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Collector5516
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Croix de Guerre

A very, very rare example of a French made albumen photograph complete with original Art Deco style mat. This photo came from a Virginia estate and initially I had no idea of the identity of these soldiers. Upon examining the photo closely I was able to make out an address written in ink on the top left corner. Mrs. Sara Huff #300 West High Street, Richmond, Va from Corp. Emmet (?) and it was identified on the back as Post Montierchaume , Indre, France. There were two main military organizations that were comprised of African American draftees from Virginia, the 510th and the 511th Engineer Service Battalions. The 510th was organized at Camp Lee, Virginia in January of 1918 and arrived in France in April 1918. Upon arrival the battalion was immediately dispersed to various posts all across France, one of the companies even being sent to work in the cement mills at Swanscombe, New Kent, England! (Now THAT would’ve tested your patriotism!) Company C was initially sent to Jonchery but in August they were transferred to Camp Montierchaume just in time to have this wonderful photo taken! An interesting study of WWI American headgear can be made from this photo, a wide variety of American made side caps can be seen, distinguished by the smaller profile, several of the larger French Style caps are present, along with a couple of examples of the British style caps with the two buttons on the front. Of special interest is the rubber trench boots that several of the men are wearing, a testament to the muddy conditions these men had to work in. French Albumen Photograph

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Croix de Guerre
A very, very rare example of a French made albumen photograph complete with original Art Deco style mat. This photo came from a Virginia estate and initially I had no idea of the identity of these soldiers. Upon examining the photo closely I was able to make out an address written in ink on the top left corner. Mrs. Sara Huff #300 West High Street, Richmond, Va from Corp. Emmet (?) and it was identified on the back as Post Montierchaume , Indre, France. There were two main military organizations that were comprised of African American draftees from Virginia, the 510th and the 511th Engineer Service Battalions. The 510th was organized at Camp Lee, Virginia in January of 1918 and arrived in France in April 1918. Upon arrival the battalion was immediately dispersed to various posts all across France, one of the companies even being sent to work in the cement mills at Swanscombe, New Kent, England! (Now THAT would’ve tested your patriotism!) Company C was initially sent to Jonchery but in August they were transferred to Camp Montierchaume just in time to have this wonderful photo taken! An interesting study of WWI American headgear can be made from this photo, a wide variety of American made side caps can be seen, distinguished by the smaller profile, several of the larger French Style caps are present, along with a couple of examples of the British style caps with the two buttons on the front. Of special interest is the rubber trench boots that several of the men are wearing, a testament to the muddy conditions these men had to work in. French Albumen Photograph

post-3356-1289186347.jpg

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Croix de Guerre

Pvt. George Biggs and his buddy Pvt. George Vernall , 372nd “Red Hand” Infantry, 1919, New Haven, Connecticut. The 372nd was one of four all black infantry regiments that comprised the 93rd Division that were brigaded with the French army during WWI. It was initially comprised of the First Separate Battalion of the District of Columbia; the 9th Ohio Separate Battalion; Company L of Massachusetts; the First Separate Company of Connecticut; the First Separate Company of Maryland, (all these being National Guard troops) and drafted men primarily from Michigan and Wisconsin. While in service with the French army it was assigned to the 157th Division known as the “Red Hand Division”, alluding to the bloody hands of it’s soldiers due to their fondness for hand-to-hand fighting. American Real Photo Postcard

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Collector5516

These photos are absolutely fantastic! Each and every one is a fascinating and important part of our history. Thank you very much for sharing them with me and the rest of the forum.

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Pvt. George Biggs and his buddy Pvt. George Vernall , 372nd “Red Hand” Infantry, 1919, New Haven, Connecticut. The 372nd was one of four all black infantry regiments that comprised the 93rd Division that were brigaded with the French army during WWI. It was initially comprised of the First Separate Battalion of the District of Columbia; the 9th Ohio Separate Battalion; Company L of Massachusetts; the First Separate Company of Connecticut; the First Separate Company of Maryland, (all these being National Guard troops) and drafted men primarily from Michigan and Wisconsin. While in service with the French army it was assigned to the 157th Division known as the “Red Hand Division”, alluding to the bloody hands of it’s soldiers due to their fondness for hand-to-hand fighting. American Real Photo Postcard

 

Croix de Guerre,

 

You may be interested in seeing this:

 

http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/i...edhandflag.html

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Croix de Guerre
Croix de Guerre,

 

You may be interested in seeing this:

 

http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/i...edhandflag.html

 

Thanks for the link Gun, I saw that back in the day when it first came out. I published most of my collection along with some amazing photos from some collector friends of mine a few years ago in a issue of Military Images magazine and recently I allowed my photos to be published in a Schifer book titled "Willing Patriots".

