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REDAR hose question


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#1 HUD69

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Posted 01 December 2018 - 11:55 PM

Hi all,

 

Recently I received two oxygen hoses in a US Navy pilot lot.

One clearly mounts to a 3 pin mask hose connector and has attachements for the communication. (1960 dated)

The other is smaller in diameter and reminds me of the hoses found on the A-13 with mask mounted regulators (but not the same)

 

See images for the looks and partnumbers. Hope someone is able to shed a light on the use of these hoses.

 

(third image in next post due to file size)

 

Cheers and thanks,

Ron

 

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  • 20181116_070939.jpg


#2 HUD69

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Posted 01 December 2018 - 11:56 PM

And the third image:

 

Cheers and thanks,

Ron

 

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  • 20181116_070829.jpg


#3 mohawkALSE

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 01:20 AM

Interesting to see the 3 pin bayonet connector  on a Navy piece that early.  Im not too well versed in USN stuff from the 50s or 60s but Ive usually only seen masks have the MC-3A or whatever the USN designation was for it, and then having mini regulators mounted to the end of masks.  Maybe its for a high altitude setup.  I think that narrow fitting hose would attach to the rear left of the lid on a certain type of RSSK (Rigid Seat Survival Kit).  Interesting to see the wiring at the base of it, is there anything wired at the top where that spring loaded toilet seat cover is?  There are so many variations of RE Darling hoses and tubes used in Naval Aviation.  Maybe a solid Navy life support buff could pin point what they are.



#4 mohawkALSE

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 01:28 AM

After browsing a little bit through a NAVAIR manual, that narrow hose might be for a Douglas seat pan setup.  If you open up that spring loaded toilet seat cover, is there like a bell shaped (not sure how else to describe it) tube end and then 2 electrical jacks on the upper left and upper right of that air duct?  I have another manual from the early 80s that has most of the 60s-70s era seat kits that might shed more light.



#5 HUD69

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 11:43 AM

After browsing a little bit through a NAVAIR manual, that narrow hose might be for a Douglas seat pan setup.  If you open up that spring loaded toilet seat cover, is there like a bell shaped (not sure how else to describe it) tube end and then 2 electrical jacks on the upper left and upper right of that air duct?  I have another manual from the early 80s that has most of the 60s-70s era seat kits that might shed more light.

 

Hope that these images clearify it a bit. The green one is (in my opinion) suitable for a three pin connector (tried it and it fits)

The other one is the toilet seat cover one (it says "oxygen" on the lid)

 

Cheers,

Ron

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  • 20181202_203656.jpg


#6 mohawkALSE

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 11:02 PM

Yeah that makes it more clear for the right one. The NAVAIR I was looking in showed it the 180 degrees from how you are, so you might be able to see why I called it bell shaped and then the 4 connectors.  It mentioned that fitting was for Douglas Aircraft survival kit seat pans.  I think the Navy stuff usually has 2 REDAR hoses, 1 for the aircraft O2 supply and the other for the emergency O2 supply usually in the lid or seat pad of a survival kit assembly.  Id say that one is the emergency O2 hose for a seat kit out of a Douglas aircraft.  Again, Ill have to get out my earlier NAVAIR that covers seat kits and hoses from the 60s til the early 80s.

 

The 3 pin hose might be some sort of extension.  Still find it interesting the USN using that fitting in the early 60s.  First I saw of any Navy masks having a 3 pin bayonet is on the current masks using the CRU-103 regulators etc and then on the E-2 Hawkeye's parachute pack/survival kit hose.



#7 mohawkALSE

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 11:11 PM

Oh and looking at the 1 pic you show the PN and 1960 cure date, that has a DAC (Douglas Aircraft Co) part number.



#8 HUD69

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 01:05 AM

Thanks a lot for all your effort! I just keep them in my spares box for later use.

 

Ron



#9 mohawkALSE

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 06:45 PM

No problem.  I find Naval Aviation stuff can be confusing.  Id say stuff from Post WW2 to current can be pretty confusing as they made so many variations of equipment for all the various airframes.  Various oxygen hoses, various comm/ICS cords, same model survival kits but different manufacturer's so there are also differences there etc etc.  Even today the Navy has 5 different type of helmet/O2 mask comm cord plugs and jacks where as the USAF and US Army have 1 standard and 1 other special type of plug.  Now in the Navy O2 hose wise it might be getting a bit better seeing they consolidated to fewer airframes.

