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Jeffrey Magut

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Two superb Italian theater images. Thank for sharing them, Chuck and Al!


Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

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Between the incredible portrait photos posted by John, Chuck, Eric and Brennan, I'm surprised there are any cool shots left out there for the rest of us to find---I don't recall if I have shared this here before---a medic from the Italian campaign....

Hi Al, That's a great photo! Do you have any info on the soldier? My university sent a medical section (USAAS 559) to Italy.


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" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. "

View my website honoring the men and women of Indiana: http://indianavets.wix.com/indiana-at-war and follow my updates on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/IndianaModernAgeofWar/
Interested in US uniforms? Join the Association of American Military Uniform Collectors! http://aamuc.org/or find us on Facebook! facebook.com/AAMUC.ORG

 

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Unnamed member of US Lifesaving Service. The USSLS existed until January 28, 1915, when President Wilson signed the "Act to Create the Coast Guard" which merged merging the Life-Saving Service with the Revenue Cutter Service to create the USCG.

 

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Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

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LT. A. Gerhard was a chaplain in the 328th Infantry, 82nd Division

 

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Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

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Damn, John, you're wowing me with some insanely rare photos...

 

Like Eric, I've never seen any USSLS portrait before. The 82nd Chaplain is a given as that's my alma mater ;)

 

Here's another unusual one. This combination of collar insignia is not often seen, if ever. Note the use of both EM & officer aviation insignia. That pattern collar device with the superimposed wings is an early Aviation design which was short lived (ca.1917/18). He also wears an officer variant cap insignia.

 

-Chuck

 

Al - Your Italian Front medic was equally impressive...thanks!

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WANTED!

WWI Aero Squadron items such as insignia, uniforms & my favorite- PHOTOS! Will purchase or work out a possible trade

HIGHLY SOUGHT- Anything related to the AEF Photo Sections or 85th,258th & 278th Aero Squadrons.

To be alone, to have your life in your own hands, to use your own skill, single-handed, against the enemy. It was like the lists of the Middle Ages, the only sphere in modern warfare where a man saw his adversary and faced him in mortal combat, the only sphere where there was still chivalry and honour. If you won, it was your own bravery and skill; if you lost, it was because you had met a better man
-Cecil Lewis


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Damn, John, you're wowing me with some insanely rare photos...

 

Like Eric, I've never seen any USSLS portrait before. The 82nd Chaplain is a given as that's my alma mater ;)

 

Here's another unusual one. This combination of collar insignia is not often seen, if ever. Note the use of both EM & officer aviation insignia. That pattern collar device with the superimposed wings is an early Aviation design which was short lived (ca.1917/18). He also wears an officer variant cap insignia.

 

-Chuck

 

Al - Your Italian Front medic was equally impressive...thanks!

Enlisted men wore cut-out style branch insignia on their service caps until the introduction of the round universal EM cap badge in 1918. Do you think that it's an officer's style pin-back collar badge instead of an enlisted screw-back cap badge?

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Enlisted men wore cut-out style branch insignia on their service caps until the introduction of the round universal EM cap badge in 1918. Do you think that it's an officer's style pin-back collar badge instead of an enlisted screw-back cap badge?

 

Yes, I believe it's the typical officer pin-back insignia.

 

This seems standard for the pre-war/early war period. I have at least one other image that I date to the same time period as the one above...and both EMs have that same cut out insignia on the cap & collar. Sometime during the war & thereafter, they went to the EM screw post insignia that we're all familiar with.

 

Could this be an indication this guy was a would-be officer? I know they usually wore a thick white cap band at the crown to show they were an aviation cadet.


WANTED!

WWI Aero Squadron items such as insignia, uniforms & my favorite- PHOTOS! Will purchase or work out a possible trade

HIGHLY SOUGHT- Anything related to the AEF Photo Sections or 85th,258th & 278th Aero Squadrons.

To be alone, to have your life in your own hands, to use your own skill, single-handed, against the enemy. It was like the lists of the Middle Ages, the only sphere in modern warfare where a man saw his adversary and faced him in mortal combat, the only sphere where there was still chivalry and honour. If you won, it was your own bravery and skill; if you lost, it was because you had met a better man
-Cecil Lewis


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Since all EM wore what essentially looked like officer badges (with a screw-back) on their service caps, I suspect older, pre-collar disc, cut-out style, pin-back collar badges and officer collar badges were worn by EM, too.

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Another aviation portrait for this excellent thread...and further illustration of what I was talking about above.

 

Here's cadet Robert J. Barron. He died in 1917 while trying to rescue two other cadets that went into the water. Barron Field was named in his honor...

 

Note the collar insignia. Same configuration as my last example: both EM collar disc & that early pattern officer's aviation collar pin. Unfortunately, the cap is turned just enough that we can't see the insignia, if any at all.

