's Civil War history/artifacts/photos


  • Please log in to reply
92 replies to this topic

#51 67Rally

67Rally
  • Members
    • Member ID: 9,529
  • 3,297 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State

Posted 19 September 2012 - 05:20 AM

My GGG Grandfather, Corporal Jarius Heilig (1837-1905) enlisted, for a three-year term on September 19, 1861 in Philadelphia, into "F" Company, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment, 70th Pennsylvania Volunteers. This cavalry regiment would carry as its primary weapon, the lance, rather than the carbine. In command was Colonel Richard Rush (grandson of Dr. Benjamin Rush, a Declaration signer).

Jarius served with his unit in the following Actions, Battles and Skirmishes:
  • Skirmish, Garlick's Landing, Pamunkey River, VA June 13, 1862
  • Seven Days Battles, VA June 25-July 1, 1862
  • Battles, Gaines Mill, Cold Harbor, Chickahominy, VA June 27, 1862
  • Battle, Glendale, Frazier's Farm, Charles City Crossroads, New Market Crossroads, Willis Church, VA June 30, 1862
  • Battle, Malvern Hill, Crew's Farm, VA July 1, 1862
  • Skirmishes, Falls Church, VA Sept. 2-4, 1862
  • Skirmish, South Mountain, MD Sept. 13, 1862
  • Skirmish, Jefferson, MD, Sept. 13, 1862
  • Action, Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown, and Blackford's Ford (Boteler's Ford) and Williamsport, MD, Sept. 19, 1862
  • Actions, Bloomfield and Upperville, VA, Nov. 2-3, 1862
During a march from New Baltimore to Stafford Court (Virginia in November of 1862, Heilig sustained an injury to his left leg when he was kicked by a horse (as detailed on his discharge certificate) injuring his knee and causing a chronic, debilitating inflammation. The condition persisted for a period of 60 days prompting the medical staff to recommend his subsequent discharge from service, which was confirmed by company and regimental staff officers on February 3, 1863.

But the disability was not to be the end of his service:

"That after being discharged on Feb. 3rd 1863, I re-enlisted for one (1) month in service of the State of Pennsylvania in what was known as Ringold (sic) Battery - Captain Ermentrout (known as the Ringgold Light Artillery of Reading, commanded by Captain William C. Ermentrout), when General Lee invaded the state - I was still very lame at this time but I offered my services as Cannonier and was accepted."

Posted Image
Posted Image

Unfortunately, my family has no photos of Jarius (yet). His son, my GG Grandfather, inherited his personal effects (as set forth in Jarius' will) but it is unclear if they were ever sent to him as he had moved to Washington Territory in the 1880s and it looks as though his siblings had lost contact. I am hoping that someday, one of my distant cousins would surface with a photo of him. Thanks to forum member mvmhm for heading over to the Dayton National Cemetery and snapping some wonderful photos of my GGG grandfather's headstone!!!

In the last few weeks, I received Jarius' service and pension records from NARA. I also have the added luxury of a well-researched book that documents the day-to-day entire history of the 6th Penna Cav - Rush's Lancers - by Eric Wittenberg.

I am in the process of assembling a representative display (GAR medals, dropped small arms rounds, hat devices, etc.) to memorialize his service.

Posted Image
Jarius' cousin, Capt. George Gordon Meade, Jr. (the son of the General) was a regimental comrade in the 6th Penna Cav.

Edited by 67Rally, 19 September 2012 - 05:26 AM.


#52 24th_infantry

24th_infantry
  • Members
    • Member ID: 88,080
  • 385 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut

Posted 19 September 2012 - 07:48 AM

Don't have much time to type the story but you can research it online. My great grandfather (not sure how many greats) was General Russell Alger who later became Secretary of War under McKinley. Only way I found that out was through my family history book.

#53 tarbridge

tarbridge

    CHIEF MODERATOR

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 123
  • 15,085 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fayetteville,N.C.

Posted 20 September 2012 - 05:45 AM

Here are some of mine.

