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Sabrejet
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Salvage Sailor

Observers armband and handbook from Island Assault Exercise MIKI (late 1949) 

From an (overpriced imho) auction listing that's been listed for months now

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MIKI (loosely translated) is the Hawaiian word for Readiness and E HELE KAUA means "Let's Go"

 

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easterneagle87

Here's an interesting shot. I just got a box with a lot of WW1 photos in it. Here is a picture post card size photo that was amongst the pile.

I think it is a WW1 era US Army MP, with an armband that say reads, "T POLICE"

Notice he is wearing a left handed .38 not a .45.  

Does the "T" stand for Transportation? Let me know, if you know.   

Photo_2022-05-02_145531.jpg

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Cobra 6 Actual

Hey, EE87, I think you need to check with World War I Nerd, since he’s the ranking expert on WWI armbands and more on here.

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  • 1 month later...

A Transportation Corps related Armband in the ETO,  a Colonel Richmond  in the Tanker Jacket and other staff examining maps at the 'Red Ball' headquarters, Alençon, France fall of 44. The U.S.A., U.S. Army of course, but do not know what TPH stands for, and can't tell what the other letters are after it, the CO......... Company, Column?????

njui.jpg

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Cobra 6 Actual

Patches, it might be that the letters are “TPN”, not “TPH” as in this photo from way back on Post #4:
 

image.jpeg.9abe852c1de302dc0c41bbd54a78405e.jpeg

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16 hours ago, Cobra 6 Actual said:

Patches, it might be that the letters are “TPN”, not “TPH” as in this photo from way back on Post #4:
 

image.jpeg.9abe852c1de302dc0c41bbd54a78405e.jpeg

That's it then, thanks for posting these, now the R.T.O. U.S.A. one, what does that stand for please?

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Cobra 6 Actual

Well, patches, in the mid-1960’s it stood for “Radio Telephone Operator”. But, I don’t know if that acronym was used as early as WWII, which is the era of that armband. 
 

Could also be for a “Railway Transport Officer”. I think this is the more probably meaning, but I’m just making an educated guess. We need someone to weigh in with more expertise.

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On 6/6/2022 at 8:52 PM, patches said:

That's it then, thanks for posting these, now the R.T.O. U.S.A. one, what does that stand for please?

From my MRS articles in The Trading Post, RTO = Rail Transportation Officer.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
Capt.Confederacy

Here's a couple of mine, Provost Sergeant and (I presume) Sergeant of the Guard)  These came from a WW2 Pacific Theater grouping which, among other interesting things, had a calendar in which several people in the original owner's unit made bets on when the war would end.

WW2 Armbands.jpg

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Cobra 6 Actual

Those are beauties, Capt. Confederacy! Plus you got them in a documented WWII group. As you know the military had a tendency to just keep using stuff. I have a couple of WWII “Acting Jack” armbands that I issued to Privates when I was a Drill Sergeant in the mid-1960’s. We were still using them as temporary unit leader insignia for the recruit platoons. The reason I bring all of that up is that your armbands have the look of WWI materials that probably were just continued to be used into WWII.

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Capt.Confederacy
On 8/13/2022 at 7:42 AM, Cobra 6 Actual said:

Those are beauties, Capt. Confederacy! Plus you got them in a documented WWII group. As you know the military had a tendency to just keep using stuff. I have a couple of WWII “Acting Jack” armbands that I issued to Privates when I was a Drill Sergeant in the mid-1960’s. We were still using them as temporary unit leader insignia for the recruit platoons. The reason I bring all of that up is that your armbands have the look of WWI materials that probably were just continued to be used into WWII.

Thank you for the response.  I had never thought that these might have been WW1 issue that just got tossed into a unit for WW2.  (Learn something new every day!)  Thanks again.

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A 1960s Armor AIT Brassard, the 1 on it may stand for the 1st Training Brigade at Knox, unknown purpose, maybe a distinguished graduate thing?

cav band.png

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Cobra 6 Actual

Patches, perhaps it’s a temporary leadership designator … if we could see the rest of that armband I’ll bet there’s Corporal or Sergeant stripes. Never saw an armband like that before and I was at Ft. Knox in the mid-1960’s as a Drill Sergeant in a BCT company. But I was pretty busy “harassing the troops”, so had no contact with my AIT counterparts. Still you’d think I would have seen something like that.
 

Also the leadership designators we issued to troops would never be worn by them in what appears to be a graduation photo. Good catch, patches!

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10 minutes ago, Cobra 6 Actual said:

A 26th Infantry Division AWOL Apprehension Military Police armband:

 

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Very cool Cobra 6, I wasn't aware they had their own AWOL Apprehension armbands. Nice!

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MinorInHistory

My Grandpa gave me this, it was his during the Vietnam Era. My uncle gave me a picture that he found of him and guess what I spotted? 

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