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45Auto

Cleaning patches.

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I have several of these packets of cleaning patches. There are no marks on any of them. As you can see each item consists of a stack of 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch flannel cleaning patches packed in a 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch brown paper envelope. Each envelope is folded over to close it. Most of the patches have stripped paterns indicating they were cut from salvaged commercial cloth, perhaps intended for bed sheets, pajamas, etc.

 

My best guess is that the packets of patches are of WWI or WWII vintage. Does anyone know for sure?

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45Auto

 

The patches in an envelope (20 per) are NOT listed in the 13 Apr 43 edition of TM 9-850. But they ARE listed in the 21 Aug 44 edition. So,, some time after mid 1943.

 

These envelopes were an issue item thru the 80s and may still be issued today.

 

I would not get too excited about the possibly of a WWII item.

 

45B20

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45Auto

 

The patches in an envelope (20 per) are NOT listed in the 13 Apr 43 edition of TM 9-850. But they ARE listed in the 21 Aug 44 edition. So,, some time after mid 1943.

 

These envelopes were an issue item thru the 80s and may still be issued today.

 

I would not get too excited about the possibly of a WWII item.

 

45B20

 

Thank you for the info from TM 9-850.

 

I'm way too old to "get to excited" about WWII items. Given the context of how I obtained these packets, and lots of other stuff with them, I think it's unlikely that they are of recent production.

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Hello!

You may be interested in looking at these individually packaged and labeled 20 pieces cleaning patches. They come from Rock Island Ordnance Depot and according to the great WWII stuff expert Bill Ricca, they were intended for long storage aboard of U.S. cargos. The waxing was intended to protect them against the humidity. The picture of the crate is not related to the "special packaging" ones, but to the patches you are speaking about. Note the 1944 date. Thanks.

Fausto

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Fausto,

 

Thank you for the images and info. I like the for export marking on the packets.

 

It appears that these packets were in "the system" and used for some time so there should be alot of them around. Although I have been collecting for many years, before I came accross this bunch I never noticed them before. I'm sure they are not worth much, but are these packets easy or hard to find?

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Quick question:

 

If the paper envloped patches stayed in the system for so long, when did the plastic bagged ones come out? Could have sworn seeing Nam era troops with the plastic rectangular packages...


Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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Hello 45Auto and Dirteater101 !

I have not a reply to your question, Dirteater101. I'm not living in the States and I don't know people used to hand these item both as a collector or as a G.I. You surely know more than me. I can only say that if the old style card envelopes (20 each) , largely used in WWII, were still in inventory during the 80's, well is it another clue that the Government never throw away anything still serviceable.

As for a collector I can only say that the oldest type of cardboard box patches (post WWII) I encountered, is the following (pictured), well dated February 1963. I have antoher package, dated November 1967: 1000 pieces bound with a string and sealed in heavy clear plastic. I have also a 1000 pieces package (pictured) dated October 1991, sealed in heavy clear plastic. More I have some 200 pieces packages, dated August 2003, again sealed in clear plastic. The older pacthes are very similar to the WWII ones: but just in white colour. The latest ones are more heavy and coarse tissue, not so soft as the older ones. Hope that this can help.

Fausto

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Thanks Fausto, All of the patches in the brown paper envelopes are made of soft flannel.

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