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Let's see your Black/African-American Related Militaria


Collector5516
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Collector5516

I have an interest in collecting military items relating to Black soldiers and I thought others might too. I'll start this thread off by showing some of my postcards.

 

WWI RPPC of three soldiers of the Gold Brick Orchestra. I haven't been able to find any info on this group so please share if you know something!

 

GoldBrickOrchestra.jpg

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Collector5516

WWI Postcard labeled "Homeward Bound- One of the Daily Concerts By Co. F. 28th Engineers U.S.S. Patricia June 26, 1919".

 

BlackBandShip.jpg

 

BlackBandShip1.jpg

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Collector5516

WWI Soldier. Id'd on reverse as Peter Jones, Rochell, GA. Seems to have been given to a Mrs. Ella Daniels

 

WWIBlackPostcards.jpg

 

This second card came with the first and is identified on the back as Jine (?) Jones, Kenasaw, GA. He only has one collar disc that I can't quite make out and he is wearing an armband with an interlocking "SE". Any ideas?

 

WWIBlackPostcards2.jpg

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Croix de Guerre

I'll share some of mine, or at least what used to be mine. I cashed them all in to help pay for Waldo Peirce.

 

I nice colorized photo of a veteran of the 25th Infantry. They stayed stateside during the war. Note; he is wearing silver service stripes denoting service in the US.

 

Hand tinted American Studio Portrait of a decorated soldier from the 25th Infantry regiment. Prior to America’s entry into the Great War there were four original “colored” regiments in the National Army. They were comprised of the following; the 9th and 10th Cavalry and the 24th and 25th Infantry. These were the original “Buffalo Soldiers” of Indian fighting fame. The 25th in particular served with distinction during the Spanish-American War. The 25th is most famous or infamous for it’s involvement in the 1906 “Brownsville Incident” in which several members of the regiment were accused of various crimes including the rape of a white woman, and the subsequent murder of several civilians in the resulting race riot. Despite the lack of evidence, including a Texas grand jury’s refusal to indict twelve of the accused soldiers, the Army’s board of inquiry and it’s Inspector General ordered that all 167 soldiers of the First Battalion be dishonorably discharged and drummed out of the service. During the First World War these old established regiments were left either patrolling the deserts of the American West or in garrison in the Phillippines.

post-3356-1289066658.jpg

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Croix de Guerre

An extremely rare French postcard showing the regimental band of the 803rd Pioneer Infantry taken March 18, 1919 in Chambery, France. Pioneer Infantry were special troops who although trained, armed and able to fight as infantry were specifically employed to “follow an attack and make immediate repairs to roads and installations; and at the same time being prepared to fight if needed.” Pershing’s Pioneers, chp1 pg1. The 803rd was one of the more famous of these organizations and were known as “those terrible Illinois lads” with a sizable portion being draftees from the Chicago area. Regimental bands were a long tradition in the military and greatly continued to the moral of the men and the bands of black Pioneer Infantry regiments were considered to be some of the best. Many of these bands employed former professional jazz musicians that they found drafted into their midst and consequently they helped introduced the “jazz germ” to the admiring French population. In this remarkable photograph French civilians can be seen posing side by side with the soldiers of the 803rd and under close examination a black woman can be seen sitting in the center of the men. I believe that this woman is none other than Addie W. Hunton, one of the very few African American woman YMCA workers that were allowed to come to France. In her book “Two Colored Women with the A.E.F.” Mrs. Hunton specifically speaks of visiting the “her regiment”, the 803rd at Chambery. French Carte Postale Real Photo Postcard

