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Knowledge request WW1 USMC Forrest Greens HQ Co. 6th Marines AEF


usmc1981
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Hey guys, just picked up this 1919-1920 USMC Forrest Greens with HQ, 6th Marine Regiment patch.  The patch is the standard German star on black velvet background.  Was wondering if there are other patched examples with a QM stamp date of 1919-20?  I know this is late in the game, but understand the stamp refers to "quartermaster year" and if same as "physical year" would have begun 1 July 1919.  I also know the 6th Regiment was deactivated 12 August, which leaves a very small window for this tunic's active service.  This Marine may have lasted longer than 13 Aug as a member of HQ company, tightening up paperwork for the unit.  This tunic also could have been a late entry for the need of a uniform while marching in the Washington DC parade for the regiment.  Either way, the patch has been there forever, it has that sucked in effect and rides the wrinkles.  The collars have evidence of the use of EGA Collar disk, and there may be a shadow of oversea chevrons.  

 

My question?  Are there other known QM dated1919-1920 "PATCHED' tunics? 

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All of my coats are on mannequins so its tough for me to check. In the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember that the 1919 coats had a stitch line at the base of the collar like yours. Can anyone confirm that? I swear I would be brilliant if not for a poor memory. I did check all of my tunics and don’t see a visible stitch line at the bottom of the collar like yours.

 

Having said that,  I think you might have nailed it with the tunics so stamped issued in the preparation for the parades in Washington and New York when they got home. I have one or two very minty ones patched up (one a Fifth Marine HQ named as part of a larger grouping) that look like they were worn only once or twice, again I assume likely for the parades. Here is a photo below, again no stitch line at bottom of collar. I have another coat where the sleeve lining was removed. Washington DC must have been sweltering on August 12th. Yard longs show the Capitol building with windows open. 

 

You ask a good question here and it will be interesting to see if there are other 1919-1920 coats patched up out there. I suspect there might be. Yours looks like a nice one....beautiful patch BTW. Kevin

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Thanks Kevin, I appreciate your response.  True about NY and DC in August, as this coat is somewhat minty, but has some sweat stains in liner.  As for the stitch line in collar, I thought I read somewhere that was only in 1919, or maybe for 1919-1920 year only?   I'll have to reread.

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Found this on forum.

 

cwnorma

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Location: Texas

#6  

Posted February 10, 2007

Pat,

 

The 1912 USMC Forrest Green coat went through several iterations.

 

From 1912 to 1917, the coat was manufactured without lower pockets.

 

From 1917-1919, The coats had lower pockets

 

In 1919-1920, a single row of stitching was added to the bottom of the collar where it attaches to the tunic. There were other slight manufacturing modifications, but that is the most obvious.

 

In 1920-1921, sewn eyelets were added for the collar insignia

 

Many of the Pre 1917 tunics were retrofitted with lower pockets, so it is not inconcievable that an earlier tunic would have the pockets.

 

After 1921 I am not sure what modifications happened as that is outside my area.

 

Chris

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42 minutes ago, warguy said:

All of my coats are on mannequins so its tough for me to check. In the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember that the 1919 coats had a stitch line at the base of the collar like yours. Can anyone confirm that? I swear I would be brilliant if not for a poor memory. I did check all of my tunics and don’t see a visible stitch line at the bottom of the collar like yours.

 

Having said that,  I think you might have nailed it with the tunics so stamped issued in the preparation for the parades in Washington and New York when they got home. I have one or two very minty ones patched up (one a Fifth Marine HQ named as part of a larger grouping) that look like they were worn only once or twice, again I assume likely for the parades. Here is a photo below, again no stitch line at bottom of collar. I have another coat where the sleeve lining was removed. Washington DC must have been sweltering on August 12th. Yard longs show the Capitol building with windows open. 

 

You ask a good question here and it will be interesting to see if there are other 1919-1920 coats patched up out there. I suspect there might be. Yours looks like a nice one....beautiful patch BTW. Kevin

A300D2CD-2172-4FFA-B8E6-55EAB9049B25.jpeg

Kevin you may be able to check your tunics without removing from mannequin.  Just see if they have the collar stitch line.

 

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ferris055

I have one that has the 1919-1920 date inside as well.  The stitching looks correct and the patch looks original (as far as I can tell).  I know the black light isn't the end all be all, but it does not have modern stitching.  It does have collar disks on it and I am not sure about the cross rifle patch (doesn't glow either).  I am guessing it was worn post-war in parades, but who knows when the patch was put on there.

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devildog34

These Forrest green uniforms were issued in most all cases upon the return to Quantico in July/August 1919.  So an overwhelming majority of these green coats are post-war issue.  I’ll never say all because absolutes are dangerous but the overwhelming majority of WWI enlisted were processed out and were reissued green uniforms following the AEF mandate that kept Marines in army uniforms during the war and post-war occupation.  The 4th and 5th Brigade were under the army supply system in France and in turn wore Army pattern coats.  Once back in the states the Matined were back under USMC command and this is when most of these army pattern coats are replaced.  If you look at post WWI occupation photos an overwhelming majority are wearing army pattern coats.  The 1918-19 QK stamp would be appropriate.   The crossed rifles are WWI Pfc ranks.  A wartime grade that emerged.  Patches in these coats was also a post war addition.  Most transferred their patches or put new ones on but not long after returning to USMC command SSIs were discontinued.  This coat is in the correct configuration you’d see for a Marine discharged out of Quantico who served with 1/5 in France.  As to the originalIty it’s hard to say without having it in hand.  Hope this helps

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ferris055

That makes sense. Thank you. Very informative and I’m learning every day. 

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