GG-Grandfather....Pvt.Isaac Williamson Co.H 46th North Carolina KIA Battle of Burgess Mill,Va.
His Brothers
Jesse Williamson Co.D 15th North Carolina
Hiram Williamson Co.D 15th North Carolina
Kelley Williamson Co.H 26th North Carolina

GG-Uncle Pvt.Allard Belin Hemingway Citadel Cadet

GG-Grandfather Noah R.Williams Co.K 38th North Carolina
His Brothers Elias Williams Co.I 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary
David Williams Co.I 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary
John Williams Co.H 26th North Carolina

GG-Uncle James Madison Gordon Co.H 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary- Captured at Culpepper Court House and died at Elmira ,NY POW camp 25 Oct.1864
GG-Uncle Thomas H.Gordon Co.H 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary(Did not survive the War)27 March 1862

GG-Uncle Joshua Brafford 10th Regt 1st NC Arty. Died 21 April 1865 Elmira,NY POW camp
GG-Uncle Nathan Brafford 10th regt 1st NC Arty
GG-Uncle Atlas Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle James Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle Robert Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle William Brafford Co.E 44th North Carolina
G-Grandfather Pvt. Eli Brafford Co.H 30th North Carolina (16 years old)Shot in the face at the Battle of Cold Harbor losing his right mandible.Survived and recuperated,worked for the Confederate Government locating and bring in Deserters.

GG-Uncle Gaston Hall Co.K 36th North Carolina 2nd Arty Scout-Captured at Ft.Fisher sent to Elmira,NY POW camp.Died March 1,1865

GG-Granfather Pvt Jonas Preston Benton Captain Mayham Wards Wacamaw Light Arty South Carolina
GG-Uncle Washington Benton 3rd Co.G 36th Regt 2nd North Carolina Arty Brunswick
GG-Uncle Meloy Benton Co.K 36th Regt 2nd North Carolina Arty Brunswick

GG-Uncle Edward Garner Co.I 19th Regt.2nd North Carolina Calvary
GG-Uncle William Garner 6th North Carolina
GG-Uncle Samuel Key 48th and 54th TN inf regt

GG-Uncle Lt.Edward Wingate Grissett Co.C 73rd Sr.Reserves
GG-George Washington Grissett CSA
GG-Grandfather Mayham W.Grissett Captain Mayham Wards Wacamaw Light Arty South Carolina
GG-Uncle John W.Vereen Sgt.Co.L 7th Regt South Carolina Inf.
GG-Uncle Joseph Dewitt Vereen Pvt.Co.E 26th Regt South Carolina

I will stop now.I Honor these Warriors of the past who dropped the plow in most cases and came to the aid of their State.



#54 Flashlarue

Flashlarue
  • Members
    • Member ID: 87,451
  • 1,318 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fayetteville, Arkansas

Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:37 AM

My Great-Great-Grandfather Coleman Younger McGarrah taken about 1862 just before he enlisted. He was a member of General Stand Waite's CSA Oklahoma Cherokee troops. He was a Private in Major Joel Bryan's, 1st BN, Lt John Miller's, E Co. The designation for the Battalion changed many times during the war from, Bryan's 1st BN to Cherokee Partisan Rangers to 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles to 2nd Mounted Volunteers. He enlisted in 1862 and served to the end of the war. General Stand Waite was the last CSA general to sign a cease fire agreement at the end of the Civil War and never surrendered.

Posted Image

Edited by Flashlarue, 21 September 2012 - 07:56 AM.


#55 Dakota

Dakota
  • Members
    • Member ID: 34,988
  • 1,522 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:59 AM

Somewhere in the lines, I only know of one person in my family that served in the CW. Thats General Ulysses S. Grant, it might because he was born in Ohio, I'm not sure. But I've heard stories about on my father's side I'm related to him. Not something you hear everyday :thumbsup:

#56 RustyCanteen

RustyCanteen

    ADMINISTRATOR

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 24,355
  • 15,517 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Earth

Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:45 PM

This is a very interesting thread!

