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Annoying re-enactors interacting with the public...


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I reenacted with a conspiracy nut. There was no way a person could have a normal conversation with the guy.

Black helo's, UN road codes on the back of road signs, hugh UN concentration camp somewhere in the Pacific

Northwest. THEY were coming for us all. Thing was he could never tell you who THEY were.

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Oh this drives me nuts! I work REAL HARD to keep from bringing any modern things to the WW2 side. One that REALLY drives me nuts is the ones who ALWAYS use a "modern" style of salute, it looks straight out of the 1980's instead of having a proper 1940's salute.
It’s really tough to break yourself of those things. I lucked up on the “M-4 carry” thing, as I served with a heavy mech unit and we never had M-4s and used normal slings. So we never carried like that. But as for the salutes, I’ve seen that with other timeframes. I’ve watched modern soldiers “correct” Civil War types with their (historically correct) British-style salutes and I personally have had to explain at length when in a Span-Am uniform that they saluted a totally different way at that time, to another re-enactor who was a current Army recruiter.
I resemble that remark!
Me, too. I was active duty, got out right before 9/11. My legs were messed up by then and I had a permanent no-running profile. I seriously considered going back after 9/11 but knew I wouldn’t be able to complete a PT test. Yes, it still bugs me.

 

I thought of a couple more:

 

The Eternal General: This person is a high-ranking guy in another time period of re-enacting, so he feels he “earned” that rank everywhere. He may be well-known among the Civil War guys, but his badly-put-together Patton impression is starting to wear thin among the WW2 folks.

The “I couldn’t get a babysitter” type: His wife made him look after Junior this weekend (and many other re-enacting weekends), so he cobbled together a laughable “impression” at the last minute so he can hang around. You’ve given up suggesting a historically-correct impression (like a 1940s Boy Scouts or something like that) as he won’t take the hint. And the kid acts like he’s one of you guys, often giving out bad info. Guess who’s photo always makes the newspaper?

The Surplus Store Ranger: The sad part is that this person CAN afford the right stuff, but won’t justify the expense. He always shows up with postwar (square) marmite cans, arguing that they’re a “WW2 pattern”, same as the bayonet lug on the carbine he carries. ALL his gear is OD green and some of it is likely Vietnam era if you look closely enough, because that’s what he finds in bulk.

The Quiz Master: This person is an example of what happens when someone gets tired of being a Star Trek fan. This person spends his time trolling through old field manuals, books and obscure references and spends the entire time quizzing people on the most random pieces of useless info imaginable. Even if you know how many set screws Underwood made for rifle production in 1943, he’ll just ignore your answer and go on to asking the thickness of brass used in 20MM dummy shells made in 1944. He’s utterly oblivious as to any conversations going on around him and you often wonder if he even understands there are others nearby. You can start giving funny questions right back and he’ll NEVER get the hint.

The Lone Impression guy: There may be safety in numbers, but you don’t stand out that way. This person makes a point of always showing up with something nobody else has and likely, you’ve never seen before. You have to take his word that his 1940 Greek Expeditionary Force impression is correct. (in all fairness, I think I can be accused of this).

The Hound Dog: If you’re young, female and pretty, this re-enactor will spend all day talking with you. He might have a wife somewhere, but oddly never talks about her. Deep down, he knows he doesn’t have a chance but it’s the only time they’ll talk with him.

The “back in the day” guy: He’s re-enacted or collected longer than you. Don’t worry about forgetting that, as he’ll remind you several times at each event. You’ll often hear, “Oh yeah, I remember when I would buy those for a dollar apiece” each time you show him something very rare and valuable. You’re left to wonder why he still does this if everything is so passé to him now.

The Frightener: He doesn’t work at it, but this person just creeps people out. There’s something you can’t exactly explain about the person, but everyone is creeped out by this individual. The public avoids them and people always slowly back up when talking to them. It might have something to do with him wearing SS stuff with civilian clothes when not at events.

The Attention Pit: This person didn’t get enough attention when they were a child. Or as an adult, neither. These are often the people who bring the gas-gun MG conversions and shoot them every few minutes so nobody can say they didn’t notice them. They often wind up with the best toys to bring to events, because nobody would tolerate them otherwise.