 

Unknown decorated Captain from the Richmond, Virginia estate of Mrs. Rachel Farrar. Mrs. Farrar was the wife of the first black man to be appointed to the Richmond City Council. This proud young officer wears a Washington D.C. Victory medal, what appears to be a ribbon from the Mexican Punitive Expedition, a sharp shooters decoration and two other unknown ribbons. The “Sam Browne” shoulder belt he wears also denotes him as a returned veteran from France. This unknown officer is most likely a veteran of the 372nd and was a member of the DC National Gaurd. American Studio Portrait, Spurlock Studios, Washington D.C.

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Hi Collector and Hi all

 

Not a period pic but rather rushs of one of my future mannequin (portraying the 333 FAB and others Black eto units in the Ardennes)

 

I think that finally to be matching the periods pics i'm gonna put an helmet, a carbine, a overcoat (with pants , overshoes etc ...)

 

Then i'm asking myself if i put the usual suspender rig ?

(the guys were in a hurry being sudently attacked and overrun in the middle of a very dense forrest where you can hardly know where you can run. Not sure they fled with all their webgear as i guess that already had the fatigue AND the coat. It's alreday feeling like being a horse towing a wagon)

 

I'm also think about nip tucking his global way of standing display

 

Your opinions are welcome

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Although not worn by an African-American, this insignia was worn by a white officer assigned to an Black regiment, the 803rd Pioneer Infantry Regiment, during the First World War.

 

post-203-1289747864.jpg

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Here's a small group of items I received from a coworker last year or maybe the year before. The 1945 dated photo is of her uncle, Wrennie Cosby, from Dayton, Ohio and the uniform was the one he wore when he got out of the service. I also have a copy of his discharge paperwork that shows he was a member of the 446th Quartermaster Truck Company in Europe during the war.

I haven't changed a thing on his uniform as it is just the way it came out of his closet. I never met the man but he was very proud of his service.

Kim

 

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Here is a picture of a truck drivers graduation class. I have this as part of a grouping. Capt. W.L. Lincoln's (Lt. at the time this pic was taken-far right of the 1004th Boat Co., Aviation, Port O'Connor, Tx.) brother served with the 5th Royal Canadian Artillery.

 

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Heres some VN stuff:

 

IMG_7025.jpg

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IMG_7022-1.jpg

 

These dog tags were worn in VN. Came in a small lot of items found inside a PX bought camera & accessory case including his VN photos, medals, and a well worn 3" high black cross made of a boot lace. I think the cross was worn as a necklace. Not sure if the black color of the cross represented anything Black related.

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I think I still have a copy of "Guess whose coming home" It was pretty wild to listen to.

 

I am always on the lookout to see or hear about stuff relating to the the 1945 Negro Volunteer Infnatry in the ETO.

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teufelhunde.ret

african_americans_wwii_177.jpg

Sergeant Major Gilbert "Hashmark" Johnson, one of the first African-Americans to enlist in the Marine Corps, died of a heart attack on 5 August 1972 in Jacksonville, North Carolina, while addressing an annual meeting of the Montford Point Marine Association.

 

Born in rural Mount Hebron, Alabama, Johnson attended Stillman College in 1922, aspiring to become a minister. He left college the following year, however, and joined the Army. At the end of his enlistment in October 1929, Johnson was discharged as a corporal. After four years of civilian life, he decided to try the Navy. The Navy accepted Johnson into the teward's Branch, the only job available to blacks at that time, and he served for nearly10 years. Johnson was aboard the USS Wyoming during the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. The following year, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the integration of the armed forces, Johnson requested transfer form the Navy to the Marine Corps. He went on to serve the last 17 of his 32-year military career in the Marine Corps. Throughout his Marine Corps career Johnson provided leadership to his younger and less experienced comrades. It was at Montford Point he was given the name "Hashmark," because of his age and many years of service.

 

In 1943, he was among the first black men to be trained as Marine drill instructors. He also served as field sergeant in charge of all recruit training at Montford Point. As a member of the 52d Defense Battalion on Guam in World War II, "Hashmark" asked that black Marines be assigned to combat patrols from which they were currently exempt. Once approved, he personally led 25 combat patrols.

 

Johnson later served in Korea with the 1st Shore Party Battalion, then later with 2d Battalion, 1st Marines, and finally as administrative advisor at the Headquarters of the Korean Marine Corps. Asked if he had experienced any problems as a senior black NCO serving in predominantly white units, Johnson characteristically said "I didn't encounter any difficulty. I accepted each individual for what he was and apparently they accepted me for what I was."

 

Johnson went on to become one of the first black sergeants major in the Marine Corps. Sergeant Major Johnson transferred to the Fleet Marine Force Reserve in 1957 and retired in 1959. On 19 April 1974, the Montford Point facility at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, was dedicated as Camp Gilbert H. Johnson, Montford Point, Camp Lejeune, in honor of this outstanding Marine.

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