I thought it should be brought to everyone's attention, perhaps our members have more they can add?

#57 devildog34

devildog34
  • Members
    • Member ID: 2,182
  • 2,765 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Down south

Posted 26 February 2013 - 10:55 PM

My great great grandfather George Gardner Fourre. He is the grandson of Gardner Wyman who was killed in action at the small battle of Ogdensburg in New York in 1812. George and his brother Richard enlisted from Potosi, Wisconsin. They were born in Kingston Ontario and moved to Wisconsin while quite young. They both enlisted in Company F of the 7th Wisconsin and became a member of the famed Iron Brigade. They saw their first action at the Wilderness campaign. From May 5 through the 7th of May, the 7th Wisconsin was heavily engaged with the 4th Georgia and 32nd North Carolina on May 5, 1864. After a horrific fight, the 7th Wisconsin was the only regiment to gain and temporarily hold the breastworks of the infantry. Subsequent counterattacks by Confederate troops were extremely costly. The regiment made their way out of the Wilderness by the morning of May 8th and took up position at Laurel Hill. From May 8 to the 12, Maj. Gen. Governeur Warren's V Corps including the Iron Brigade attacke south against Confederate positions repeatedly and each time were repulsed. On the 12th as the 7th Wisconsin attacked George Fourre and his brother Richard were both wounded. A musket round amputated the last three fingers of George Fourre's hand. Richard had his thumb blown off. I was told by a National Park ranger that many of the brigade were prone in a defalade that day and loading muskets required hands to be raised in order to ram rounds and it is very likely that they were struck. George's left hand was the one damaged. According to my grandmother who spent the last 4 years of his life with him as a little girl, he was never able to play the violin afterwards but was an avid painter and use to play Chopin records for my grandmother who also recalled he would explain his prints of Monet and other famous painters whose work he greatly admired. He was a very instrumental figure in my grandmothers life who lived until she was 96 years old in 2008.

Attached Images

  • great great grandpa fourre.jpg


#58 devildog34

devildog34
  • Members
    • Member ID: 2,182
  • 2,765 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Down south

Posted 26 February 2013 - 10:57 PM

My great great grandfather George Gardner Fourre. He is the grandson of Gardner Wyman who was killed in action at the small battle of Ogdensburg in New York in 1812. George and his brother Richard enlisted from Potosi, Wisconsin. They were born in Kingston Ontario and moved to Wisconsin while quite young. They both enlisted in Company F of the 7th Wisconsin and became a member of the famed Iron Brigade. They saw their first action at the Wilderness campaign. From May 5 through the 7th of May, the 7th Wisconsin was heavily engaged with the 4th Georgia and 32nd North Carolina on May 5, 1864. After a horrific fight, the 7th Wisconsin was the only regiment to gain and temporarily hold the breastworks of the infantry. Subsequent counterattacks by Confederate troops were extremely costly. The regiment made their way out of the Wilderness by the morning of May 8th and took up position at Laurel Hill. From May 8 to the 12, Maj. Gen. Governeur Warren's V Corps including the Iron Brigade attacke south against Confederate positions repeatedly and each time were repulsed. On the 12th as the 7th Wisconsin attacked George Fourre and his brother Richard were both wounded. A musket round amputated the last three fingers of George Fourre's hand. Richard had his thumb blown off. I was told by a National Park ranger that many of the brigade were prone in a defalade that day and loading muskets required hands to be raised in order to ram rounds and it is very likely that they were struck. George's left hand was the one damaged. According to my grandmother who spent the last 4 years of his life with him as a little girl, he was never able to play the violin afterwards but was an avid painter and use to play Chopin records for my grandmother who also recalled he would explain his prints of Monet and other famous painters whose work he greatly admired. He was a very instrumental figure in my grandmothers life who lived until she was 96 years old in 2008.


His grave in Eyota, Minnesota

Attached Images

  • Great great grandpa fourre 2.jpg


#59 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 February 2013 - 11:45 PM

A reminder to members that ancestry.com is a great source for info on Civil War vets, everything from enlistments dates to unit histories.