post-3356-1289067100.jpg

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Croix de Guerre

An extremely rare original French press photo of the 15th New York Infantry band playing at the welcome reception for the grand opening of the soldiers rest area at Aix-Les-Baines, France. The 15th New York Infantry (National Guard) , better known as the 369th Harlem Hellfighters was one the most famous regiments to come out of WWI. They were originally formed from volunteers from the metropolitan New York area and initially had both black and white officers. One of the most famous of these was Lt. James Reese Europe who led the famous Hellfighters band. In peace time Jim Europe was a famous band leader and songwriter who is credited with being one of the early pioneers of the Jazz age. After reluctantly agreeing to lead the band, (he originally enlisted as a combat soldier not as a musician) he insisted that since his name and reputation were to be associated with this organization he must have full control. Another stipulation was that in order to be an effective band the number of musicians must be increased beyond the what army regulations would allow. Musicians were paid at a higher rate than ordinary enlisted men but the paymaster would only allow for twenty-eight musicians on the rolls. Jim was adamant that forty-four was the minimum number that would adequate for his band. Consequently a secret “slush” fund of money was raised from members of New York’s high society to fund the operation. Jim began to enlist the best musicians he could find, even going so far as to travel to Puerto Rico to find qualified clarinet and saxophone players. Under his leadership the band became the premier regimental band in the entire A.E.F.. The skill and professionalism of the band combined with the addition of Jazz syncopated rhythms set them far and beyond any other Army band at the time.

This particular photo was taken early in 1918 at the opening of the Soldier’s rest area at the famous thermal spas at Aix-Les-Baines, France. “Aches and Pains” as it later became known to the doughboys was an R&R center near Nice that was run by the YMCA. It was used to allow battle-weary doughboys fresh from the front a place to recuperate that was controlled and keep our cleaned limbed young lads out of the bars and flesh pots of decadent France. In this rare photo, the band came be seen arrayed in formation and Lt. Europe can be seen directing the band with baton raised at the center right. The band’s orders called for a two-week tour of duty at this camp, but after hearing them play the authorities extended their stay an additional two weeks. While they were away the regiment who after arriving in France had been put to work as labor troops finally was given a combat assignment. Orders came down from headquarters directing them to report to the 16th Division of the French army. Soon after the band’s stay was cut short and they were ordered to rejoin the regiment now renamed “Trois Cent Soixante Neuvieme R.I.U.S”. Three weeks after arriving in their new sector Lt. Europe became the first black American officer to see combat in WWI. Original French Press Photo, Emile Barriere Photo Press Service, 16 Rue Bachaumont, Paris

post-3356-1289067433.jpg

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Croix de Guerre
An extremely rare original French press photo of the 15th New York Infantry band playing at the welcome reception for the grand opening of the soldiers rest area at Aix-Les-Baines, France. The 15th New York Infantry (National Guard) , better known as the 369th Harlem Hellfighters was one the most famous regiments to come out of WWI. They were originally formed from volunteers from the metropolitan New York area and initially had both black and white officers. One of the most famous of these was Lt. James Reese Europe who led the famous Hellfighters band. In peace time Jim Europe was a famous band leader and songwriter who is credited with being one of the early pioneers of the Jazz age. After reluctantly agreeing to lead the band, (he originally enlisted as a combat soldier not as a musician) he insisted that since his name and reputation were to be associated with this organization he must have full control. Another stipulation was that in order to be an effective band the number of musicians must be increased beyond the what army regulations would allow. Musicians were paid at a higher rate than ordinary enlisted men but the paymaster would only allow for twenty-eight musicians on the rolls. Jim was adamant that forty-four was the minimum number that would adequate for his band. Consequently a secret “slush” fund of money was raised from members of New York’s high society to fund the operation. Jim began to enlist the best musicians he could find, even going so far as to travel to Puerto Rico to find qualified clarinet and saxophone players. Under his leadership the band became the premier regimental band in the entire A.E.F.. The skill and professionalism of the band combined with the addition of Jazz syncopated rhythms set them far and beyond any other Army band at the time.

