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Removing creases from paper posters


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#1 Mr.Maim

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 04:59 PM

Greetings fellow preservationists!

 

I recently acquired a poster-sized parts identification drawing of a Browning Model 1918 Machinegun (still perplexed by the model because it is largely a 1917 watercooled) that has been stored folded for most of its life. I would like to get the creases out and have it framed behind low UV glass and hung in my library.

 

Is there a way to get creases out of paper?

 

I think that the material is actually drafting paper referred to as vellum.

 

 

I'll post pictures shortly. Need to lay it out and photograph it.



#2 Brig

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:08 PM

Folds are pretty much there for good...you could lay it out flat and place heavy items such as books along the crease if they're not too brittle and flatten it the best you can. Best to put the exterior of the crease facing up and place the books atop that...but again it'll only do so much



#3 crashdive

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:12 PM

IMHO, leave it alone and frame it as is. I have some framed copies of Stars and Stripes form V-E Day and you can hardly see the creases.

#4 P-59A

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:37 PM

Velum is animal skin, not paper. Have it conserved and framed by an expert.


Edited by P-59A, 24 January 2019 - 05:38 PM.


#5 Der Finn

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:44 PM

From Wikipedia - "Modern "paper vellum" is a made of synthetic plant material, and is called such for its usage and quality similarities. Paper vellum is used for a variety of purposes including tracing, technical drawings, plans."  I doubt this poster was made from animal skin.



#6 Bruce Linz

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:53 PM

I would find the very best framer in your area and see what they can do for you.

#7 Blacksmith

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 06:28 PM

Also consider a trip to the local historical society / museum, and see if they have a paper preservationist with recommendations.

#8 Mr.Maim

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 07:56 PM

I guess I can't edit my own posts. I was going to put the pictures above in my first post.
 
No animals were harmed in the making of this drawing. :) It is done on drafting paper vellum.
 
Let me re-word my question: does anyone have experience in removing creases from documents, posters, pictures, or drawings?
 
cO1ceIm.jpg

0SAylLl.jpg

Edited by Mr.Maim, 24 January 2019 - 08:01 PM.


#9 P-59A

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 10:42 PM

From Wikipedia - "Modern "paper vellum" is a made of synthetic plant material, and is called such for its usage and quality similarities. Paper vellum is used for a variety of purposes including tracing, technical drawings, plans."  I doubt this poster was made from animal skin.

Ahhh, modern paper. The vellum I have is in the form of Presidential land grants from Monroe and Jackson and those are animal skin, not fake vellum.



#10 Bluehawk

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 06:07 AM

You can usually relax folded paper simply by placing it on a rack (like the one my wife uses in the kitchen to cool hot baked goods on), in the presence of humidity (aka gentle steam) inside an enclosed container (such as a plastic storage tub of the correct size). Don't spray water directly on the paper. All you want to do is introduce some moisture back to the paper fibers over a period of time.

I usually used a baking pan of hot water in the bottom of the container, with the rack on top of that, and the lid on.

 

Just leave it in there awhile (a few hours or a day or so) and then bring it out and put it under a piece of glass or plexi (one that fits side to side top to bottom of the paper) with some weight on top. Repeat as or if needed.

 

In most cases (I've even done this with rolled up yard-longs!) that process will take care of the average problem as well as can be done without spending possibly in the hundred$ to have a conservator do pretty much the exact same thing.


Edited by Bluehawk, 25 January 2019 - 06:09 AM.


#11 72psb

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 06:52 AM

I would take it to a blueprint maker and have it copied.They have the large machines to make the copies. Then I would display the copies and put the original away to prevent any future damage.A good clean copy would display as well as the original with only a hint of the creases.

Good luck.



#12 Captainofthe7th

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 09:46 AM

You can usually relax folded paper simply by placing it on a rack (like the one my wife uses in the kitchen to cool hot baked goods on), in the presence of humidity (aka gentle steam) inside an enclosed container (such as a plastic storage tub of the correct size). Don't spray water directly on the paper. All you want to do is introduce some moisture back to the paper fibers over a period of time.

I usually used a baking pan of hot water in the bottom of the container, with the rack on top of that, and the lid on.

 

Just leave it in there awhile (a few hours or a day or so) and then bring it out and put it under a piece of glass or plexi (one that fits side to side top to bottom of the paper) with some weight on top. Repeat as or if needed.

 

In most cases (I've even done this with rolled up yard-longs!) that process will take care of the average problem as well as can be done without spending possibly in the hundred$ to have a conservator do pretty much the exact same thing.

 

Bluehawk's method is probably best.  I have done a similar process with an iron on low and using the steam function, keeping the document protected with another cloth or paper item.  It's enough to introduce some humidity to and allow the fibers to be pliable again.  I then put it on a flat surface with a flat item on top and stack weight (books, etc) on that.  I've done this mainly with photographs.  This unrolls and unwrinkles and can disguise creases.

 

Rob




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