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How to clean synthetic rubber?


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#1 Bodes

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 11:41 AM

Forum members, I purchased a WW2 era synthetic rubber raincoat today.....In nice complete condition with only a glob of white paint on the front, around the size of a 50 cent piece.....Is there any safe way to try and remove the paint?....Any thoughts appreciated, Bodes



#2 themick

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 11:50 AM

Hi Bodes,

I'll throw this out there.  If the rubber is still flexible, you can try wrinkling it in the area of the paint stain, and if you are lucky, the paint will flake off.

Good luck!!

 

Steve



#3 Bodes

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 11:53 AM

Hi Bodes,

I'll throw this out there.  If the rubber is still flexible, you can try wrinkling it in the area of the paint stain, and if you are lucky, the paint will flake off.

Good luck!!

 

Steve

 

Steve, Thanks for the great suggestion....Bodes
 



#4 Bodes

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 03:25 PM

Unfortunately, it appears to be set in the rubber..Any other thoughts on something that might loosen the paint without doing harm to the rubber material?.....Bodes

#5 Allan H.

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Posted 01 October 2018 - 06:16 AM

When I worked in the tire industry, we used kerosene to clean butyl rubber. Kerosene used to be used as a method of dry cleaning. You could also buy a small can of lighter fluid and try it. Put a couple of dots on the inside rubber where it won't show to ensure you don't have any reactions, but it shouldn't harm the material or alter the color.

 

Allan 



#6 Bodes

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Posted 01 October 2018 - 07:29 AM

When I worked in the tire industry, we used kerosene to clean butyl rubber. Kerosene used to be used as a method of dry cleaning. You could also buy a small can of lighter fluid and try it. Put a couple of dots on the inside rubber where it won't show to ensure you don't have any reactions, but it shouldn't harm the material or alter the color.
 
Allan 


Thanks Allen, I had thought about gasoline, but was concerned that might be a bit harsh...Will see about obtaining some kerosene or lighter fluid.....Bodes


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