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"The Cold War Warrior: This poor soul served between wars. And he’s never gotten over the fact that he “missed” his chance. He’ll try to shoehorn his boring “laundry service aboard the destroyer I served on in the mid 80s” stories into any time he can. He might know a lot about WW2 and his collection is nice, but you get the feeling he only shows up to talk about his unrelated life."

 

Hey now! If it wasn't for all us Cold Warriors you'd all be speaking Russian, spending your summers on a Cuban Marxist commune or carrying Mao's Little Red Book... wait, that sounds like my friends from college!

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FOOD COURT FIELD MARSHALLS

I absolutely do not reenact, just collect USMC but get a kick out of reenactors sometimes. I noticed at a militaria show years ago a group of SS officers dressed in what appeared to be quality reproduction Waffen SS material sitting at a little round table in the corner of the arean gorging on chili cheese nachos and washing them down with fountain drinks. Just an out of place appearance for an SS command staff.

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He was a cool tomcat, too. Little dude knew his name, would run back from 300+ yards when called, AND shook hands. Had he not been struck down by a truck while carousing, I am certain that his kittens would have been able to use tools.

On a different note, how should a 40s salute look compared to an 80s salute?

 

I wondered about this myself... The basic salute is pretty much the same then as it is now. However... Every period seems to have come up with variations when people add their own panache, or lack the discipline to give a proper salute. I know when I served, you could tell. The squared away troops always snapped it out with an extra added panache... and the officers really ate it up... made them feel special. But the limp wristed salutes often pushed them over the edge and into tirade into how lax they and their leadership were.

 

Wayne

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo
I wondered about this myself... The basic salute is pretty much the same then as it is now. However... Every period seems to have come up with variations when people add their own panache, or lack the discipline to give a proper salute. I know when I served, you could tell. The squared away troops always snapped it out with an extra added panache... and the officers really ate it up... made them feel special. But the limp wristed salutes often pushed them over the edge and into tirade into how lax they and their leadership were.

 

Wayne

 

 

While the field manual from WWII has the same standards for the hand salute as it was when I was in- generally you just didn't see an exacting parade ground salute during wwii. The "panache" of how to wear headgear tilted and lacksadasical saluting was common and accepted during wwii.

 

Here's mine:

 

Reenactor asking dumb questions: Fox Company of the 506th Veteran at a museum event- A grubby reenactor walks up and out of nowhere blurts out; "SO, do you think Lt. So and SO killed all those German Prisoners on DDay?!" The Veteran wasn't in Easy Company and wouldn't care to talk about such an event if he did see it.

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Itsy, I think I fall into the "pervert" gauge, I love women :thumbsup:

 

Here's one..."I done it for real" guy:

 

"Wot, like ye stormed ashore from a landing craft*/sat in a waterlogged trench with a barbed wire "no man's land"**/climbed an Italian mountain in full blast of winter*** with hundreds of yer fellow troopers getting shot and blown to bits by veteran, well trained and well equipped weapons as good as or even better than yours? I don't think so buddy... This guy would fit in with the "cold War" guy...

 

The guy can also be either ex British Army who served in North Ireland^ or the first and second Gulf War*^ and try and tell ye he can relate to the mind set and suffering of a conscripted "citizen soldier" young kid or married man from 1940s Britain, or even the USA...

 

* North Africa, Italy and northern and southern France...

 

** Anzio...

 

*** The Italian Campaign...

 

 

^ I don't think sitting in yer barracks for five days then going out on patrol for a day, or walking down the Shankhill Road is the same as WWII experience wotsoever...

 

*^ Cetainly not in the case of a professional British Army, or even a consripted US army "fighting" the Iraqi Army :think:

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Here's one..."I done it for real" guy
This is something you see mostly among those with AB impressions for some reason. I have talked with WW2 AB vets, and the majority agree that someone who jumped in Peacetime (usually just the 5 jumps for the wings at Benning) from a C-141 or C-17 at 1000FT AGL in training conditions is NOT the same as those who went out the door in C-47s under heavy fire into hostile lands.

