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Sabrejet

Thompson M1A1 SMG cleaning kit question

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A simple question really. Where would a GI armed with a Thompson M1A1 carry its oiler/ cleaning kit? Was there a "regulation" place? My M1A1 has a solid butt so it couldn't have been in there?! Thanks.

 

Sabrejet


"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Hi Ian,

All of the military Thompson buttstocks I have or have had, have a trap door and opening for the oiler bottle. The chamber brush and cleaning brush would be carried in a leather box that could be carried in your pack. The cleaning rod is sometimes seen thrust down inside the haversack with the ring sticking out the top, or may have been carried in unit supply. I remember that some of the replica Thompsons available out of Japan didn't have the oiler hole, or perhaps your TSMG has a replaced buttplate.

Tom Bowers

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Hi Ian,

All of the military Thompson buttstocks I have or have had, have a trap door and opening for the oiler bottle. The chamber brush and cleaning brush would be carried in a leather box that could be carried in your pack. The cleaning rod is sometimes seen thrust down inside the haversack with the ring sticking out the top, or may have been carried in unit supply. I remember that some of the replica Thompsons available out of Japan didn't have the oiler hole, or perhaps your TSMG has a replaced buttplate.

Tom Bowers

 

Thanks Tom. I just checked my Thompson (which I've had for about 15 years) It's quite minty and still has/had a layer of waxy cosmoline (?) on the buttplate. I just scraped some of it away and guess what...yup...a hinged trap!! All this time and I wasn't aware of it! DOH!! How to look dumb in public!!

 

Ian :blush:


"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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HI Ian,

From " American Thunder, the military Thompson Submachine gun" by Frank Iannamico.

" The M1-M1A1 style butt plate (ASN A032-01-00719) was a sheet metal stamping with the exception of the swivel pin. The cost of the M1-M1A1 butt plate was reduced to 44 cents. Total operations to manufacture a stamped butt plate were 24 requiring 8 minutes. Both designs (1928 and M1-M1A1 ed.) featured a hole in the wood stock that normally housed an oil container. The butt plates are not interchangable between m1928A1 and M1-M1A1 models. Butt plates were manufactured from 1010steel. "

He doesn't document a model without the olier hole. Maybe someone else has one too? Have you checked under the butt plate to see if the wood has the hole? That is very interesting.

Tom Bowers

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Tom...I must've edited my post as you were adding yours. My bad!!

 

Ian :blink:


"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Ian,

Its not too hard to believe. I'm always amazed by the fantastic fit and finish on military TSMGs, even those made during the worst months of the war. Your oiler hole is so well machined and fitted that it really is hard to see. Darn, I was hoping to document some rare variation.

Tom Bowers

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Ian,

Its not too hard to believe. I'm always amazed by the fantastic fit and finish on military TSMGs, even those made during the worst months of the war. Your oiler hole is so well machined and fitted that it really is hard to see. Darn, I was hoping to document some rare variation.

Tom Bowers

 

 

You're not wrong there Tom! It's so flush with the plate it's barely discernable. The cosmoline just served to fill what tiny gaps there are around the hinge and the notch where you flip it out...virtually invisible like that..hence my error!

 

Ian :thumbsup:


"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

donation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

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