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WWII Army Camos


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I thought these Army camouflage pieces would be difficult to find, but it was fairly easy to find the jacket. How common are these jackets and the pants?

 

A huge lot of unissued pants surfaced in France about 25 years ago...

They do turn up on Ebay regularly...

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Those British-made Sniper Suits are just too cool; gotta love that "strange" brown side!!! :w00t:

 

There was a question raised earlier about whether green buttons were applied to the HBT Jackets in wartime; below is a Jacket made by Woodbury Mills in 1943...

 

post-3226-1303923273.jpeg

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Close-up:

 

post-3226-1303923372.jpeg

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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I found pictures of another one of these jackets recently, but I think it is a repro.

 

It has a size tag with a number and an "R", as the originals should, but it does not have a gas flap. Reading earlier in this thread it sounded like the repro ones did have gas flaps, but I assume the originals did too. Is it possible one of the repro makers did not put a gas flap on theirs?

post-250-1304059444.jpg

John

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Buff: Unless I'm mistaken, that looks OK to me; the gas flaps were hated by most of the troops and removed pretty promptly. Can you see any sign that the Jacket in the photos once had one?

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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WWIIBuff,

 

I agree with Jim, the jacket looks original. The gas flap was a commonly removed item and it may have been removed on your jacket. Does the right front pocket have the remnants of a linen manufacturer's tag. If so, it is probably an original jacket. Some more overall pictures of the jacket and size tag would help.

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No question- that's the real deal, and a nice one to boot :thumbsup:

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Yes, that is a real one. Someone just carefully removed the gas flap and picked out the loose threads. If you want to read the washed out linen tag you can use a scanner to capture the image, bring it in to a digital image software application like Photoshop and adjust the levels (contrast and brightness). Sometimes this will bring back the washed out print enough to read the manufacturing information.

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Yes, that is a real one. Someone just carefully removed the gas flap and picked out the loose threads. If you want to read the washed out linen tag you can use a scanner to capture the image, bring it in to a digital image software application like Photoshop and adjust the levels (contrast and brightness). Sometimes this will bring back the washed out print enough to read the manufacturing information.

 

Thanks for the tip! Another thing that works well for reading washed or worn tags is white index cards (below).

 

post-3226-1304560370.jpeg

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Thanks for the tip! Another thing that works well for reading washed or worn tags is white index cards (below).

 

post-3226-1304560370.jpeg

 

 

 

Thanks for the information guys. I was wondering if there was a good way to read the tag, I'll try both methods.

John

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Well as the old saying goes "when it rains, it pours". All of a sudden I find myself with three of these Army HBT camouflage jackets. I bought them all in the last month, but will only keep one of them. They are all in good worn condition, but the last one is in the best shapr by far.

post-250-1305392305.jpg

John

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The last one, a medium size, but in the best shape of the three examples. Now I just need the pants, maybe I'll get lucky and find someone who needs a jacket and has an extra pair of pants to trade for. :wink2:

post-250-1305392722.jpg

John

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  • 8 years later...

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