#60 tarbridge

tarbridge

    CHIEF MODERATOR

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 123
  • 15,085 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fayetteville,N.C.

Posted 09 September 2014 - 11:53 AM

Here are some of mine.

GG-Grandfather....Pvt.Isaac Williamson Co.H 46th North Carolina KIA Battle of Burgess Mill,Va.
His Brothers
Jesse Williamson Co.D 15th North Carolina
Hiram Williamson Co.D 15th North Carolina
Kelley Williamson Co.H 26th North Carolina

GG-Uncle Pvt.Allard Belin Hemingway Citadel Cadet

GG-Grandfather Noah R.Williams Co.K 38th North Carolina
His Brothers Elias Williams Co.I 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary
David Williams Co.I 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary
John Williams Co.H 26th North Carolina

GG-Uncle James Madison Gordon Co.H 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary- Captured at Culpepper Court House and died at Elmira ,NY POW camp 25 Oct.1864
GG-Uncle Thomas H.Gordon Co.H 19th Regt 2nd North Carolina Calvary(Did not survive the War)27 March 1862

GG-Uncle Joshua Brafford 10th Regt 1st NC Arty. Died 21 April 1865 Elmira,NY POW camp
GG-Uncle Nathan Brafford 10th regt 1st NC Arty
GG-Uncle Atlas Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle James Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle Robert Brafford Co.E 26th North Carolina
GG-Uncle William Brafford Co.E 44th North Carolina
G-Grandfather Pvt. Eli Brafford Co.H 30th North Carolina (16 years old)Shot in the face at the Battle of Cold Harbor losing his right mandible.Survived and recuperated,worked for the Confederate Government locating and bring in Deserters.

GG-Uncle Gaston Hall Co.K 36th North Carolina 2nd Arty Scout-Captured at Ft.Fisher sent to Elmira,NY POW camp.Died March 1,1865

GG-Granfather Pvt Jonas Preston Benton Captain Mayham Wards Wacamaw Light Arty South Carolina
GG-Uncle Washington Benton 3rd Co.G 36th Regt 2nd North Carolina Arty Brunswick
GG-Uncle Meloy Benton Co.K 36th Regt 2nd North Carolina Arty Brunswick

GG-Uncle Edward Garner Co.I 19th Regt.2nd North Carolina Calvary
GG-Uncle William Garner 6th North Carolina
GG-Uncle Samuel Key 48th and 54th TN inf regt

GG-Uncle Lt.Edward Wingate Grissett Co.C 73rd Sr.Reserves
GG-George Washington Grissett CSA
GG-Grandfather Mayham W.Grissett Captain Mayham Wards Wacamaw Light Arty South Carolina
GG-Uncle John W.Vereen Sgt.Co.L 7th Regt South Carolina Inf.
GG-Uncle Joseph Dewitt Vereen Pvt.Co.E 26th Regt South Carolina

I will stop now.I Honor these Warriors of the past who dropped the plow in most cases and came to the aid of their State.


Pvt Eli Brafford. ..Co H 30th North Carolina Inf.

500.jpeg

#61 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 September 2014 - 04:00 PM

Thanks for bringing this one up again - always interesting reading and I was able to fix some broken photo links.

 

Reminded me too of a client who is very New Age hip: he'd asked me to do some genealogy research for him and I found he had a direct ancestor who was a Confederate soldier.  That was not something he planned to share with anyone in his circle :)



#62 tarbridge

tarbridge

    CHIEF MODERATOR

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 123
  • 15,085 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fayetteville,N.C.

Posted 09 September 2014 - 04:11 PM

Thanks for bringing this one up again - always interesting reading and I was able to fix some broken photo links.
 
