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I am in no way saying these weapons were used by the US in combat, but last year when I was in New Zealand, I saw a picture of a US soldier training in New Zealand carrying No4 MkI* (the * denotes a Savage or Long Branch Enfield). The No4 MkI* were sent to New Zealand but were instead used by the New Zealand Home Guard while the older No1 MKIIIs were issued to the 2nd and 3rd New Zealand Divisions. My guess is a US soldier/marine was training with the New Zealand Home Guard and was messing around with the rifle while someone took a picture. I know this really is not historically important, but I thought it was interesting and hopefully not too off-topic. If you do make it to New Zealand, please try to hit the New Zealand Army Museum in Waiouru, it is worth the visit and has a fair share of US items especially related to New Zealand's contribution to the war in the Pacific and Vietnam.

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I've seen one in .410 gauge, used as a Prison Guard weapon.

Looking for for 37th Division

VietNam and earlier Special Forces &

USS Hemminger DE 746 items

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Actually the first 200,000 made by Savage were from a direct order for the British and were not "U.S. Property", the remaining approx. million were from an order from our government to be furnished on the lease-lend program. As for the .410 gauge these were made at the Ishapore Indian Rifle Factory by smooth-boring the barrels to .410-.412 diameter. These did not actually fire a .410 shell but a shell made from an unnecked .303 British cartridge.

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Camp Kearny

 

The * does not denote a Savage or Long Branch produced rifle. The * denotes a No. 4 Rifle with a simplified bolt release. Both Savage and Long Branch started production with the No.4 Mark I, then in early 1942 the simplified bolt release was introduced at both Sav. & LB and the rifle designation and markings were changed to No.4 Mark I*.

 

Most of the non US marked Savage No.4s that Brad pointed out, were No.4 Mark I with the original bolt release so were not marked with the *. The Act that put the Lend/Lease program into effect was signed into law 23 Feb 1942.

 

General rule of thumb is that only the N. American factories made the * version, however to add a bit more confusion there have been reported finds of a few Brit. manufactured No.4 Mark 1 receivers (bodies) made with the simplified bolt release and if I remember correctly WithOUT the * marking.

 

Added notes on the Bolt Release, With the N0.4 Mark I, “the bolt head release consists of a spring loaded catch behind the charger guide while on the Mark I* it consists merely of a cut-away in the rib near the front of the receiver.” The rib in this description is the one that fits a corresponding grove in right bottom edge of the bolt head.

 

Most of this information comes from Ian Skennerton.

 

45B20

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One of my former supervisors was a US Army cook in Korea. He said that he carried and shot a Lee Enfield because he loved the way it shot and there was plenty of .303 British ammo where he was. When he came back home, he gave it to another guy who also liked it. Oh, yes, one more thing; he said that while he froze his butt off, the British rifle never let him down due to the low temp (which affected the M1 carbines the cooks were issued).

GB

 

 

 

 

 

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The No.4 Mark I that were produced by Savage did have the No 4 MK I * on the receiver along with the U.S. PROPERTY , but the actual distinguishing mark is a large S on the band above the trigger guard between the S.N. and year date. The proper bayonet for these are also "S" marked. Also is marked with an S in the stock directly behind the trigger guard, the front barrel band will also have the S. The bayonet lug on the front of the barrel should also have the ordinance bomb stamping.

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I have a NO.4 MkI* also that is stamped US Property and was made by Savage Arms. It also has the Ordnance Acceptance marks from the South African Gov't.

Honorably Discharged OEF VI/VII Veteran

US Army Military Police

SGT

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Actually, a collector here in the states has serial number 0C1, the first No4MkI Savage Enfield made. The brits converted it into a sniper. It has the US Property marks on it.

 

2 weeks ago I saw SN 0C165, the 165th Savage Enfield made. It to had the US Prop stamp on it.

Enfield, anything else is is just a rifle.

(Unless it's a Garand)

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