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WWI USMC Captain's Bars


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#1 C. Roelens

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:50 AM

They are a matching pair of non-magnetic yellow (gold) metal, with no markings. I was told they were original WWI USMC insignia, and they looked silver in the pictures when purchased. Any assistance in identifying exactly what these are would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thank you,

 

Chuck

 

 

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#2 C. Roelens

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:51 AM

backside...

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#3 C. Roelens

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:52 AM

pin and catch...

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#4 C. Roelens

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:53 AM

last pic, pin and catch...

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#5 Justin B.

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 10:43 AM

Gold bars like that are usually police insignia, but I'm not familiar with that type in particular. Tough without any marks.

#6 usmcaviator

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 10:23 AM

I think they just tarnish out some Chuck.  I have found these (the small faux embroidered variety) in WW1 USMC officer trunk lots dating from 1914-1920 and have seen them in wear on the collars of the wool two pocket shirt and overseas caps.  I am pretty sure Army used them as well, so hard to tell what would be Marine and what would be Army, essentially identical.

 

Mike



#7 roadrunner

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 12:24 PM

Hello

Here is the information from the 1917 USMC uniform regulation.
The bars should be silver and 3/8 of an inch apart.

Michael

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#8 MastersMate

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:04 PM

A possibility..

 

In the 1913 USN uniform regulations, the shoulder of the white choker uniform was changed  from being fitted for shoulder marks to shoulder straps and pin on insignia. Article 130 notes they could be silvered white metal or gold plated copper..

 

The Revenue Cutter Service 1st Lieutenant wore the gold bars. The RCS has a gap between maybe 1913 and 1917/18 where nothing is available concerning commissioned officer uniforms.  Col.Williams' 1918 book on ranks and insignia described the new USCG officers uniform as similar in design to the USN.

 

 

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#9 roadrunner

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 09:09 PM

Is the space between the bars a indicator "3/8 of an inch apart" ?

.

Edited by roadrunner, 08 May 2017 - 09:09 PM.


#10 KurtA

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:48 AM

Those style locking catches just don't seem 100 years old to me.  I vote Police.



#11 C. Roelens

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 01:15 PM

Thanks for your time and comments gents... much appreciated.

 

Chuck




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