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Old tired Hooker


hink441
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Here is something you don't see everyday. This is an A-6 tailhook. This hook was used and retired from service. You can see the wire slap marks on the face of the hook. We had to visually inspect these every 10 traps, any defects and they would be removed from service. Every 100 traps they would be x-rayed for structural damage. Every 500 traps they were retired from service and replaced. The floor tiles in the pictures are 12" tiles, so you can judge the size. These things are built like a battering ram and take alot of abuse. A heavy souvenir from from my USN NAVAIR career. Thanks for looking. :rolleyes:

 

Hook004.jpg

 

Hook003.jpg

 

Hook001.jpg

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You know, you have to respect the engineering behind these things. Everytime I see footage of a modern jet landing on a carrier, it's a wonder the tail section doesn't rip off. The forces and energy being brought to an abrupt stop must be tremendous.

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Yes I agree the engineering is really impressive. These hooks are installed with shear pins designed to fail at a certain pressure load so the entire tail of the aircraft is not ripped off during excessively hard landings.

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  • 1 month later...

What generally happened with them when they were all timed out? Did they just go overboard or is that prohibited these days? Or souvenirs?

 

MW

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Most of the time they were discarded or thrown over the side when they were used up. If I remember right, most of the hooks would not make it to the drop dead number of 500 traps. They took an incredible beating and would usually fail well before the max 500 recoveries. Some of the pilots would then attach mail boxes ontop of these old hooks and install them in the front yard.

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Misanthropic_Gods
Most of the time they were discarded or thrown over the side when they were used up. If I remember right, most of the hooks would not make it to the drop dead number of 500 traps. They took an incredible beating and would usually fail well before the max 500 recoveries. Some of the pilots would then attach mail boxes ontop of these old hooks and install them in the front yard.

 

Ha ha, lets see the Snow Plow driver try and knock that one over!

 

I have never actually taken a good look at the hook before, so this is an interesting thread.

 

What do you estimate it weighs?

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The hook itself weighs 34 lbs. In actual use when the pilot lowered the hook, the hook was held in the down position with IIRC a 1800psi nitrogen pre-load. This was used to prevent the hook from bouncing/slapping and skipping overtop of the arresting gear when landing.

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  • 1 year later...

Got some more NAVAIR stuff. Here is a used tailhook point from an F-14 Tomcat.

 

SANY0181.jpg

 

And this is a tailhook point from an S-3A Viking.

 

SANY0177.jpg

 

And this is a in-flight refueling probe.

 

SANY0182.jpg

 

Finally this is a rudder from an A-6 Intruder. Thanks for looking.

 

SANY0186.jpg

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You know, you have to respect the engineering behind these things. Everytime I see footage of a modern jet landing on a carrier, it's a wonder the tail section doesn't rip off. The forces and energy being brought to an abrupt stop must be tremendous.

Amen! :blink:

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The probe and the A-6 rudder are especially great items! Looks like you have a very interesting garage :)

 

MW

 

Thanks,

I definetly need to tidy up my garage. I do have some odd things in there. Most of this stuff was considered junk and was non-serviceable so I just collected it and saved it from the trash pile or the deep six. The call sign on the rudder is for VA-42. Thanks for looking.

 

Chris

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I'm surprised the Navy doesn't save these and make new hookers out of them. They could always be 'recycled' in the VIRGIN ISLANDS!! :lol:

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Yes I agree the engineering is really impressive. These hooks are installed with shear pins designed to fail at a certain pressure load so the entire tail of the aircraft is not ripped off during excessively hard landings.

 

:o

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Actually, I'm quite impressed with this thread. Probably the last thing a non-Naval person thinks about on an F-16 is the tails hook. I have learned a bit of information I will be able to add to conversation in the future. Thanks guys!

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Actually, I'm quite impressed with this thread. Probably the last thing a non-Naval person thinks about on an F-16 is the tails hook. I have learned a bit of information I will be able to add to conversation in the future. Thanks guys!

 

Actually the F-16 is an USAF jet but alot of people don't realize that the F-16 also has a tailhook. It is used for field arrested landings.

 

post-10825-1333570146.jpg

 

The F-14 has a much larger and stronger tailhook used for carrier landings and also field arrested landings.

 

post-10825-1333570281.jpg

 

Chris

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'm surprised the Navy doesn't save these and make new hookers out of them. They could always be 'recycled' in the VIRGIN ISLANDS!! :lol:

 

 

All old hookers are not the same. Some just stand around.

 

http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/

 

Visit the Naval Air Museum web site and take a look at the planes and placard stands.

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Steindaddie

Here's something for those who like their Hookers on the hefty side. From an A-3 Skywarrior, BuNo 138951. This beast is six feet long.

post-1949-1334720870.jpg

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Here's something for those who like their Hookers on the hefty side. From an A-3 Skywarrior, BuNo 138951. This beast is six feet long.

 

Now we're talking. That hook is a real beast. I remember when I first came in the Navy, they still had the A-3 on the carriers. It was always a treat to watch those huge jets come in and slam on the deck. Thanks for posting, I would love to have one of those!!

 

Chris

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