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PARTY LIKE ITS 1899!-INDIANA SPAN-AM FINDS


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#26 BEAST

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:52 AM

Really great finds! I like how you have a photo of Barr wearing the gloves you own, don't see stuff like that to often. What was the average number of soldiers per company during this time? As you mentioned there was only one Lt. per company.


Thanks David D. Although I would like to clear up on point, each company had more than one Lieutenant, however unlike a modern infantry company, there was only 1 First Lieutenant and 1 Second Lieutenant. Today we consider these terms to be just a rank, whereas an infantry company could have 3 or 4 First Lieutenants. At the time of the Spanish-American War, you could only have one First Lieutenant as he was the ranking lieutenant in the company.

During the Span-Am, an Infantry company mobilized from the Indiana National Guard had approximately 100 enlisted men and three officers. The enlisted men consisted of members of the guard companies that were called to Federal duty and recruits. At least with the Indiana Volunteer Infantry, the recruits were men who volunteered from the same area in which the regiment was raised, but joined after the guard companies had been mustered.

#27 Allan H.

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:07 AM

Most collectors tend to apply modern methods to the way things used to be in the military. Many collectors don't realize for example that when militias and National Guard companies were formed, that they were formed by geographical constraints, and that the company leaders were normally elected (though sometimes the leaders received appointments from the governor etc.) to their positions rather than earned promotion through the ranks. President Harry S. Truman had hoped that his fellow volunteers in the field artillery unit would elect him as the comapny first sergeant. They surprised him by electing him as a lieutenant! 

 

It didn't really matter what a person's civilian occupation was- units were mustered to fill needs of the regiment. In many cases, the difference between becoming a field artilleryman, cavlary trooper or infantryman were based solely on where the unit was mustered from. In LT Linvill's case, it didn't matter that he was a surgeon, the company in his town was an infantry unit.

 

Great items and great information here!

Allan



#28 David D

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for clearing it up for me, Beast.

#29 BEAST

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 03:42 AM

Most collectors tend to apply modern methods to the way things used to be in the military. Many collectors don't realize for example that when militias and National Guard companies were formed, that they were formed by geographical constraints, and that the company leaders were normally elected (though sometimes the leaders received appointments from the governor etc.) to their positions rather than earned promotion through the ranks. President Harry S. Truman had hoped that his fellow volunteers in the field artillery unit would elect him as the comapny first sergeant. They surprised him by electing him as a lieutenant! 

 

It didn't really matter what a person's civilian occupation was- units were mustered to fill needs of the regiment. In many cases, the difference between becoming a field artilleryman, cavlary trooper or infantryman were based solely on where the unit was mustered from. In LT Linvill's case, it didn't matter that he was a surgeon, the company in his town was an infantry unit.

 

Great items and great information here!

Allan

 

Allan,  Thanks for the kind words! 



#30 BEAST

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 03:44 AM

Thanks for clearing it up for me, Beast.

My pleasure David D., I'm glad you asked the question as others are sure to have wondered the same thing.



#31 BEAST

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:48 PM

I thought I would post two examples of the 1895 Forage Cap. One is the officer's version and the other the enlisted, and both are marked for the Indiana National Guard.

 

1895 caps.jpg

 

interior caps.jpg



#32 BEAST

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:49 PM

officer cap interior.jpg

 

enlistef button.jpg



#33 BEAST

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:49 PM

OFFICER BUTTON.jpg



#34 BEAST

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:54 PM

enlisted interior web.jpg



#35 BEAST

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 11:12 AM

Here's a new addition to start the year out right: Edward Neil, Company M, 157th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

 

PORTRAIT FRONT.jpg

 

 



#36 Skysoldier80

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 06:37 AM

Here's a new addition to start the year out right: Edward Neil, Company M, 157th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

 

attachicon.gifPORTRAIT FRONT.jpg

 

 

 

Great find.  I know a gentleman in Iowa, who makes great finds like this all of the time.. Lesson, there is still stuff out there.



#37 BEAST

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 12:55 PM

So I found a piece that I didn't even know that I was looking for! Thanks to Robb Kay at the Colonel's Cache, I was able to obtain this Indiana National Guard Artillery officer's fatigue blouse.  It is the 1876 pattern but most likely dates from the 1890s as it does not have any trim and it has three buttons on the cuff. I have seen several of the undress coats worn by Indiana National Guard officers, but i cannot remember ever seeing the fatigue blouse.  

 

BLOUSE 1 copy.jpg

 

IND BUTTON 2.jpg

 

shoulder board 1.jpg

 

MANU TAG.jpg

 

 



#38 BEAST

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Posted 31 December 2019 - 05:26 AM

New Year's Eve 1898
 
A receipt from a Cuban ice house for 600 pounds of ice sold to the Quartermaster of the 161st Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment while at Camp Columbia, Cuba. On New Year's Day, the Regiment would march into Havana, celebrating the end of Spanish rule.
 
From the History of the 161st Indiana Volunteer Infantry: "As the time drew nearer to the noon hour the excitement among the people increased until they were running about the streets crying, shouting, laughing and singing. Dozens of bombs, exploding high in the air, added to the noise and confusion. There was an intense feeling. The hour they had longed prayed for and fought for was almost at hand. They knew that at that same minute, the hated Spanish were leaving the governor-general's palace and that the Spanish guards were being relieved for all time in the Morro. Their fair land. "Queen of the Antilles," was about to be taken from the hand of the oppressor."

 

receipt web.jpg




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