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Kiska Force Oilskin version


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Here is a patch I picked up as part of a large group. Pretty sure seller had no idea what it was. I have only held a fully embroidered one before. The material is a very thin oilskin type. Like a fabric coated with something. My local dealer (not where I got this) told me the original patches worn on the mission were like this and not embroidered. Do any members have one to compare it to? Does this one look authentic?

 

When I do the math I think it only cost me $3.50 but would love to know if it's the real deal.

 

Chris

post-17690-1295754221.jpg

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Looks right as rain.ou did well.

 

This is the classic ATF 9/Kiska Task Force also known as Corletts Long Knives.I have a couple different versions and all of mine are from First Special Service Force members.I also have a couple embroidered type and have seen these worn as right shoulder patches after the fact..The printed ones are the only ones I know that are correct for the use of the task force at the time.Being told these were more or less a temporary invasion expediant patch they were made up quickly and not intended to last.This was realted to me by veterans so take it for what its worth,information passed on second hand.

 

RD

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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Heres a variation and I have not seen another.This one still has the paper backing.The vet wrote ATF9 on the back and the date.

 

post-342-1295756975.jpg

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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A few from a display I set up at a military show

 

post-342-1295758042.jpg

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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I'm not sure personally, but I know that there is a photo in the Trading Post a while ago showing a guy wearing the embroidered version. Maybe vets were wearing Patch King versions at the end of the war. Just speculation.

 

-Ski

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

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I replied to the post on this patch in the recent finds section, but I feel that this is a better place to respond. I am not an expert by any means, but I think that both varieties were worn. I personally only have the embroidered variety, including one on the right sleeve of an Alaska Defense Command uniform. I suppose it is possible that it was purchased later, but I doubt it. I saw an "oil skin version", or a silkscreened version or what ever you want to call it in the Alaska Museum in Anchorage. I believe it belonged to an 11th Air Force vet if I remember correctly. Here are some links to the University Of Alaska's photo archives showing the patches being worn on Kiska. Including images that appear to show wear on both sleeves.

In this first pic, notice the jacket hanging on the chair in the background. it appears to have a patch on each arm, but it is hard to tell

 

http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.p...REC=15#metainfo

 

http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.p...0265&REC=16

 

this picture shows the patch on a rain jacket.

http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.p...0277&REC=26

 

I hope this is helpful

Levi

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Pretty common to see patches worn on both shouders during the operation.Lot of pics of the Force wearing them on the 41 jackets.Some with the USA-Canada patch above.I have 5 examples from vets and they were all the printed versions worn or given for the invasion of the Islands.These were from Force vets so I cant say what a AAF unit or others may have done.The embroidered ones I see mainly on dress uniforms after the fact worn as a combat patch.Im one who is a firm believer in never say never so Im just going by what I have encountered.A good friend has a M41 artic jacket with dual printed patches.

 

Fringe,thanks for the links.Great pictures. :thumbsup:

RON

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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here are a few more

 

http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.p...0283&REC=16

 

I stand corrected. the Embroidered patch that I have on a uniform has a communications zone Europe patch on the left sleeve. It is highly probable that it was added later. here is a picture

post-2011-1295931008.jpg

I was looking for a picture of the one on display in Anchorage, but i don't have it on my laptop. I am currently in the Seattle airport. I will try to find it when i get home in the next few days

Levi

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I agree with Ron. From what we've been told by FSSF vets, the oilskin ones were actually worn on the operation and the embroidered ones were worn after the fact, usually as a combat patch. There is photographic evidence of both the FSSF spearhead and the ATF9 patch being worn on the same left sleeve.

 

Jon

In memory of 1LT Julius C. Goldman, XO of F/330th, 83rd Infantry Division 1944-45.

Looking for ETO/MTO P-47 and Tactical Reconnaissance Unit photographs and any items associated with WWII Jewish fighter pilots.

