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A.E.F. Gloves, Gauntlets & Mittens 1917 to 1919


world war I nerd
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Your posts are amazing! Thank you. At one point in my career I created military bronzes and GI Joe prototypes. Information from all of your posts would have been invaluable.

Dick

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world war I nerd

Dick, thanks for looking at and commenting on the post. It is much appreciated.

 

My goal when writing posts such as this is to hopefully provide information that will help collectors or modelers or artists or historians or whoever get the correct gear on time specific displays or other projects.

 

I'm guessing that most collectors interested in accuracy wouldn't want late war clothing or equipment on an early war Doughboy display.

 

As previously mentioned these posts are the result of the effort of a number of very helpful individuals. There's no way that I could have written this or any of my previous posts without their assistance. One of whom, I forgot to name at the beginning of this post ...

 

Sorry Glen, your forum user name of Trenchrat slipped my mind when I hastily wrote the opening paragraph just before posting!

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B,

 

No worries...! Glad my pictures helped you out...

 

Terrific job, once again. Who knew there were that many differing gloves, gauntlets, mittens, etc, etc, etc,....

Glenn

 

p.s., once again I will ask...what's next??

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world war I nerd

Thanks for looking at the post Glen.

 

As for what's next, I'm not entirely sure. There's still much to choose from. What I write about usually boils down to whether or not I have enough reliable information along with a suitable array of images to adequately illustrate the text. It also need to be something I feel like writing about ...

 

I'm open to suggestions if you have any?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I am happy to help. I had accidentally stumbled upon the screen shot while searching for the French colorized film "Apocalypse"

 

 

That's exactly what it is.

 

I've searched and searched for a photo of the thing being used, but could never find one.

 

Thanks so much for adding it!

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

All...

Here is a photo showing what is likely the shoulder pad worn my machine gunners of the AEF. It is clear the gunner has a leather strap over his left shoulder...

Also of note are the bolo knives worn in lieu of the entrenching tool on the haversack...

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world war I nerd

Glen, I suspect that the machine gunner is indeed wearing the French made chain mail shoulder pad. Nice catch, and thanks for posting the photo … the first I’ve ever seen of the pad being used by Doughboys.

 

A couple excerpts borrowed from “The Artillerymen: The Impressions of an American Artillery Regiment in the World War. 129th F.A. (35th Division) 1917-1919”, Lee J. McIlvaine, 1920. Both mentioned the use of “oil gloves” and “gas proof gloves” for “use in handling gas-tainted material.”

 

The first reference dates to August of 1917 when the regiment was attending the French artillery school at Coeqtuidan. The second reference took place during the Meuse-Argonne offensive, which took place in November of 1918:

 

A less enjoyable incident to the training was one required by brigade orders – that of wearing the gas mask at least one hour every day. An A.E.F. gas officer with supplies and equipment was stationed in camp; and while we were there, every officer and man in the regiment was required to go through the “Gas House” as a test of his mask. All men needing new masks were refitted; and horse respirators and oil gloves for use in handling gas-tainted material, were issued.

Lee J. McIlvaine, 129th Artillery Regiment, 35th Division, AEF

 

(Gas NCO’s): They were responsible, in their respective organizations, under the supervision of their captains, for seeing that every man had a well-fitting mask, in good order; for training the men in their use and care; for looking after the gas defense in each position, such as gas-proofing of dugouts, installation of gas alarms, keeping on hand a supply of lime for neutralizing mustard gas and of gas proof gloves for handling gas infected material, and of all the other equipment for gas protection; and lastly, the highly important duty of constantly, night and day, maintaining gas guards, who would give the alarm when occasion demanded it.

Lee J. McIlvaine, 129th Artillery Regiment, 35th Division, AEF (page148)

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Another outstanding, encyclopedic post Brian, Thank you sir!

 

I have what I think are 2 pairs of Siberian/N.Russia mittens, one pair with the beautiful fur covered exterior very similar to what have already documented here. They are ink-stamped on the thumb leather: Insp. No.5, QMC Seattle,General Dept. The other pair is quite different, the exterior is all leather(supposed to be horsehide) and has a light colored knit lining in the palm and finger area with the gauntlet being unlined. Both pairs appear unissued. I have no reference for these but put them on here for comment or additional information. Thanks again for your efforts to enlighten us.

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world war I nerd

GWS, Thanks for adding your mittens to the thread ... hopefully your additions will encourage others to do likewise.

 

The russet colored leather mittens appear to be 1918 Leather Mittens. Despite the fact that they were not actually adopted until April of 1918, I've seen several other pairs with 1917 contract dates. I don't think that this indicates that the mittens were actually made in 1917. I'm pretty sure that rather than accepting bids for an urgently needed piece of clothing or equipment, existing government contract from diverted from a garment that was not deemed critical to to another that was urgently required.

 

I've noticed other WW I garments that had contract labels (or stamps) which pre-dated the date on which the article was adopted by the Army. To me, this suggests that altering or diverting contracts for Army clothing was a practice that was commonly employed during the war.

 

I'm still in the process of trying to piece together exactly what clothing was procured for the American forces that were dispatched to Siberia & North Russia. However, the fur covered mittens you posted compare favorably to other examples seen in period photographs. The west coast inspector stamp is also a plus as all of the troops & equipment shipped to Russia passed through depots like San Francisco & Seattle located on the west rather than the east coast.

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  • 1 month later...
world war I nerd

I recently received these pics of a pair of 1913 Riding Gloves that were recently added to forum member Dragoon's collection. At the time of posting no images of the riding gloves were available, so these photos fill that gap very nicely ... Thanks Kurt.

 

From left to right, front of the glove, contract stamp dated May 11, 1914 and size 9 1/2 stamp on the inner cuff, close up of the adjustment strap & glove fastener, and the front of the glove.

 

Photos courtesy of the Dragoon collection

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  • 7 months later...

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1185 Riding Gloves manufactured for US Government by Joseph N Eisendrath Co., Chicago. Photographed October 1918

 

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748 Horsehide Glove manufactured for US Government by Joseph N Eisendrath Co., Chicago. Photographed August 1918

 

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1306 Heavy Leather Glove manufactured for US Government by Joseph N Eisendrath Co., Chicago. Photographed August 5, 1918

 

 

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1319 One Finger Mitten manufactured for US Government by Joseph N Eisendrath Co., Chicago. Photographed August 5, 1918

1306 Heavy Leather Glove manufactured for US Government by Joseph N Eisendrath Co., Chicago. Photographed August 5, 1918

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Gloves and mittens made for the government by Boss Manufacturing, Kewanee, Illinois. Numbers 6 and 7 used for handling barbed wire.

 

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Spec No. 1185 Riding gloves and Spec No. 1319 leather one finger mittens made for the US Army by Richard Evans and Co, Johnstown, NY

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Army mittens made by Gauss-Langenberg Hat Company, St. Louis, MO, photographed July 1918

 

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Spec No. 972 Winter Gauntlets manufactured by Joseph N. Eisendrate Co., Chicago. Photographed August 1918

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

post-208068-0-43417500-1545299967.jpgHere is my first addition to the glove category. This a photo of Norman B Brown. When he left Philadelphia for France with the 5th Marines he was assigned to the supply company. In August he was transferred to the 8th Machine Gun company of the 5th Regiment; where he served until he died March 2 1919. The Photo was taken sometime before going into the line in 1918. He kept writing about getting back to send it home.

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