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Antiaircraft Artillery Units in WWI AEF


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#26 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 11:57 AM

This and the following red devil patch have both been identified as representing the 5th AA MG Battalion.

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  • 5th-AA-MG-Battalion.jpg


#27 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 11:59 AM

Sewn onto the service coat belonging to Earl S. Adams, 5th AA MG Battalion.

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  • 5th-AA-MG-Batt-Earl-S-Adams.jpg


#28 Cobrahistorian

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:01 PM

Here's Hagen's uniform.  As you can see the arrow goes from bottom right to upper left.  1st AA MG battalion goes from upper left to bottom right. 

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  • Hagen Uniform 2.JPG


#29 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:02 PM

This insignia along with the following patch have both been identified as either the 5th or 10th AA MG Battalion.

 

If the previous two shoulder patches are in fact 5th AA MG Battalion shoulder patches, then this pair cannot be, unless each battery had its own insignia, which seems unlikely to me.

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  • 10th or 5th AA MG Battalion I.jpg


#30 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:04 PM

The second of the two 5th or 10th AA MG Battalion insignia.

 

Can anybody confirn the ID of this patch?

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  • 10th or 5th AA MG Battalion II.jpg


#31 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:15 PM

Jon thank you for adding the 2nd AA MG Battalion patch photo.

 

Here are examples of the 1st and 3rd AA MG Battalion insignia, along with a sketch of an alternative 2nd AA MG Battalion patch design that may or may not have been made.

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  • 45-1st-Army-AA-MG-I.gif

Edited by world war I nerd, 08 February 2019 - 12:16 PM.


#32 world war I nerd

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:18 PM

Close up of a homeward bound AEF officer wearing the insignia of the 1st AA MG Battalion.

 

Photo courtesy of the Troy Morgan collection

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  • 46 1st Army-1st Anti-Aircraft MG Battalion.jpg


#33 Cobrahistorian

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:31 PM

Interesting, I'd seen it interpreted that the direction of the arrow determined which battalion.  I'd assumed pointing up and to the left was 2nd AAMG and down and to the right was 1st.  I've identified this one as 2nd, since I was able to match Hagen's name on the 2nd AAMG officer roster with his uniform.  



#34 atb

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 03:03 PM

This is another, so-called, anti-aircraft anomaly. I've seen this insignia placed between the legs of the First Army "A" patch, and all by itself as a stand alone patch.
 
It too is reputed to be an anti-aircraft insignia. But for which AA outfit?


That is the post-WW1 Distinctive Unit Insignia for the US Army 2nd Infantry Regiment. It was worn in the lower left sleeve (I think it was the left) of the olive drab service coat. It was replaced at some point by a metal and enameled DUI. It has nothing to do with WW1 AAA units.

#35 world war I nerd

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 04:43 PM

Cobrahistoriah, to date, I've seen the AA MG Patch arrow pointing in three directions: up and to the left - up and to the right - and down and to the right.

 

I think that the arrow, regardless of the battalion, was supposed to be pointing up and to the left. The patches with arrows poingin other directions were likely the result of careless vendors who really didn't understand what the insignia was actually supposed to look like. For now, that's my theory anyways.

 

atb, thanks for providing the ID on the crossed arrow patch. I always wondered about that one. I did see one example of that patch sewn onto the lower left hand sleeve of an Army 1918 pattern service coat..


Edited by world war I nerd, 09 February 2019 - 04:54 PM.


#36 mortaydc60

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 09:17 PM

Your theory makes sense because the pics and ID associated, do not match in the various post submitted.



#37 littlewilly

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 06:02 PM

Here's another head scrather. I've no idea if the shoulder patch worn in this image from Bay State Militaria's website is an AA patch or not, but it's possible.

I think I see a silvered prop Air Service collar disc on this gentleman.  That would make the shoulder patch a form of the winged propeller patch seen now and then.      MHJ



#38 Bill K

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 03:00 PM

Here's another head scrather. I've no idea if the shoulder patch worn in this image from Bay State Militaria's website is an AA patch or not, but it's possible.


I think what you're looking at is a version of this patch, Aircraft Armaments Section. They operated under the Ordnance Corps but worked closely with the Air Service. Bill

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  • aa1.jpg


#39 Bill K

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:43 PM

Here's the patch skewed, angled & superimposed on the photo. I've seen other versions of this patch with larger wings like the version this doughboy is wearing. It also looks like that's an Ordnance disc he's wearing.

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  • Picture1.jpg


#40 world war I nerd

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 01:11 PM

Bill, you nailed it. Your expertise is much appreciated.

 

And thanks for letting us all know of the existence of the "Aircraft Armaments Section" (AAS).

 

I'd never seen, nor heard of that particular AEF insignia. It's always great to see a new discovery.

 

PS, is that a wheel within a Ordnance flaming bomb that's bisected by a wing with the initials "AA" for "Aircraft Armaments"?.

 

If a wheel, would that signify that the AAS delivered a lot of aircraft ordnance?



#41 world war I nerd

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 01:18 PM

Here's another variation of the standing red devil AA insignia that turned up recently on eBay.

 

It sure would be nice to see one of these things on a WW I service coat or in a period photograph.

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  • AA-Red-Devil-Insignia-eBay.jpg

Edited by world war I nerd, 22 March 2019 - 01:20 PM.


#42 world war I nerd

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 01:34 PM

I just remembered that the standing red devil design was around in May of 1919, as an illustration of that design appeared (along with 73 other AEF insignia designs) in a full color spread that was dedicated to AEF insignia. The illustrations appeared in the May 4, 1919 edition of the "New York Tribune" newspaper.

 

However, the red devil design was misidentified in the "Tribune'. It was captioned as being the insignia for the 10th Division, which today, we know it not to be.

 

The "Tribune" article is probably why the standing red devil is frequently misidentified as "10th Division AA"

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  • May-1919-New-York-Tribune.jpg



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