Jump to content


Photo

Calling Cards?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Retired Army Noncom

Retired Army Noncom
  • Members
    • Member ID: 169,486
  • 427 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:22 AM

I've known it was protocol for newly assigned officers to present their "calling card" to the commander and other officers, it's not only protocol but tradition but my question regards enlisted. 

 

I've see many calling cards for years back, mostly pre-WWI, of enlisted members and I have one from around 1901/1902 from the trumpeter of K Troop 13th Cav Regt Ft Meade SD. Why would a trumpeter have a calling card? Some sort of protocol for enlisted also? Was it required by regulation or just an individual action?

 

Just wondering


Edited by Retired Army Noncom, 28 December 2017 - 11:22 AM.


#2 Mr.Jerry

Mr.Jerry

    Moderator

  • Moderators
    • Member ID: 119
  • 3,083 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wisconsin

Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:40 AM

It might not be just for military purposes, back then (and in the more proper Victorian times just prior) it was social protocol to present a calling card when calling on a lady. 



#3 Retired Army Noncom

Retired Army Noncom
  • Members
    • Member ID: 169,486
  • 427 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:54 AM

It might not be just for military purposes, back then (and in the more proper Victorian times just prior) it was social protocol to present a calling card when calling on a lady. 

That very well could be, didn't think about that but still not like having a whole bunch of ladies to court and chat up in SD at the turn of the century.

 

I've seen these cards for Pvt's quite a bit and mostly are infantry too. These fellows had to have a few extra dollars to use up on calling cards. Last thing I had was extra money when I was a young private.


Edited by Retired Army Noncom, 28 December 2017 - 11:55 AM.


#4 doyler

doyler
  • Members
    • Member ID: 342
  • 33,880 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Under The Bridge

Posted 28 December 2017 - 01:16 PM

I have a calling card from a WW2 paratrooper.Maybe he just liked to be more formal or as stated give a card to the ladies?

 

:) 



#5 Retired Army Noncom

Retired Army Noncom
  • Members
    • Member ID: 169,486
  • 427 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 28 December 2017 - 03:25 PM

Here's some History info and I would think some information would also apply to a member of the military, officer and enlisted.

 

https://www.artofman...e-calling-card/

 

US Army Regulation 600-25 in regards to "visiting cards" only speak of 'officers'.

 

 

"4–2. Visiting cards Visiting cards are used during calls as an individual optional courtesy. Visiting cards will include the individual’s name, grade, and the words “United States Army.” The visiting cards of chaplains will not designate grade. Indication of branch is optional and component will not be shown. The size and type of the care may be determined by the officer; however, the traditional size is 3 1/4 by 1 1/2 inches, with shaded Roman engraving. Standard business sized cards may be used if desired. There should be no directives or requirements for individuals to purchase visiting cards".

 

I have no idea how many times that regulation was superseded by another.

 

My conclusion is protocol for numerous possible scenarios that could come up where manners and courtesy would be recommended back during the Victorian era. It probably died off for enlisted sometime before WWI....but that's just my guess.  



#6 Retired Army Noncom

Retired Army Noncom
  • Members
    • Member ID: 169,486
  • 427 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 28 December 2017 - 03:33 PM

I don't collect these cards but I found this one to be something I wanted since it was K troop 13th Cavalry that was the nucleus for the formation of the 13th Cavalry Regt (13th Horse) at Ft Meade SD in 1901 and those of us that collect that time period including the Punitive Expedition against Villa know it all started with the 13th Cavalry Regt in Columbus NM. This trooper could have been considered the first trumpeter in the 13th Horse..............

 

s-l160000000.jpg

 

 



#7 Allan H.

Allan H.
  • Members
    • Member ID: 151
  • 5,792 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Topeka, Kansas

Posted 30 December 2017 - 06:45 AM

When I was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army in 1987, a friend of mine who worked for a printing company gave me around 200 calling cards. I know for a fact that I was the only LT in my OBC class that had them and when going to formal functions like visiting the various commanders for New Year's Day, I would leave one in the brass tray in the foyer of the various billets that we visited. It was not unusual for my card to be the only card in the tray. These days, I doubt that commanders even have brass trays for these cards as I am sure nobody carries caling cards anymore. Everyone has business cards, but those aren't the same.

 

Allan



#8 firefighter

firefighter
  • Members
    • Member ID: 105,435
  • 12,994 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:East TN

Posted 30 December 2017 - 04:25 PM

I don't collect these cards but I found this one to be something I wanted since it was K troop 13th Cavalry that was the nucleus for the formation of the 13th Cavalry Regt (13th Horse) at Ft Meade SD in 1901 and those of us that collect that time period including the Punitive Expedition against Villa know it all started with the 13th Cavalry Regt in Columbus NM. This trooper could have been considered the first trumpeter in the 13th Horse..............
 
attachicon.gifs-l160000000.jpg


That is COOL. The Army officers guide, at least the older ones, talked about calling cards and showed different styles. I have never seen or heard of one for an enlisted person, unless he/she was a senior enlisted ie: 1stSgt


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users