This particular photo was taken early in 1918 at the opening of the Soldier’s rest area at the famous thermal spas at Aix-Les-Baines, France. “Aches and Pains” as it later became known to the doughboys was an R&R center near Nice that was run by the YMCA. It was used to allow battle-weary doughboys fresh from the front a place to recuperate that was controlled and keep our cleaned limbed young lads out of the bars and flesh pots of decadent France. In this rare photo, the band came be seen arrayed in formation and Lt. Europe can be seen directing the band with baton raised at the center right. The band’s orders called for a two-week tour of duty at this camp, but after hearing them play the authorities extended their stay an additional two weeks. While they were away the regiment who after arriving in France had been put to work as labor troops finally was given a combat assignment. Orders came down from headquarters directing them to report to the 16th Division of the French army. Soon after the band’s stay was cut short and they were ordered to rejoin the regiment now renamed “Trois Cent Soixante Neuvieme R.I.U.S”. Three weeks after arriving in their new sector Lt. Europe became the first black American officer to see combat in WWI. Original French Press Photo, Emile Barriere Photo Press Service, 16 Rue Bachaumont, Paris

post-3356-1289068267.jpg

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Croix de Guerre
An extremely rare original French press photo of the 15th New York Infantry band playing at the welcome reception for the grand opening of the soldiers rest area at Aix-Les-Baines, France. The 15th New York Infantry (National Guard) , better known as the 369th Harlem Hellfighters was one the most famous regiments to come out of WWI. They were originally formed from volunteers from the metropolitan New York area and initially had both black and white officers. One of the most famous of these was Lt. James Reese Europe who led the famous Hellfighters band. In peace time Jim Europe was a famous band leader and songwriter who is credited with being one of the early pioneers of the Jazz age. After reluctantly agreeing to lead the band, (he originally enlisted as a combat soldier not as a musician) he insisted that since his name and reputation were to be associated with this organization he must have full control. Another stipulation was that in order to be an effective band the number of musicians must be increased beyond the what army regulations would allow. Musicians were paid at a higher rate than ordinary enlisted men but the paymaster would only allow for twenty-eight musicians on the rolls. Jim was adamant that forty-four was the minimum number that would adequate for his band. Consequently a secret “slush” fund of money was raised from members of New York’s high society to fund the operation. Jim began to enlist the best musicians he could find, even going so far as to travel to Puerto Rico to find qualified clarinet and saxophone players. Under his leadership the band became the premier regimental band in the entire A.E.F.. The skill and professionalism of the band combined with the addition of Jazz syncopated rhythms set them far and beyond any other Army band at the time.

This particular photo was taken early in 1918 at the opening of the Soldier’s rest area at the famous thermal spas at Aix-Les-Baines, France. “Aches and Pains” as it later became known to the doughboys was an R&R center near Nice that was run by the YMCA. It was used to allow battle-weary doughboys fresh from the front a place to recuperate that was controlled and keep our cleaned limbed young lads out of the bars and flesh pots of decadent France. In this rare photo, the band came be seen arrayed in formation and Lt. Europe can be seen directing the band with baton raised at the center right. The band’s orders called for a two-week tour of duty at this camp, but after hearing them play the authorities extended their stay an additional two weeks. While they were away the regiment who after arriving in France had been put to work as labor troops finally was given a combat assignment. Orders came down from headquarters directing them to report to the 16th Division of the French army. Soon after the band’s stay was cut short and they were ordered to rejoin the regiment now renamed “Trois Cent Soixante Neuvieme R.I.U.S”. Three weeks after arriving in their new sector Lt. Europe became the first black American officer to see combat in WWI. Original French Press Photo, Emile Barriere Photo Press Service, 16 Rue Bachaumont, Paris

post-3356-1289068371.jpg

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craig johnson

Has to be one of my favorite photos of a Hand cart

 

1939 M4A1 30 Cal. Mach. Gun Cart Serial number 1098 or 1099

 

617385674_i2h2M-L.jpg

 

384878866_rLbob-X2-1.jpg

 

Think this is a NARA photo

 

42003347_JqQBN-O.jpg

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Posted this in with the Camo Liners in Use topic the other day as well.

 

 

post-729-1289074456.jpg

 

Just an fyi, also pictured along with the soldiers is famous singer and actress Lena Horne, who just

passed away in May at the age of 92.

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