Jump to content

Help identifying a cartridge belt?


Recommended Posts

You have a M1912 Cartridge Belt that was made by Russell c. 1917-1918. Your belt lacks the hardware for

attaching to, and retaining a cavalryman's rifle.

 

Early specimens, olive drab in color and having eagle snaps on its pockets, are very rare. The WWI types,

like yours, produced by both Mills and Russell are relatively common. Because your belt is missing its hardware,

it's not as desirable to a collector, but it is what it is.

 

 

 

 

 

post-1529-0-05467100-1573782258_thumb.jpg

donation2009.gif
Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a M1912 Cartridge Belt that was made by Russell c. 1917-1918.   Your belt lacks the hardware for

attaching to, and retaining a cavalryman's rifle.  

 

Early specimens, olive drab in color and having eagle snaps on its pockets, are very rare.   The WWI types,

like yours, produced by both Mills and Russell are relatively common.    Because your belt is missing its hardware,

it's not as desirable to a collector, but it is what it is.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know if these belts were ever used as normal cartridge belts or were they just stored, the unfinished ones anyway.

 

Sent from my SM-J327V using Tapatalk

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The M1912 cavalry rifle cartridge belt (Cartridge Belt, Caliber .30 Cavalry),
like the cavalry M1912 ration bag, were ordered in quantity in anticipation
of the eventual entry of the US into Europe's Great War. The equipment board
intended to standardize equipment across the US ground forces, so it made these
prior dedicated cavalry troop accouterments available to infantry regiments, as
well as to cavalry troops.

Cavalry were suitable forces for use on the American western frontier; however,
against the overlapping fields of fire of German machine guns behind walls of
barbed wire on the European front, the cavalry were quickly becoming an
anachronism. Cavalry troops of the AEF fought dismounted as infantry, so much
of the hastily ordered equipment was re-purposed. The ration bag M1912 was
used by the medical corps, and many can be found with F.H. (Field Hospital),
A.C. (Ambulance Corps), or caduceus markings. Many of the WWI produced 1912
cavalry cartridge belts, like yours, are found with the hardware removed or

never attached, as these belts were likely re-purposed as suitable for training,

or issuance to state guards.

Do you know if these belts were ever used as normal cartridge belts or were
they just stored, the unfinished ones anyway.


These belts were produced by Mills and Russell, and furnished to Rock Island
Arsenal where the leather frog, hook component, and rifle ring were attached.
A large number of these belts can be found that have never had their hardware
attached. (I have one of those too.) These belts were produced in quantities
greater than the number of cavalry troops; therefore, they were likely re-purposed
for training by removing their hardware. There was too much need for these to
have been stored when the equipping of the AEF was creating critical shortages
in domestic training camps.

They would not have gone to Europe with the AEF.








 

donation2009.gif
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.