Reminded me too of a client who is very New Age hip: he'd asked me to do some genealogy research for him and I found he had a direct ancestor who was a Confederate soldier.  That was not something he planned to share with anyone in his circle :)

I was glad to revive...I was beating around ancestry and noticed someone added a photograph of my G-Grandfather who was shot in the face at Gaines Mill Virginia

#63 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 September 2014 - 04:47 PM

I got really excited with the information you sent and it got me re-interested with my own family history that I had admittedly not looked into for a very long time. And I have to be honest and say that other then me taking a few trips to the National Archives in DC, my mom was the one who had actually done all of the work. With that said I went and rooted around until I found the research that my mom had done and she actually had information on the officer that you had found. She had eliminated him simply because of his age. She had a copy of his Declaration of Recruit and John B. Henderson was from the same county in Western PA as my relatives and may very well be related to them. However, he was 23 years old in August of 1862. And my Great Great Grand Dad was 43 in the census of 1860.
 
 
As for the information pertaining to the officer in Ohio this is what I have.
Captain John Henderson Co K 18th Ohio Infantry Film number: M552 roll 47

I found the Ohio officer and he was not from PA - his pension application was filed from Ohio.
 
However, I believe I found your ancestor, a Captain from far west PA, born in 1817:
 
Troops in the Department of the Monongahela

WEST FINLEY, PA.
Pennsylvania Company (emergency militia), Capt. John Henderson

 
That matches with John Henderson of West Finley who was 43 in the 1860 census:
 
henderson1860census.jpg

 

"In 1861, John Henderson entered the Union army as a captain. 

He remained in the service until 1864, when his com- 
pany was mustered out. Mr. Henderson was early 
married to Margaret Trussell. They had six children, 
— Easter, Milton F., Sarah, Emma, Martha, and 
Oliver P. Henderson. All are still living. Milton 
F. served in the Army of the Potomac during the Re- 
bellion as a member of the Sixteenth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry. John Henderson is still following the pur- 
suit of agriculture upon his fine farm in this town- 
ship. "


#64 Manchu Warrior

Manchu Warrior
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,412
  • 3,778 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Just South of the Mason-Dixon Line

Posted 09 September 2014 - 05:16 PM

 

I found the Ohio officer and he was not from PA - his pension application was filed from Ohio.
 
However, I believe I found your ancestor, a Captain from far west PA, born in 1817:
 
Troops in the Department of the Monongahela

WEST FINLEY, PA.
Pennsylvania Company (emergency militia), Capt. John Henderson

 
That matches with John Henderson of West Finley who was 43 in the 1860 census:
 
attachicon.gifhenderson1860census.jpg

 

"In 1861, John Henderson entered the Union army as a captain. 

He remained in the service until 1864, when his com- 
pany was mustered out. Mr. Henderson was early 
married to Margaret Trussell. They had six children, 
— Easter, Milton F., Sarah, Emma, Martha, and 
Oliver P. Henderson. All are still living. Milton 
F. served in the Army of the Potomac during the Re- 
bellion as a member of the Sixteenth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry. John Henderson is still following the pur- 
suit of agriculture upon his fine farm in this town- 
ship. "

 

 

That is a rather strange coincidence because I was just reading the thread today and then this. I will have to check the work my mom had done to see if it matches. With that said I do that you have found him.  I will let you know.  Thanks!

 


Edited by Manchu Warrior, 09 September 2014 - 05:29 PM.


#65 everforward

everforward
  • Members
    • Member ID: 8,237
  • 1,960 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:3/116 country, Shenandoah Valley, Va.

Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:16 AM

I too have been doing a bunch of research with my own family tree, concentrating mainly on the Paternal and Maternal lines....so far, this is what I have from my Mom and Dad--if you counted other branches from that time period and generation, there are bunches of CSA vets in my family.

