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Here are three different boxes of military ammo for the .38DA service revolver, 1892-1903. There should be another box or two used prior to the 1902 box and perhaps others. Does anyone have any examples of boxes different from the 3 that I have? Thanks.

Check out my website of Military Relics and Collectibles: http://www.ourboysof98.com
I try to update it by adding several new items each month, so keep checking back.

Thanks,
keith

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Here are three different boxes of military ammo for the .38DA service revolver, 1892-1903. There should be another box or two used prior to the 1902 box and perhaps others. Does anyone have any examples of boxes different from the 3 that I have? Thanks.

 

The best source of information that I have found is "The Pitman Notes on U.S. Martial Small Arms and Ammunition 1776-1933, Volume Two", pages 69-100. Shown on page 86 are two examples of early boxes, slightly different than the above dated 1902 box. Also shown are boxes similar to the above dated 1905 box, but manufactured by Western, Winchester, and U.M.C. In addition there are shown several boxes for blanks and dummy cartridges.

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can this be another stump robin item. Do you have the revolver? Robert

I only have two left...

1. An early army with 1904 rebuild.

2. 1895 issue to New Jersey Naval Militia

1904_38_rig.jpg

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Check out my website of Military Relics and Collectibles: http://www.ourboysof98.com
I try to update it by adding several new items each month, so keep checking back.

Thanks,
keith

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can this be another stump robin item. Do you have the revolver? Robert

Robert, I have the Army M1901 and M1903, plus the USMC M1905 revolvers. Plus all of the matching holster types.

 

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The best source of information that I have found is "The Pitman Notes on U.S. Martial Small Arms and Ammunition 1776-1933, Volume Two", pages 69-100. Shown on page 86 are two examples of early boxes, slightly different than the above dated 1902 box. Also shown are boxes similar to the above dated 1905 box, but manufactured by Western, Winchester, and U.M.C. In addition there are shown several boxes for blanks and dummy cartridges.

Thanks for that recommendation. I have not heard of that book but will see if my lending library can get it for me. keith

Check out my website of Military Relics and Collectibles: http://www.ourboysof98.com
I try to update it by adding several new items each month, so keep checking back.

Thanks,
keith

donation2011.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

 

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Here are three different boxes of military ammo for the .38DA service revolver, 1892-1903. There should be another box or two used prior to the 1902 box and perhaps others. Does anyone have any examples of boxes different from the 3 that I have? Thanks.

 

If you have an interest in Colt New Army Revolvers, I suggest acquiring a book titled, "A Study of Colt's New Army and Navy Pattern Double Action Revolvers," by Robert Best, published by InstantPublisher.com in 2004. It is a 276-page hardcover book that has the greatest detail on these firearms. The cartridge box on the top and bottom of Keith's picture above are included in the book, with the top box dated 1910, and the bottom box dated 1902. The book indicates the boxes of 20 were packed in crates of 50 boxes for a total of 1000 cartridges. It also quotes an Army report indicating that each cartridge was loaded with 16 grains of small-arms powder, and a primer containing .1 grains of fulminating powder, topped with a lubricated 150-grain lead bullet.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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If you have an interest in Colt New Army Revolvers, I suggest acquiring a book titled, "A Study of Colt's New Army and Navy Pattern Double Action Revolvers," by Robert Best, published by InstantPublisher.com in 2004. It is a 276-page hardcover book that has the greatest detail on these firearms. The cartridge box on the top and bottom of Keith's picture above are included in the book, with the top box dated 1910, and the bottom box dated 1902. The book indicates the boxes of 20 were packed in crates of 50 boxes for a total of 1000 cartridges. It also quotes an Army report indicating that each cartridge was loaded with 16 grains of small-arms powder, and a primer containing .1 grains of fulminating powder, topped with a lubricated 150-grain lead bullet.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

Thanks David. I do have Bob's book. I bought it just about a month ago from him. If anyone is interested the cost was $91 delivered. It is a second printing as the first printing is sold out and copies are expensive. The second printing, I feel, is a less quality book with most of the pages flat and not glossy like the original. Also the binding is different as I recall. However, the information is the same and for research it has the same data as the first printing. The last sentance in the ammo section you referenced said there were 2,750,000 cartridges produced by 1894. Those early boxes are what I was hoping to see, but perhaps they were all used during the Spanish American and Philippine Wars. The 1902 box is the oldest I have personally seen and is the oldest in the book. I would have to look, but I may have some loose cartridges with earlier headstamps than 1902. Regards.

Check out my website of Military Relics and Collectibles: http://www.ourboysof98.com
I try to update it by adding several new items each month, so keep checking back.

Thanks,
keith

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Keith,

 

I didn't know the Robert Best book had gone into a second printing. I bought mine about 5 years ago, and I'm not sure how many copies are in existence. This book is a very good example of the type of niche publishing that is now possible through technology. It was unlikely to be picked up and marketed by a mainstream publisher, but the author felt strongly enough about his work on the subject that he published it himself through the online publishing tool offered by the company he chose. I've actually looked at the same avenue myself.

 

I have a Model 1901 Colt New Army with "JTT" inspection markings on it. John Taliaferro Thompson, the namesake of the Thompson Submachine Gun, was the Army Inspector of Pistols from 1901 to 1903, and that's why I acquired it for my collection.

 

I will keep an eye out for early .38 revolver ammo. I know someone online who is likely to have a picture of an early box, if any still exist.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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Keith,

 

This book is a very good example of the type of niche publishing that is now possible through technology.

I have a Model 1901 Colt New Army with "JTT" inspection markings on it. John Taliaferro Thompson, the namesake of the Thompson Submachine Gun, was the Army Inspector of Pistols from 1901 to 1903, and that's why I acquired it for my collection.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

David. I was unaware of that publication option, thanks. With interest I gather you like Thompsons? I supposedly have a rear sight from a Thompson. If you have interest send me a PM or email and I will send you a photo. Thanks, keith

Check out my website of Military Relics and Collectibles: http://www.ourboysof98.com
I try to update it by adding several new items each month, so keep checking back.

Thanks,
keith

donation2011.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

 

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Thanks for that recommendation. I have not heard of that book but will see if my lending library can get it for me. keith

 

 

I sometimes use this site to see who has a book http://www.worldcat.org They have a search feature using your zip code to locate libraries near you.The ISBN number for Pitman Vol.2 is "ISBN-0-939631-32-6 The Pitman books are one of the few you can find detailed information in on cartridge boxes and packets as far as size and construction along with labels.

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