But try telling the modern “five jump chump” re-enactor that. You’ll never make a lifetime enemy faster, I assure you of that!

I never went to jump school (I put in for it several times but I was in a non-AB unit in the pre-9/11 Army), but I would never presume to think that I’m on the same level as the WW2 vets who wore the same shoulder patches I wore decades after WW2. To me, if you weren’t actually in WW2, you’re a wanna-be (in the context of being a WW2 soldier), regardless of any arguments you can bring up because nobody has had that experience since the war ended to that degree. I have no problems admitting to myself or others than I’m not the same as the WW2 versions of what I did on active duty. I have no idea why so many re-enactors are living in utter denial on that point.

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Itsy, I think I fall into the "pervert" gauge, I love women :thumbsup:

 

Nah there's a big difference between the guys like you and the creepers :thumbsup:

 

-Sarah

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May I offer for your consideration "supernova" - this individual joins a group or forum , posts on their forum 24/7, for days and hours on end, buys all the kit he needs and then some, despite being told not, does one (maybe) event, and then decides it, "not for them" and you never hear from them again! Supernova shines so brightly , promises so much and yet burns out equally as quickly.

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This is something you see mostly among those with AB impressions for some reason. I have talked with WW2 AB vets, and the majority agree that someone who jumped in Peacetime (usually just the 5 jumps for the wings at Benning) from a C-141 or C-17 at 1000FT AGL in training conditions is NOT the same as those who went out the door in C-47s under heavy fire into hostile lands.

But try telling the modern “five jump chump” re-enactor that. You’ll never make a lifetime enemy faster, I assure you of that!

I never went to jump school (I put in for it several times but I was in a non-AB unit in the pre-9/11 Army), but I would never presume to think that I’m on the same level as the WW2 vets who wore the same shoulder patches I wore decades after WW2. To me, if you weren’t actually in WW2, you’re a wanna-be (in the context of being a WW2 soldier), regardless of any arguments you can bring up because nobody has had that experience since the war ended to that degree. I have no problems admitting to myself or others than I’m not the same as the WW2 versions of what I did on active duty. I have no idea why so many re-enactors are living in utter denial on that point.

 

 

Lee

Great post.

 

Band of Brothers comes to mind.Buy the DVD and live the dream.No matter what these guys seem to think they were/are in the circle when in reality they are part of the slip stream.

 

RD

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The Klingon-,,,I can not forget that one,,its great :)

 

 

Klingon/Clingon or TP Commando as they all stick like toilet paper.

 

Also the INTERUPTER

 

Not a re-enactor but these guys pop up everywhere.Reallly annoying when you are at a show either set up with a display or as a vendor and the INTERUPTOR comes up and jumps into your space while you are talking with the public,potential customer or trying to buy an item from a potential seller.They cant help them selves frpm spouting all their gained internet knowledge and what the item is and sells for from an on line reputable dealer.

 

RON

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May I offer for your consideration "supernova" - this individual joins a group or forum , posts on their forum 24/7, for days and hours on end, buys all the kit he needs and then some, despite being told not, does one (maybe) event, and then decides it, "not for them" and you never hear from them again! Supernova shines so brightly , promises so much and yet burns out equally as quickly.

 

Paul... Would that guy be in the same league as a Brown Dwarf?

:lol:

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oskar_2ndchev
May I offer for your consideration "supernova" - this individual joins a group or forum , posts on their forum 24/7, for days and hours on end, buys all the kit he needs and then some, despite being told not, does one (maybe) event, and then decides it, "not for them" and you never hear from them again! Supernova shines so brightly , promises so much and yet burns out equally as quickly.

 

One variation of this is when they go away, they don't bother telling anyone, they just disappear and the only indication of their leaving is when they put their gear up for sale on another board.

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You forgot the Video game/movie historian

 

These people are everywhere, and they only know what they have played in "call of duty" or "medal of honor" and keep asking you if you have a kilishnacoff on display with all your ww2 weapons... Or that if it was not like on Band of brothers or saving private ryan: IT MUST BE WRONG.....