 

I supposed I need to research further when the Air Service came out with that white cap band for cadets, as we now have two examples of known cadets not wearing them.

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WANTED!

WWI Aero Squadron items such as insignia, uniforms & my favorite- PHOTOS! Will purchase or work out a possible trade

HIGHLY SOUGHT- Anything related to the AEF Photo Sections or 85th,258th & 278th Aero Squadrons.

To be alone, to have your life in your own hands, to use your own skill, single-handed, against the enemy. It was like the lists of the Middle Ages, the only sphere in modern warfare where a man saw his adversary and faced him in mortal combat, the only sphere where there was still chivalry and honour. If you won, it was your own bravery and skill; if you lost, it was because you had met a better man
-Cecil Lewis


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Hi Al, That's a great photo! Do you have any info on the soldier? My university sent a medical section (USAAS 559) to Italy.

Erick---sorry, no luck---I even included it in "To Hell with the Kaiser" hoping that someone might recognize him and send me a note....

Al


AFB
"When in doubt, Go cyclical"

 

For more information on

"In a Strange Land: The American Occupation of Germany 1918-1923"

"Let's Go! The History of the 29th Infantry Division"

"To Hell with the Kaiser: America Prepares for War 1916-1918 Volumes 1 and 2"

"Desert Uniforms, Patches, and Insignia of the US Armed Forces"

"Forgotten Soldiers of WWI: America's Immigrant Doughboys"

"Play Ball! Doughboys and Baseball During the Great War"

go to

https://www.amazon.com/author/alexanderf.barnes

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Two more I have recently acquired. Unfortunately, no information on these two photos.

 

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I hope Brennan doesn't mind me posting this image from his collection. These guys, posed in the same improvised studio (same MG?), I believe, were in the 88th Division

 

 

 

Just weighing in after not checking this thread for awhile. All of the shots of MG dudes in this studio that I've see have been attributed to the 339th MG/88th Division. I wonder if this fellows grandpa was in that unit?

 

 

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wwi024.jpg?w=676

 

Identified to an Lt. Carl Wehner - KIA

 

And I was able to find a fascinating account of his death while commanding Company K following the death of his Captain (Source – Entry by RavenHawk)

 

 

…It was near St. Etienne, as his captain layed dead, Wehner led his unit forward, until he himself was struck in the head, by enemy gunfire, and killed. One account of the battle (perhaps a little exagerated), said: “Lieutenat Wehner died with three machine gun bullets in his forehead and a smile on his lips as he led Company K of the 141st Infantry over the top after his captain was killed by the fire of the enemy.”….In a letter signed by the Marshall Of France, Commander in Chief of the French Armies of the East, Petain, it was written: “Lt. Wehner displayed audacity and disregard of danger during the operations near St. Etienne. At the head of his men, encouraging them with his skill, he largely contributed to the success of the operations which made it possible to capture all objectives. He was killed at his post of combat.” For his bravery, Wehner was awarded the Croix de Guerre with palm for bravery….As for Wehner’s family, they didn’t find out until after Christmas, that Wehner had been killed, in battle…Wehner’s body was returned to Madison in 1921, and reburied at Forest Hill on 10/21/1921.

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Man, you guys are killing it! Great photos!!!

 

Here's one I've posted years ago in a different thread:

 

An American aviator posing in a Foggia, Italy studio. Note he wears Italian aviation wings instead...

 

He's also wearing the early collar insignia configuration (USR/Signal Corps). Aviators would soon replace the USR/SC collar devices with a standard "US" + a winged prop in place of the crossed signal flags.

 

Chuck,

 

Great shot! Not sure if I've seen that one before. Here's a related shot from my collection. Chuck, you were instrumental in the ID of this guy, remember? Paraphrasing my my website:

 

 

After successfully winning the photo I began the laborious process of identifying the photo. Here’s the info I was basing my research on:

1. The photo depicted a US pilot who had served at least 6 months overseas at the time the photo was taken.

2. The pilot was named Harry and had a brother named Robert.

3. The pilot had a distinctive signature and handwriting style with large crossed H’s and a penchant for flourishes.

4. The pilot was in Italy at some point during the war.

 

I started by tracking down a copy of the roster of the pilots who trained with the “Fogianni” during the war. A good friend, Chuck, was extremely gracious enough to take photos of all the pages and send them to me. I finally had the whole roster to reference. With this in hand, I identified all the Harold’s and Harry’s in the roster. This helped narrow it down to less than 30 candidates! From there I looked at the 1900 and 1910 census for each of the men in hopes of finding a brother named Robert. A small handful of candidates trickled through.