 

This is what I've found so far: (Direct paternal and maternal lines)

 

From Dad's side:

 

William Madison Simmons, Pvt. Co D. 60th Va. Inf. (4th G Uncle), KIA at 3rd Winchester 19 Sept. 1864

 

Ephriam Simmons Jr., Pvt. I Co. 62nd Va. Inf. (My 4th G Gr.Father and brother to William)

 

James Alexander Simmons, Pvt. D Co. 22nd. Va. Inf. (Brother to William Madison Simmons)

 

James Chapman Simmons, Pvt. D Co. 60th Va. Inf. (son of William Madison Simmons)

 

 

From Mom's side: (all brothers from one family)

 

John Randolph Ziegler, Pvt. E Co. 57th Va. Inf. (My GG Gr. Father, POW 24 April 1865)

 

Chesley Michael Ziegler, Sgt. K Co. 10th Va. Cav. (GG Uncle)

 

William Allen Ziegler, Pvt. E Co. 57th Va. Inf. (GG Uncle)

 

Giles Willis Ziegler, Lieutenant D Co. 24th Va. Inf. (GG Uncle)



#66 Manchu Warrior

Manchu Warrior
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,412
  • 3,778 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Just South of the Mason-Dixon Line

Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:02 AM

 

I found the Ohio officer and he was not from PA - his pension application was filed from Ohio.
 
However, I believe I found your ancestor, a Captain from far west PA, born in 1817:
 
Troops in the Department of the Monongahela

WEST FINLEY, PA.
Pennsylvania Company (emergency militia), Capt. John Henderson

 
That matches with John Henderson of West Finley who was 43 in the 1860 census:
 
attachicon.gifhenderson1860census.jpg

 

"In 1861, John Henderson entered the Union army as a captain. 

He remained in the service until 1864, when his com- 
pany was mustered out. Mr. Henderson was early 
married to Margaret Trussell. They had six children, 
— Easter, Milton F., Sarah, Emma, Martha, and 
Oliver P. Henderson. All are still living. Milton 
F. served in the Army of the Potomac during the Re- 
bellion as a member of the Sixteenth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry. John Henderson is still following the pur- 
suit of agriculture upon his fine farm in this town- 
ship. "

 

 

My Great Great Grand Daddy was born in Claysville PA which is in Washington County and he is in fact buried in West Finley. So, I would believe that you have found him. I have to wonder why I found nothing on him at the National Archives? .The information you provided also says something about the militia and the Dept. of the Monongahela. The only information I found is that with the threat of Bobby Lee coming North Lincoln created two departments in PA. The Dept. of the Monongahela being in Western PA and the Dept. of the Susquehanna in central and Eastern PA. They were created in June 1863 and combined in 1864 as the Dept. of PA and most of the Western militia was discharged and sent home. You have answered some questions and I am really really grateful and now I have more questions such as what unit John Henderson was in. I also have one other. It mentioned that his son Milton was in the 16th PA Cavalry which I am not sure if my mom knew about. With that said. He was 12 years old in 1860 so I wonder if he was a Drummer boy or did he lie about his age?  My interest has definitely peaked once again and I want to thank you for the information you have so graciously provided.  So,Thanks!

 

 



#67 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 September 2014 - 09:07 AM



. It mentioned that his son Milton was in the 16th PA Cavalry which I am not sure if my mom knew about. With that said. He was 12 years old in 1860 so I wonder if he was a Drummer boy or did he lie about his age?  

 

Here's an excerpt from Milton's bio - the full account his success out west is at http://files.usgwarc...derso370gbs.txt

 

"MILTON FILLMORE HENDERSON.  Among the most valuable citizens of a 
community are the industrial leaders, who, in seeking a market for their 
products, attract commerce to their city and furnish to others the means of 
earning a livelihood.  In this classification belonged Milton Fillmore 
Henderson, a well known lumberman, who was long a dominant figure in business 
circles of Portland. He was trained in that rigorous school which develops 
strong, self-reliant manhood and his success was the reward of a life of 
industry and rightly directed endeavor.
     A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Henderson was born in Washington county on 
the 29th of August, 1848, and was reared on the farm of his parents, John and 
Margaret (Trussell) Henderson. He attended the rural schools in the 
neighborhood of the home and assisted his father in tilling the soil. For a 
time he was a carpenter’s apprentice, becoming proficient in the work, and at 
the age of sixteen enlisted in the Union army. After the close of the Civil 
war he migrated to the west and located in Denver, Colorado. Later he 
journeyed to California and for several years was prominently identified with 
building operations in San Francisco. During that time he became familiar with 
the lumber industry and made a study of timber conditions on the Pacific 
coast. From San Francisco he went to the redwood district of California and 
built and operated a number of mills in Humboldt county. All were of 
substantial construction and the Korbell Mills are still in operation in 
Humboldt county. Although untrained he was a fine draughtsman and drew the 
plans for the mills as well as the machinery.
      In 1889 Mr. Henderson was induced to come to Portland by Mr. Therkelson 
of the North Pacific Mills, with which he was connected for six years, and 
then built the Western Mill, which was later destroyed by fire."
 