 

 

How do these people keep finding me? And why do they always want to be........

 

the expensive weapon grabber

 

Before I start sounding like Rollin from atthefront in a rant, but maybe their parents did not beat them enough when they picked up other peoples property with out asking, but there are a lot of these people these days.... They think just because your $2500 + thompson replica is on display that they MUST be there for them to pick it up...

The "do not touch" sign, the angry looking man with the loaded 1911 (Me) or all the muzzles pointing toward them is not an indication...

 

Manners and civility seem to have lapsed into a coma recently....

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This is something you see mostly among those with AB impressions for some reason. I have talked with WW2 AB vets, and the majority agree that someone who jumped in Peacetime (usually just the 5 jumps for the wings at Benning) from a C-141 or C-17 at 1000FT AGL in training conditions is NOT the same as those who went out the door in C-47s under heavy fire into hostile lands.

But try telling the modern “five jump chump” re-enactor that. You’ll never make a lifetime enemy faster, I assure you of that!

I never went to jump school (I put in for it several times but I was in a non-AB unit in the pre-9/11 Army), but I would never presume to think that I’m on the same level as the WW2 vets who wore the same shoulder patches I wore decades after WW2. To me, if you weren’t actually in WW2, you’re a wanna-be (in the context of being a WW2 soldier), regardless of any arguments you can bring up because nobody has had that experience since the war ended to that degree. I have no problems admitting to myself or others than I’m not the same as the WW2 versions of what I did on active duty. I have no idea why so many re-enactors are living in utter denial on that point.

 

 

True to a point. At least they REALLY jumped! I always got tired of the ones that strut around and NEVER been IN an airplane let alone jump!

 

Scott

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I tried reading through these fast and don't know if it has been touched on. I'm not sure what an appropriate name would be, but perhaps the Wannabe in mind, but not in body

 

I don't want to pick on anyone if this person is here, but I can't say I've ever a photo of a 275-300 pound paratrooper in the 82nd. They don't seem to be doing a lot of physical training. That's for sure. These reenactors exist we have all seen them! Here is different example. If you are from NC and frequent the military shows lately you probably have seen him. There is this young kid (meaning possibly 18) that wears a WWII Marine uniform that has long shaggy hair and sports a goatee. I want to choke this guy every time I see him. He says the only reason he wears the uniform to the show is to get in for free. Grrrrr.....

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I've often wondered if someone should be posted at the entrance so that only legit reenactors get free admittance.

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I've often wondered if someone should be posted at the entrance so that only legit reenactors get free admittance.

Good point. At an airshow my group does a large display at, we get people with highly questionable impressions (if you could call them that) and just walk in, so they don't have to pay gate admission. They don't really try to be re-enactors as such, but just wanna walk around in a uniform that is quite off indeed. It's annoying to those of us who have put a great deal of time, effort and money...

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Ohhh... you have me t these "people" too?!?!?!.. I thought they were like gnomes or elves, symptoms of over indulgence or not enough sleep or having to many firearms discharged in close proximity of ones head...

 

So I am not crazy.....

 

When we were running the ft wane detroit event a few of these "people" showed up... A few even brought "weapons" and wanted to participate! No unit, no affiliation, dummy guns and we are not even sure what their impression is...

 

That is ok, I went to the Iraqi school of charm and tact... If I caught one, the situation was {cough, cough}....rectified, Yet strike one down, yet another appears....

 

 

Truly frightening...

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Hey DirtEater,

I just read what was on your post, Support your local gunsmith...till it breaks.

That is so neat. I wish I had that on a T-Shirt. :thumbsup:

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Good point. At an airshow my group does a large display at, we get people with highly questionable impressions (if you could call them that) and just walk in, so they don't have to pay gate admission. They don't really try to be re-enactors as such, but just wanna walk around in a uniform that is quite off indeed. It's annoying to those of us who have put a great deal of time, effort and money...

 

 

THAT'S why at Midland we have an area that the reenactors HAVE to sign in at.

 

Scott

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