 

I do the same thing too, I have a nice size box of various spares. I collect mostly Army Aviation stuff but have some Air Force and Navy bits n pieces.  I have a few various adapter comm cords for the different Navy plugs and then REDAR wise I have a special comm adapter.  It has one of the REDAR quick release fittings like used in F/A-18s but is only a comm cord for use with the Mx/plane captains headsets if they need to do a run up or a taxi under tow with comms.  I own a MQ-1A headset/mic and oxygen mask test set so with all the various branches comm cord adapters I can pretty much use it to test the headset and mic assemblies on any helmet setup.



#10 HUD69

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 12:22 AM

It is rather confusing and older manuals are harder to find then the USAF TO's. 
My main collecting focus is US Navy (1970's till 2005 aprox) Used to collect a lot, but decided to focus 10 years ago.

Noticed the smaller hose is almost identical to the one on the GRU-7 comm/ox block. But also different in the way the comm cord is routed.

 

 

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#11 mohawkALSE

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 12:54 PM

Ive found both branches of pubs kinda hard to find so when I do see them I jump.  Earlier in the year I found that NAVAIR on seat survival kits from the 70s but changed to 1981 so I took a gamble on it to find what I was looking for and JACKPOT!  I was looking for info on the RSSK-9 series seat kits (no emergency oxygen) used in the NAA/Rockwell OV-10 Bronco as I bought one of those kits a few years back.  There is like zero info out there on the internet about that kit other than its Mil-Spec and almost zero pics of it except for a few shown installed in the seat.  Seeing Broncos were retired in 94 all the later NAVAIRs covers seat kits deleted that chapter so this one was perfect on all its info.  Id love to find some AFTOs on ALSE/AFE from the 70s til recent.  The recent stuff will be difficult seeing the AF moved to epubs and pretty much don't publish pubs now.  I have a ton of printed Army pubs as well as their more recent epubs.  I personally like the hard print stuff.

 

I can tell thats a Martin Baker seat in the pic from the "Sticker Clip" on the left side there.  The Army OV-1 Mohawks Mk-J5B and D seats used those to secure their lap belt halves on the survival kit to the seat aside from the locking lugs inside the seat bucket.  Is that metal conduit for the cable going to the green ring to activate the emergency O2?



#12 HUD69

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 09:48 PM

It is indeed a Martin Baker GRU-7A seat for the F-14 Tomcat.

I keep on searching Ebay and other sites for NAVAIR publications, I did find myself a nice F-14B checklist to go with the seat.



#13 mohawkALSE

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 11:23 PM

Jealous you have the whole seat. Which kit is in there, one of the RSSK-7s or one of the SKU kits?  One day I hope to find a seat from the OV-1, ideally both a J5B from the Nam era and a later J5D seat.  I have a couple of the RSSK kits packed for the J5D seat ready to put in.  Wouldn't mind finding a LW-3B seat as well for a OV-10 Bronco since I have that RSSK-9A kit as well from a USMC Bronco.

 

One time on ebay I found one of those rigger made bags for the checklists, Nav Charts etc etc.  Had a zippered main pocket and a velcro side pocket.  The inside had a bunch of charts and stuff and one of those little green plastic "Map Strap" knee boards.  They never showed the outer pocket contents but I could see it had a blue plastic cover.  Bid on it and got it for like 9 bucks.  The inside was all VFA-106  nav and training charts for the F/A-18 course when it was in NAS Cecil Field, FL before moving to NAS Lemore,CA and the mystery item was the F/A-18  NATOPS checklist from 1992.  Was a nice bargain at 9 bucks.



#14 HUD69

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 11:52 PM

Jealous you have the whole seat. Which kit is in there, one of the RSSK-7s or one of the SKU kits?  One day I hope to find a seat from the OV-1,

It has the SKU-2 in it, complete with dinghy, survival parts and radio.

I only have the checklist, still looking for the nav bags. (hard to find)

 

Bronco seats are hard to find, Mohawk every now and then indeed.

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#15 mohawkALSE

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 08:39 PM

Keep looking on ebay for the bags, I see them every couple of months.  I have 2 types, the one I mentioned, and then another one that has 3 slots, 2 zippered on the sides and the middle is just an open sleeve below the carry handle.  That one has the stuff still in it too and fits the nav charts and FLIPs, doesn't seem to be for a CL at all.

 

Does the URT-33 in the SKU have the correct lanyard to attach to "the deck" as the Navy says in the NATOPS manuals?   My RSSK-9A for the Bronco has the URT-33A in the front right of the container.  The beacon was MIA when I got the kit but I ended up buying the correct one with a dead battery and then found the correct activation lanyard with the snap hook.  I also have another actuator with that lanyard gone which is what I keep installed so no one or myself trips on that wire twist lanyard.  I have a LR-1 raft with cover but havent packed it again as the rubber is kind of stiff now.  The equipment bag has everything in it but the MK-13s and a can opener.  Also came with the Navy type PLD.