Milton joined the 16th Cavalry in Feb. 1865. He was 16, but said he was 17:
 
miltonPACWcard.jpg
 
miltonCWprofile.jpg


#68 Manchu Warrior

Manchu Warrior
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,412
  • 3,778 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Just South of the Mason-Dixon Line

Posted 11 September 2014 - 10:31 AM

 

 

Here's an excerpt from Milton's bio - the full account his success out west is at http://files.usgwarc...derso370gbs.txt

 

"MILTON FILLMORE HENDERSON.  Among the most valuable citizens of a 
community are the industrial leaders, who, in seeking a market for their 
products, attract commerce to their city and furnish to others the means of 
earning a livelihood.  In this classification belonged Milton Fillmore 
Henderson, a well known lumberman, who was long a dominant figure in business 
circles of Portland. He was trained in that rigorous school which develops 
strong, self-reliant manhood and his success was the reward of a life of 
industry and rightly directed endeavor.
     A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Henderson was born in Washington county on 
the 29th of August, 1848, and was reared on the farm of his parents, John and 
Margaret (Trussell) Henderson. He attended the rural schools in the 
neighborhood of the home and assisted his father in tilling the soil. For a 
time he was a carpenter’s apprentice, becoming proficient in the work, and at 
the age of sixteen enlisted in the Union army. After the close of the Civil 
war he migrated to the west and located in Denver, Colorado. Later he 
journeyed to California and for several years was prominently identified with 
building operations in San Francisco. During that time he became familiar with 
the lumber industry and made a study of timber conditions on the Pacific 
coast. From San Francisco he went to the redwood district of California and 
built and operated a number of mills in Humboldt county. All were of 
substantial construction and the Korbell Mills are still in operation in 
Humboldt county. Although untrained he was a fine draughtsman and drew the 
plans for the mills as well as the machinery.
      In 1889 Mr. Henderson was induced to come to Portland by Mr. Therkelson 
of the North Pacific Mills, with which he was connected for six years, and 
then built the Western Mill, which was later destroyed by fire."
 
Milton joined the 16th Cavalry in Feb. 1865. He was 16, but said he was 17:
 
 

 

 

I don't have the information in front of me but I do know that it is one of Milton's sisters that I am directly related to. With that said this is all new information that I will have to share with my mom. And once again it is much appreciated.  Thanks!

 



#69 WW2JAKE

WW2JAKE
  • Members
    • Member ID: 125,364
  • 4,546 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arizona

Posted 10 October 2014 - 02:02 AM

this is my 4th great uncles pistol he was the brother of my 4th great grandfather. his name was Michael Jefferson Bulger he lead the 47th Alabama infantry at little round top at Gettysburg where he was shot in the lung and left behind later marked as having died but was saved by union soldiers and was later traded back to the confederate army.

side note, this gun has been bouncing from collection to collection over the last how ever many years. but recently changed hands again if anyone knows who owns it please contact me i would love to see it!

now the picture of the Confederate presentation factory engraved Colt 1851 Navy to Col. Michael Jefferson Bulger of the 47th Alabama infantry.

pist.jpg pist2.jpg pist3.jpg pist1.jpg

Attached Images

  • pist1.jpg

Edited by WW2JAKE, 10 October 2014 - 02:03 AM.