 

My first cross reference for the Harry’s with brothers named Robert brought me to Harry S. Manchester from Canfield, Ohio. The signature on his WWI draft card almost knocked me over! A perfect match. Note the intense cross on the H and the overly dramatic crosses on his T’s. With further research I was able to find a TON of information on Harry. He was indeed a pilot in Italy during the war and also served in France as a test pilot, testing new US planes as they were unloaded in France. His brother was Robert Manchester Jr. I was able to find Robert’s son (Robert Manchester III) and grandson (Robert Manchester IV) online, both prominent lawyers in the midwest.

 

harrywatermarked.jpg

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[quote name="gauthieb3sxz" post="2340172" timestamp="1496514546

 

 

Great shot! Not sure if I've seen that one before. Here's a related shot from my collection. Chuck, you were instrumental in the ID of this guy, remember? Paraphrasing my my website:

 

 

After successfully winning the photo I began the laborious process of identifying the photo. Heres the info I was basing my research on:

1. The photo depicted a US pilot who had served at least 6 months overseas at the time the photo was taken.

2. The pilot was named Harry and had a brother named Robert.

3. The pilot had a distinctive signature and handwriting style with large crossed Hs and a penchant for flourishes.

4. The pilot was in Italy at some point during the war.

 

I started by tracking down a copy of the roster of the pilots who trained with the Fogianni during the war. A good friend, Chuck, was extremely gracious enough to take photos of all the pages and send them to me. I finally had the whole roster to reference. With this in hand, I identified all the Harolds and Harrys in the roster. This helped narrow it down to less than 30 candidates! From there I looked at the 1900 and 1910 census for each of the men in hopes of finding a brother named Robert. A small handful of candidates trickled through.

 

My first cross reference for the Harrys with brothers named Robert brought me to Harry S. Manchester from Canfield, Ohio. The signature on his WWI draft card almost knocked me over! A perfect match. Note the intense cross on the H and the overly dramatic crosses on his Ts. With further research I was able to find a TON of information on Harry. He was indeed a pilot in Italy during the war and also served in France as a test pilot, testing new US planes as they were unloaded in France. His brother was Robert Manchester Jr. I was able to find Roberts son (Robert Manchester III) and grandson (Robert Manchester IV) online, both prominent lawyers in the midwest.

 

 

One go the best examples of serious research I have seen on the forum in a long time!

 

Jag


Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

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I was first attracted to this photo at the Raleigh Militaria show because the guy looked so darned old and I saw a hint of an overseas stripe on his left arm at the bottom so I included it in a batch of photos I purchased---when I got it home, I put the magnifying lens to it and as you can see, his regiment was clearly visible---

 

Company K, 31st Infantry Regiment---

 

one of the AEF units that was deployed to Siberia---

 

no wonder the guy looks so old, Russia will do that to you---plus his ribbons would indicate service in previous campaigns---anybody want to take a shot at what they are?

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AFB
"When in doubt, Go cyclical"

 

For more information on

"In a Strange Land: The American Occupation of Germany 1918-1923"

"Let's Go! The History of the 29th Infantry Division"

"To Hell with the Kaiser: America Prepares for War 1916-1918 Volumes 1 and 2"

"Desert Uniforms, Patches, and Insignia of the US Armed Forces"

"Forgotten Soldiers of WWI: America's Immigrant Doughboys"

"Play Ball! Doughboys and Baseball During the Great War"

go to

https://www.amazon.com/author/alexanderf.barnes

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I would bet it's the Philippines and Spanish Campaign Ribbons....20 years under his belt and going to Russia...No rank on the sleeve under a loupe?

 

What a fantastic image Al!


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An old friend of the family and the man that convinced me to enlist in Armor, then Lt. Neil Creighton Johnson. He retired as a Brigadier General in the 1950s.

 

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Real photo postcard signed, "Yours S. Mr. Martin, Co C. 3rd Wash. State Guard" He is armed with a Springfield .45-70 carbine.

The exclusively state-controlled Washington State Guard (WSG) was reborn during WWI. The Third Infantry Regiment consisting of 16 companies, a medical detachment, and a machine gun company all formed in the principal cities throughout Washington. The WSG, was disbanded after WWI ended.

 

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Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

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A recent portrait I picked up on eBay. I was the only bidder! 11th Aero Squadron pilot. I'm working on an ID...

 

pilot029.jpg?w=676

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Great image, Brennan (you rat! Never even saw this one for sale :) )


Top dollar paid for WWI AEF Tank Corps uniforms, medal groups, equipment and photos,
unit histories and rosters...especially anything associated with

301st (Heavy) Tank Bn
Drop me an email and let me know what you have.

 

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

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Consignment store fine: Engineer Major.

 

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Collecting the Yankee Division, 101st & 102nd Artillery specifically!

Coming to you from the birthplace of the Army National Guard, Salem, Massachusetts

 

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Post WWI wedding portrait of an Engineer Lieutenant and his wife.

 

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Collecting the Yankee Division, 101st & 102nd Artillery specifically!

Coming to you from the birthplace of the Army National Guard, Salem, Massachusetts

 

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