 

I see the risers have the SEAWARS.  I have a complete pilots parachute assembly with all the records from a Marine OV-10 that has the SEAWARS installed. The records came with X-rays of the fittings with SEAWARS to show they were safe with the batteries removed.  Also have a complete chute assembly from a OV-1D as well and cool thing about it is its from 1 of 5 OV-1s left in storage at DM AFB, AZ.



#16 HUD69

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 03:44 AM

Does the URT-33 in the SKU have the correct lanyard to attach to "the deck" as the Navy says in the NATOPS manuals?   

 

I had two versions of the SKU mounted URT-33's. This one appears has the correct lanyard.

See images, 

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#17 mohawkALSE

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:35 AM

Interesting the left the original white lanyard tied to the ring on the beacons body yet the red plug certainly isnt inserted as the actuator assembly is installed.  That white lanyard is for back chute installation.  The metal lanyard in the 2d pic looks different from what I have and what the Seat Kit NAVAIR shows.  Maybe F-14 specific?  This is the beacon for my Bronco RSSK-9A.  The lanyard used to be a nice uniform coil but has been stretched out at some point.

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  • URT33Ars.jpg


#18 HUD69

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 10:13 PM

Interesting the left the original white lanyard tied to the ring on the beacons body yet the red plug certainly isnt inserted as the actuator assembly is installed.  That white lanyard is for back chute installation.  The metal lanyard in the 2d pic looks different from what I have and what the Seat Kit NAVAIR shows.  Maybe F-14 specific?  This is the beacon for my Bronco RSSK-9A.  The lanyard used to be a nice uniform coil but has been stretched out at some point.

 

I checked my SKU-2 NAVAIR and it has the lanyard also tied to the beacon with rubber bands. The metal cable/lanyard is not described in the SKU NAVAIR.

If mine is original F-14, I can't tell, this is the way I got it, The F-14 NAVAIR has a partnumber for this lanyard, but I dont have a reference between pn and an image of the item.



#19 mohawkALSE

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 11:13 PM

What year is your NAVAIR?  Mine is original dated Nov 77 but changed to April 81.  Mine covers the SKU-2A, and I did look and it does show the same thing with the "retrieval lanyard" and the rubber bands.  I guess they leave it on but the cap part that would be used for back chutes is removed for the auto actuator assembly.  The actuator lanyard is different than mine for the SKU, yours is correct. Had the spring clip attached to the cotter pin in the actuator and then the swagged loop end on the "Deck Bracket".   In chapter 13 for the RSSK-9, it shows my URT prep as removing that retrieval lanyard and then shows my style actuator lanyard.   Both our setups are correct for their own applications so that clears that up.  Always good to have the NAVAIR.



#20 HUD69

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 01:26 AM

What year is your NAVAIR?  Mine is original dated Nov 77 but changed to April 81.  Mine covers the SKU-2A, and I did look and it does show the same thing with the "retrieval lanyard" and the rubber bands.  I guess they leave it on but the cap part that would be used for back chutes is removed for the auto actuator assembly.  The actuator lanyard is different than mine for the SKU, yours is correct. Had the spring clip attached to the cotter pin in the actuator and then the swagged loop end on the "Deck Bracket".   In chapter 13 for the RSSK-9, it shows my URT prep as removing that retrieval lanyard and then shows my style actuator lanyard.   Both our setups are correct for their own applications so that clears that up.  Always good to have the NAVAIR.

 

Thank you again for your research and information. I have the digital NAVAIR dated around 2000.

I also have another identical URT-33 but without lanyards, that one is in my other SKU-2A seat container.

 

Can you share the text or image from your TO about the lanyard removing/replacement?

 

Thanks, Ron



#21 mohawkALSE

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Posted 09 December 2018 - 02:57 PM

Ron,  PM me your email.  Ill scan the page or 2 that covers it so it will be full size and not smaller to post on here.   Did you ever notice if the plastic red plug is still attached to that white lanyard underneath those rubber bands and the velcro straps?   Not sure if you ever saw a regular URT-33 or a 33C/M etc as found in USAF back chute such as a BA-22.  When they are left as is, that lanyard is tied to that small loop on the body of the URT and then there is another portion with a little red plug that goes in the actuator slot.  For the Naval use, and what is covered in the preparation for installation in a seat kit, that plug is removed and then a special tool is used in that slot to remove a sleeve I believe.  Then that seat kit actuator tube assembly with the cotter pin and metal cable is installed.  You will see exactly what Im talking about when I send you the NAVAIR section.  The SKU-2A section covers that, but doesnt show removing the lanyard like the RSSK-9 section does.  Not sure what other kits might leave it or remove them as well.




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