Curator of Arms & Armor at the National Museum of the Marine Corps

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Here is a frame of my Grandfathers stuff. He was in the Kiska Task Force and was issued the oil skin version. The sad part is when I was very young and he gave me all this stuff, there was probably 20 or more of the printed patches, and being young and dumb, I got rid of all but maybe two of them.

 

kiska.JPG

www.vintageproductions.com


"A militaria show is a social event for anti-socials" - A.T. 2008


ASMIC Executive President

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...

My Dad was a rifle platoon leader in the 17th Infantry Regiment during Operation COTTAGE and kept a number of mementos from his WWII service. Among them are an "oilskin" ATF9 patch and a copy of General Corlett's general orders for the operation. The orders state that all personnel were to wear the "long knives" patch on both left and right shoulders of their jackets and on their shirts. Corlett was a detail fanatic during planning, a reputation he had since at least World War I. He had some concern about accidental fratricide, which I believe was one of the reasons for ordering the patch to be worn on both shoulders. The general orders also warn about being "trigger happy" and suggests several passwords that could not be pronounced by Japanese personnel, e.g, "lollipop" and "long limb." Alas, Operation COTTAGE is best known as an example of fratricide; on Kiska, the "fog of war" was literal as well as figurative, and the great anxiety among those units who had no prior combat experience (the 17th Infantry was the exception, having endured the frigid bloodshed on Attu) may have contributed to the needless deaths in the 87th Infantry Regiment.

Illegitimi Non Carborundum

 

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Here is mine. I am not sure it is original, though. Any thoughts?

 

-Ski

post-3043-0-96624700-1361229246.jpeg

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif


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The reverse.....

post-3043-0-33202700-1361229272.jpeg

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif


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Here is mine. I am not sure it is original, though. Any thoughts?

 

-Ski

 

I'm no expert,but man that thing is stone mint,I've never seen one that nice

High Flight

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth

And danced the skies on laughter-silver wings;

Sunward I've climbed and joined the tumbling mirth

Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things

You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung

High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there

I've chased the shouting wind along and flung

My eager craft through footless halls of air.

Up, up the long delirious, burning blue

I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace,

where never lark, or even eagle flew;

and while, with silent, lifting mind I've trod

The high untrespassed sanctity of space,

Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

 

John Gillespie Magee, Jr.

June 9, 1922 – December 11, 1941

 

 

 

" And each man stands with his face in the light of his own drawn sword. Ready to do what a hero can." - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

 

Don't let the B@stards wear you down -"Vinegar" Joe Stillwell

 

 

Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world.Unreasonable

people attempt to adapt the world to themselves.All progress,

therefore, depends on unreasonable people.

George Bernard Shaw

 

 

" Don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining" , Fletcher,from the movie "The outlaw Josey Wales"

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  • 2 months later...

Here is one I found in my Grandfather's stuff last weekend. He was in th 87th Mountain Infantry Regt during the Kiska operation, and later in the 10th Mountain Division in Italy. I also have several photos he took on Kiska that include these patches in the image. I've scanned a bunch of them but I still have more to do. I was able to get and transcribe his wartime letters as well.

post-108788-0-82757400-1367993229.jpg

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Here is my Grandfather and another man cooking salmon they caught on Kiska. My Grandfather is the one holding the fish. As you can see, there does not seem to be much regularity regarding where the patch was worn. In some photos there are people who don't appear to be wearing it at all, most seem to have it on their right shoulder and others wear it on the left (or both shoulders).post-108788-0-26696700-1368022816.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

Currently I am the 17th Infantry Regiment (US) Association's Historian. I just started to receive all the boxes of donations the association has received from former members of the 17th Infantry Regiment.

This was in a 3-ring binder donated by a William S. Jones; Company G 17th Infantry Regiment 7th Infantry Division. He fought from the Battle for Attu to Battle for Leyte.

 

post-3699-0-92150400-1441344976.jpg

 

American by birth. Light Fighter by Choice!!!!

7th Infantry Division (Light) 82-93

4/9 IR, 3/17 IR, S3 3 Bde

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