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Congressional Space Medal Of Honor For Sale


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#1 DMD

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 02:04 PM

A California auction house is offering Ed White's posthumous Congressional Space Medal of Honor. White performed the first space walk during the Gemini program and died in the Apollo 1 fire.

http://www.regencyst...ic.php?lot=0309

From the Regency-Superior listing:

"This medal was authorized by the US Congress in 1969 to recognize Ďany astronaut who in the performance of his duties has distinguished himself by exceptional meritorious efforts and contributions to the welfare of the Nation and mankindí. It is awarded by the President on recommendation from the NASA Administrator. The award is a civilian award that is a separate decoration from the Medal of Honor, which is a military award for extreme bravery and gallantry in combat. This award may be worn on military uniforms following all US Armed Forces decorations. To be awarded this decoration, an astronaut must perform feats of extraordinary accomplishment while participating in actual space flight under NASA authority. This decoration may be awarded for extreme bravery during a space emergency or in preventing a major space disaster, or may be presented posthumously to those astronauts who died in the line of duty while performing a US space mission. This is the rarest of all space medals and by far the rarest Medal of Honor. Only 28 decorations have been awarded by the President in Congressí name. These have been awarded posthumously to the Crews of Apollo 1, Challenger (STS 51L) and Columbia (STS 107) as well as to Neil Armstrong, Frank Borman, Pete Conrad, John Glenn, Alan Shepard, John Young, Tom Stafford, James Lovell, Shannon Lucid, William Shepard and Roger Crippen. The award we have the honor of offering was presented to Ed White III in 1997 in his fatherís name for making Americaís first EVA and for Apollo 1."

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#2 KurtA

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 05:31 AM

Wow! If I was a lottery winner, I'd be all over this one! What do we predict on a final bid? $50,000-$60,000?
Kurt

#3 wartimecollectables.com

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 08:46 AM

An incredible piece of history!

#4 M60 Driver

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 07:04 PM

I am a bit surprised that this medal does not fall under the same laws that bar the sale of military congressional Medals of Honor.

#5 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 07:34 PM

I am a bit surprised that this medal does not fall under the same laws that bar the sale of military congressional Medals of Honor.



If this medal sale gets much publicity I'm sure someone will call for a closure to the legislative " loophole ".

Kurt

#6 wartimecollectables.com

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 03:25 AM

SOLD! Hammer price ... $80,000.00.
I threw a $12K bid in just in case it slipped through the cracks.
I was rather an underbidder :D

#7 JBFloyd

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 07:34 AM

It opened at $50k, which is beyond my weekly allowance!

#8 hhbooker2

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 07:58 AM

It is really a civilian government employee medal, not necessarily given to member of the armed frorces even though they too can get the medal, yes? Perhaps by emphasising the important of the MEDAL OF HONOR instead of including others as before, the MOH carries greater weight? It may be called a Medal of Honor, but are the risks the same under combat conditions? I wonder who designed the medal, looks like something from Buck Rogers or Flash Gordon?

#9 JBFloyd

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 10:48 AM

It's a NASA medal awarded to civilians and military in NASA programs, and while it doesn't get the press coverage the military Medals of Honor get, it seems to be given for equal risks. Strapping a couple hundred thousand pounds of propellent and oxidizer to one's backside and lighting it off constitutes substantial risk in my mind.

#10 wartimecollectables.com

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 10:49 AM

...I wonder who designed the medal, looks like something from Buck Rogers or Flash Gordon?


:lol: I'll have to reread my info and find out. I've only seen one "in person" and yep, it's kinda gaudy! Designed perchance by the same guy that did the USAF DSM?

#11 Darrell

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 11:00 AM

It's a NASA medal awarded to civilians and military in NASA programs, and while it doesn't get the press coverage the military Medals of Honor get, it seems to be given for equal risks. Strapping a couple hundred thousand pounds of propellent and oxidizer to one's backside and lighting it off constitutes substantial risk in my mind.


Plus the fact that a small fraction of these were awarded compared to the Military MOH. However, like other's, if it comes down the house and wife or this one ... I guess I'll stick to the warm bed and good meals http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/think.gif

#12 collectsmedals

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 05:07 PM

The Congressional Space Medal of Honor was designed by the U.S. Army's Institute of Heraldry. It was chosen from five designs submitted in 1963.

As a piece of trivia, it is the only officially awarded U.S. Medal to have a gemstone on it. (The center is a 0.25 carat diamond)

There have been only 13 of these prestigious awards presented.

They are to:

Neil Armstrong
Frank Borman
Charles Conrad
John Glenn
Alan Shepard
Virgil Grissom (posthumous)
John Young
Thomas P. Stafford
James Lovell
Shannon Lucid
Roger Chaffee (posthumous)
Edward White (posthumous)
William M. Shepherd

#13 collectsmedals

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 05:09 PM

The Congressional Space Medal of Honor was designed by the U.S. Army's Institute of Heraldry. It was chosen from five designs submitted in 1963.

As a piece of trivia, it is the only officially awarded U.S. Medal to have a gemstone on it. (The center is a 0.25 carat diamond)

There have been only 13 of these prestigious awards presented.

They are to:

Neil Armstrong
Frank Borman
Charles Conrad
John Glenn
Alan Shepard
Virgil Grissom (posthumous)
John Young
Thomas P. Stafford
James Lovell
Shannon Lucid
Roger Chaffee (posthumous)
Edward White (posthumous)
William M. Shepherd



#14 collectsmedals

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 05:10 PM

I just noticed that the original post has a more extensive list of recipients.

I guess my reference is out of date. Sorry.

#15 IMPERIAL QUEST

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 08:15 AM

You would think that the "designer" could have come up with something a little more tasteful for our space heroes. It looks like a cheap piece of costume jewelry that was created for an intentional laugh. As someone else mentioned - it reminds me of the gum ball machine-looking AF DSM http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbdown.gif http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

#16 Mark M

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 03:23 PM

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#17 johnnyrocket

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 12:33 PM

Maybe I'm mistaken—but have I seen these for sale on the internet?



#18 917601

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:33 PM

It's a NASA medal awarded to civilians and military in NASA programs, and while it doesn't get the press coverage the military Medals of Honor get, it seems to be given for equal risks. Strapping a couple hundred thousand pounds of propellent and oxidizer to one's backside and lighting it off constitutes substantial risk in my mind.


Quite a difference between civilian NASA service and military service. I know many in my circle who would volunteer without thought for space missions of any kind as opposed to signing up for military wartime service. In my belief system, civilian service is just that, civilian service. However, " volunteers" for military service a step above ( I served voluntarily) but all my praise goes to draftees. Huge differences between civilian service, voluntary service, drafted service. That said, a relative of mine who recently retired had received 6 or 7 NASA medals of Achievement during his 20 some year NASA career....civilian awards just do not have much meaning or collectibility to me.


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