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Frames, good quality ones that are not expensive


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#1 LIFER

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 10:43 PM

Looking for ones that are archival, that will be a plus. Maybe finding ones for less when you get them in bulk. Mostly posters and maps 30x40"  and then smaller. Looked on internet and those that I found were too expensive (for quantity) or not offering larger sizes. Plastic frames are good, if it's made well.



#2 Mr.Jerry

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 05:02 AM

Bigger sizes are always tougher to find.  We have a Michael's craft store by us that are usually somewhat expensive, but then occasionally have 50% off sales on frames and such, and they carry a few larger sizes. Doubt their stuff is archival, as that usually means UV glass as well.  But for me, getting the poster into something is better than just having me wreck it.



#3 Brig

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:15 AM

You're not going to find inexpensive archival frames, especially larger sizes. If you're lucky, you'll stumble upon a site having a sale, and even then you're going to pay. I wait for sales and pick them up. If something is worth archival glass, then it's worth spending the money. You get what you pay for when it comes to conservation. I would expect to pay over $100 for a frame the size you seek, even on sale.

 

As Mr. Jerry stated, Michael's tends to have a 50% off sale on frames/shadow boxes once a month, and if you get on their mailing list they seem to send a 50% off 1 item coupon out monthly. But Michael's does not carry archival frames. They do, however, sell acid-free matte board.



#4 plick27

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:15 AM

3rd for Michael's. They also carry a decent selection of shadow boxes and displays that are also reasonable when they are on sale.


Edited by plick27, 24 November 2018 - 06:16 AM.


#5 tdogchristy90

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:35 AM

I will also 4th Michaels. The issue isn't finding something cheap, it's archival, and archival will always cost you more.

Michaels isn't cheap but the lady at our store has always done right by me and I'd prefer to pay a little more if I can work with someone who's appreciative. Here are a couple options.

Michaels has a standard package deal that includes frame, uv glass, 2 mats. It's a basic package deal that can be better than just picking stuff off their display wall.

You can also take a store bought frame and have them put in acid free mats and uv glass.

I'd at least go into Michaels and pick their brain. At least get an idea of what's going on with frames, mats, glass, fitting, ect.

Hope this helps.

#6 Brig

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:47 AM

Michael's sells large acid-free matte sheets (something like 40x30) for around 8 bucks. With a pencil and hobby knife, you can covert it into a matte for a fraction of the cost of buying pre-cut. Pre-cut mattes tend to run 3-4 bucks for just a 4x6, so definitely worth the time to cut them yourselves and save the moola. I do it all the time



#7 LIFER

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:07 PM

Hi Brig

I figured as much. First, I was just looking for frames with backing and a plastic sheet that was ready made. But when I put the post up I was thinking (or hoping) that there would be such thing. After all any extra money always goes for the collection, right?



#8 LIFER

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:11 PM

Brig, Plick 27 and Tdogchristy

I will have to check out a Michaels, and find out when that sale is.



#9 LIFER

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:12 PM

Brig

I agree. Thanks for the tip.



#10 dunit35

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 11:42 AM

I usually take my newspaper articles to Hobby Lobby. It ranges from $40-$60 to get one framed. They are currently framing a VE Day newspaper at $50 and a larger D Day newspaper for $80. I have three of the Valor Studio prints that they framed for me. Those were around $150 a piece to frame. 


Edited by dunit35, 05 December 2018 - 11:42 AM.


#11 Bluehawk

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 09:07 AM

A sideways suggestion I have used over many many years... maybe it will be helpful at certain times.

Although it is surely true that frames can be bought from retailers, what I often do is to forage in second hand shops, Goodwill, Purple Heart, DAV etc etc etc. for old frames el cheapo (empty or not) >  then cut them down with a mitre saw and reunite the corners to fit something.

I've gotten some truly fine vintage frames that way, like nothing manufactured today.



#12 LIFER

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 01:08 AM

Hobby Lobby and second hand places are good ideas too.



#13 Okie96

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 01:13 PM

So is the focus on matting, glass, and backing only, or is there also certain frame materials or finishes that you want to use? Certain finishes to avoid for acidity or other reasons?



#14 LIFER

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 06:46 PM

No, just to protect them. Are you asking because you know of a good deal, a supplier or have a business.

#15 Okie96

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 08:50 PM

No, I thought that with contact or being next to some finishes on frame material may also  be dangerous in addition to the material on either side of what's in the frame.



#16 Blacksmith

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 09:14 PM

If it is framed properly, the document should not touch the frame. It should be on an acid-free backing, and either matted with equal-quality stock, or spacers inserted to keep the piece from touching the glass. Subtle changes in heat and humidity - especially depending on the framed object - can cause it to stick to the glass over time. As such, you want space between the glass and whatever is framed.



No, I thought that with contact or being next to some finishes on frame material may also  be dangerous in addition to the material on either side of what's in the frame.



#17 LIFER

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 12:02 AM

Good to know.

#18 Bluehawk

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 07:17 AM



Good to know.

A nice diagram of what Blacksmith wrote:

 

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#19 Bugme

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 07:39 AM

Not to beat the dead horse too much but, reiterating what others said: Anything archival will not be cheap but, it does not have to be expensive either. I use Hobby Lobby and Micheals since both are nearby. I watch for frame sales, the 50% off type which have been mentioned and then, for posters, I get from Hobby Lobby or Michael's a piece of low UV glass cut to fit the frame. Not cheap but, cheaper than having it professionally done by them.

Let me add the caveat, when it comes to very nice items, I use Hobby Lobby's framing service to do the whole thing. Their work is awesome and usually more than 50% less than what the local frame shops charge.

#20 Blacksmith

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 09:42 AM

100% correct.

You really just have to inquire, based on what you are trying to do.

Two recent real examples from last week:

1) I had an existing framed piece that needed a new piece of glass in it. It had fallen before we got it, and the corner was cracked off the glass. I went to one of the big corporate stores, and they quoted me $60 for a piece of UV glass. I called the local framing store, and got it for $43.

2) Also, I had a print that is approximately two foot by three foot, that I needed framed. Same local framing store wanted $260 to frame it. I took it corporate place, and got it done for $160, after the coupon magic. Same UV glass, same frame, same everything.

I will say, I think there is goodness to supporting local businesses, and I do not mind paying a little more. I just thought that was a little too much disparity. Maybe there are some things lost on me, like material quality, etc; but, based on what I was getting done, I am ok with that.

Not to beat the dead horse too much but, reiterating what others said: Anything archival will not be cheap but, it does not have to be expensive either. I use Hobby Lobby and Micheals since both are nearby. I watch for frame sales, the 50% off type which have been mentioned and then, for posters, I get from Hobby Lobby or Michael's a piece of low UV glass cut to fit the frame. Not cheap but, cheaper than having it professionally done by them.

Let me add the caveat, when it comes to very nice items, I use Hobby Lobby's framing service to do the whole thing. Their work is awesome and usually more than 50% less than what the local frame shops charge.




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