#70 everforward

everforward
  • Members
    • Member ID: 8,237
  • 1,960 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:3/116 country, Shenandoah Valley, Va.

Posted 10 October 2014 - 04:10 AM

Holy Smoke, that's a beauty. What a family airloom..!!



#71 everforward

everforward
  • Members
    • Member ID: 8,237
  • 1,960 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:3/116 country, Shenandoah Valley, Va.

Posted 10 October 2014 - 04:17 AM

Here is a pic of GG Uncle Chesley M. Ziegler...K Co. 10th Va. Cavalry..enlisted 26 Jun 1861. Was a Sgt.....looks like a 1st pattern Richmond Depot Shell Jacket he's wearing.....

Attached Images

  • cz.jpg


#72 sundance

sundance
  • Members
    • Member ID: 67,879
  • 2,486 posts

Posted 24 February 2015 - 07:16 PM

  1.     My siblings and I grew up hearing about "Uncle Charlie", a private in the 140th NY Vol. Infantry. He was killed on Little Round Top in his regiment's bayonet charge down the west side of the hill ( the bayonet charge you don't hear much about). Charlie Speisberger was my Grandfather's uncle. When you read stories about the 20th Maine on Little Round Top you hear a report, before their charge, of sounds of a great fight behind them. That, supposedly, was the sound of the 140th's charge. Thankfully, he was identified and is buried in the NY section of the national cemetery.  His colonel, Patrick O'Rourke, also was killed in the charge. There is info about Charlie on the net. He was 18 years old. A family hero. ( PS. If that 1 appears in front of my story I don't know why and I can't get rid of it.)


#73 Bluehawk

Bluehawk
  • Members
    • Member ID: 3,976
  • 6,991 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 11 June 2016 - 08:11 PM

I have not thought about this for quite a spell, but will begin by listing my family members known to have participated:

 

Pvt Joel Estep (1828-1864) Co B 5th KY Inf CSA & US; 

[Pvt Estep, I learned, died in camp, of disease. The record showed he enlisted with 5th KY Inf of the CSA, and later re-enlisted with 5th KY inf of the US, if memory serves.]

 

Pvt George B. Bell (1833-1910) Co C 47th IL Inf US

 

Cpl Daniel H. Barron (1838-1910) Co B 19th TN Rgmt Inf CSA


Edited by Bluehawk, 11 June 2016 - 08:14 PM.


#74 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 June 2016 - 08:30 AM

Always good to revive this thread.



#75 338thRCT

338thRCT
  • Members
    • Member ID: 70,300
  • 1,209 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bradenton,FL

Posted 14 June 2016 - 12:13 AM

My mothers grandfather, Marion P Oneal born in Ford Co. Indiana in 1842. He and his brother Tom joined the 23rd Missouri Vol. Infantry. He received a severe neck wound while the unit was engaged at the Hornets Nest at Shiloh Apr 1862. Tom was taken prisoner and later died of disease in St Louis after a prisoner exchange. He convalesced for a year and rejoined the unit for the Atlanta campaign and was mustered out of the service in Dec. 1864 at Savannah, GA. As a teenager in the 1930's, my mother had become his caretaker during the day and she related many stories of him before she died a few years ago. She said he rarely spoke of the war, except that he was dismayed by the "cruelty" of the southern men towards their women and never forgot the image of southern women picking undigested grains of corn from the piles of Union horse poop. He married soon after the war ended and headed for California. I suppose that the violence going on in Missouri after the war may have helped with that decision.

He moved back east to Iowa after the death of his wife in 1888, eventually returning to MO. In his later life he made what we now call rustic furniture. I have one of his chairs and it is still sound and strong as the day it was made. My mother said the one evening in 1938, he refused his usual before bedtime shot of whiskey stating that he did not want to meet his maker with whiskey on his breath. He died that night. I am so glad that I was able to get these stories from my mother before she died, so that they would not be forgotten.

Attached Images

  • marion.jpg



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users