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Ladder Badge


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#1 Blair217

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 04:20 AM

Anybody have any information on the origin of this badge or have others like it-

 

Scan 43.jpeg



#2 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 05:51 AM

Have pic of rear? Is there a makers mark?

#3 Blair217

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:18 AM

IMG_0764.JPG IMG_0767.JPG



#4 Patchcollector

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 01:53 PM

That's pretty cool.A reunion or commemorative piece perhaps?



#5 Patchcollector

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 02:01 PM

I just did a web search for "Schwaab" out of Milwaukee and found this:

 

http://www.schwaab.c...ustom.aspx?id=5

 

They are still in business!

 

Here is a portion of their webpage info that pertains to your badge, I believe:

 

Product History

While rubber stamps were among the first products produced by Andrew Schwaab’s company, the variety of products crafted over the years is astounding. A major portion of Schwaab’s early business was in the metal engraving area where highly skilled engravers fashioned unique badges of all kinds. One early catalogue of souvenir badges advertised all sorts of novelties such as watch fobs, watch charms, pocket pieces, ash trays, key rings, dies, stamps, stencils, police and fire department badges, metal signs, and more!

Coins for the 1904 World Fair in St. Louis were made at Schwaab as were countless other tokens commemorating any imaginable event, from the Third Annual Cowboys Convention in Haskell, Texas, in 1898, to the Presidential inauguration of S. Grover Cleveland in 1893, to the commemoration of the first sheet of steel rolled in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

Many of the major products made in the 1880s that are still sold today include stamp racks and holders, inks, ink pads, dating and numbering stamps, notary and corporate seals, dies, tags, and badges. Schwaab stopped regular production of badges, tokens and medals in the 1950s Some of these pieces live on in museums, vaults and private collections as a tribute to their fine craftsmanship, dedication and skill. During World War II, Schwaab made stencils for the U.S. Army and Navy. Later it made signature stamps for athletes, including boxer Muhammad Ali, and entertainers such as Liberace, born in West Allis.


Edited by Patchcollector, 02 August 2014 - 02:04 PM.


#6 MAW

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 05:33 PM

The red "figure 8" symbol on the bottom is a Span-Am Corps badge...

 

 

Nice veteran's medal.



#7 mars&thunder

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:46 AM

I've seen three or four of these over the last ten years, various Spanish American War corps symbols on the bottom, usually with peeling paint. Clearly a souvenir badge that the soldier could purchase privately. There's one on ebay now (has been there for a very long time) of a signal corps veteran.



#8 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 11:01 AM

I've seen three or four of these over the last ten years, various Spanish American War corps symbols on the bottom, usually with peeling paint. Clearly a souvenir badge that the soldier could purchase privately. There's one on ebay now (has been there for a very long time) of a signal corps veteran.


Thinking the same, commemorative in nature?

#9 Blair217

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 11:27 AM

I've seen three or four of these over the last ten years, various Spanish American War corps symbols on the bottom, usually with peeling paint. Clearly a souvenir badge that the soldier could purchase privately. There's one on ebay now (has been there for a very long time) of a signal corps veteran.

 

Based on what I paid for this piece from a dealer that one on e-bay is grossly overpriced.I assumed it was a veterans type private purchase piece.

 

Thanks to all for the information.



#10 COOKIEMAN

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 03:42 PM

I have three similar badges (pictures of two attached) of the same design, representing service with Companies B and G, 20th Kansas Regiment Volunteer Infantry, which saw service in the Philippines.  I also believe these badges were private purchase and carry the same status as the nickel metal ladder badges of the Civil War.

Attached Images

  • Co B - USV.jpg
  • Co G - LADDER.jpg
  • Co G - Cap Badge.jpg


#11 COOKIEMAN

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 03:48 PM

As and added note, the Civil War style nickel metal badges were also available for purchase as depicted in the attached photo.  The proud owner of this badge was a member of the 21st Kansas Regiment, which did not see overseas service.

Attached Images

  • 21st KANS - Co M - Moody TRIO.jpg


#12 EricJK

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 05:55 PM

40146549825_ea651503f7_k.jpg




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