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.30 M2 Ball dated 1943 Alternative


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Picked up 6 cans of 30 cal ball ammo today. 4 cans from St Louis Ord plant and 2 from Utah Ord plant.

 

Opened one of the SL cans , the only one that was a little dented and found it was dated 1943! My favorite year to collect. Doubt if I am going to keep it all, I may shoot a little of it. So if there are any collectors out there who would like some I am probably going to sell some in the near future.

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Chunky Monkey, You can put me down for some when you get the inkling to pass some on... :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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Chunky Monkey, You can put me down for some when you get the inkling to pass some on... :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

 

 

Definately will! I will probably have a for sale ad sometime this weekend or next week! If you want on a list shoot me a PM or post here. I will ad a link here when I do.

 

Thanks

Kevin

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Caliber .30 M2 ALTERNATIVE

wonder what it is an alternative of??

 

EDIT- found some info ...... looks like it could be Armor Piercing (AP) alternative?

 

.30 Caliber M2 Specifications from "Hatcher's Notebook"

 

The following are from pages 35-37 of "Hatcher's Notebook", by Julian S Hatcher, Major General, U.S. Army, retired, The Telegraph Press, 1947.

 

Notice that the .30 Caliber M2 Ball round as standardized by the U.S. military is not the same as the .30-06 Springfield round. They are very similar, but not exactly the same thing.

 

I think it would be accurate to say that .30-06 Springfield is a more general category, and the .30 Caliber M2 Ball is one more specific specification.

 

"Hatcher's Notebook" includes ballistic tables showing slight differences between generic Springfield .30-06 and the M2 and armor-piercing M2. One of those tables is reproduced in the next section.

Cartridge, Ball, cal .30 M2 (Gilded) and M2 alternative (Steel Socketed)

 

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I wondered that myself. It is magnetic! Not an ammo expert but I though ball ammo was lead in a guilded metal jacket.

 

Caliber .30 M2 ALTERNATIVE

wonder what it is an alternative of??

 

EDIT- found some info ...... looks like it could be Armor Piercing (AP) alternative?

 

.30 Caliber M2 Specifications from "Hatcher's Notebook"

 

The following are from pages 35-37 of "Hatcher's Notebook", by Julian S Hatcher, Major General, U.S. Army, retired, The Telegraph Press, 1947.

 

Notice that the .30 Caliber M2 Ball round as standardized by the U.S. military is not the same as the .30-06 Springfield round. They are very similar, but not exactly the same thing.

 

I think it would be accurate to say that .30-06 Springfield is a more general category, and the .30 Caliber M2 Ball is one more specific specification.

 

"Hatcher's Notebook" includes ballistic tables showing slight differences between generic Springfield .30-06 and the M2 and armor-piercing M2. One of those tables is reproduced in the next section.

Cartridge, Ball, cal .30 M2 (Gilded) and M2 alternative (Steel Socketed)

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I wondered that myself. It is magnetic! Not an ammo expert but I though ball ammo was lead in a guilded metal jacket.

it is.....I just edited my post to add a picture also.....it does look like it could be AP!

whatever it is....it looks like it is in awesome shape for its age.....I would shoot it in a heartbeat!!

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This ammunition looks like it was manufactured for Commonwealth forces. For the Commonwealth forces, the red band indicates 30.06 calibre ammunition and the boxes are strikingly similar to ones that I own. I believe blue banded 30.06 boxes indicate AP ammunition although you can also tell by the colour coding on the tip of the cartridge and annulus around the primer.

 

Besides the M1919A4 Machine Gun, some Commonwealth countries employed the M1917 or P17 Rifle which was red banded on the stock to indicate 30.06 and to differentiate it from the .303 P14 Rifle.

 

Your M2 Ball packaging does not seem to conform to the standardized US packing of the period, which also leads me to believe that it was manufactured for Allied use. Either way, I doubt I would want to shoot such nice ammunition and would look at preserving it.

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I wondered that myself. It is magnetic! Not an ammo expert but I though ball ammo was lead in a guilded metal jacket.

 

One way to tell if it has metal core or if the guilding has magnetic steel in it. If the bullet sticks to the magnet with some real force, it has a steel core. If it is kind of lazy in it's attachment, then the jacket guilding has some steel as part of it's base. If the magnet will not hold the entire round weight, then just the jacket has magnetic properties. Also, just because it does stick hard, doesn't mean it is AP. Soft steel was tested and used as a core for some time. While magnetic, it is not armor piercing. The current .50 ammo has a steel core, but only AP has the tungsten penetrator.


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M2 Alternative means the jacket material is not guilding metal but steel. They used this is WWII as an alternative to guilding metal because of the shortage of copper. They used steel with a thin layer of guilding metal over it. The ammunition plants did this in later years following WWII depending on which material was cheaper at the time. It was found there was no appreciable difference in bore erosion whether using guilding metal or steel.

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Exactly ~ I will probably shoot a little thru my M1903A3 but none thru my M1. Just enough to see how accurate it is.

 

Don't be afraid to shoot it in your Garand---I do---just make sure that you strip it and clean it thoroughly. That goes for 03's, 03A3's 1917's, etc. also. :thumbsup:

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Don't be afraid to shoot it in your Garand---I do---just make sure that you strip it and clean it thoroughly. That goes for 03's, 03A3's 1917's, etc. also. :thumbsup:

 

 

I got plenty of Greek and reloaded ammo to run thru the M1. Just want to check the accuracy of it. May also run some thru the chrono to see how it compares to other ammo!

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If it was AP, it would have a black tip and the box would read "AP", to my knowledge

 

RE: shooting old ammo- the corrosive primers are a concern, sure. Regular hoppe's won't do the trick.

 

But in 2008, I was shooting an 03A3, 1943 LC M2 ball. We had just opened the spam can. Case ruptured, scorched my shooting glasses. Visually, all the cases looked fine. Somewhere I have the brass from that round. Not only was the scorch startling, I had to run a rod through the barrel to make sure the bullet came out! Sixty eight years (nearly) is a long time ago and there was a war on; a bad round or two undoubtedly got issued. Just saying

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I wondered that myself. It is magnetic! Not an ammo expert but I though ball ammo was lead in a guilded metal jacket.

 

 

Alternative ball ammo was steel jacketed.It was an effort to conserve strategic materials.The red stripe on the box identifies it as M2 Ball.Information is from TM 9-1990.

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