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Sabrejet

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  • 6 months later...

I hope this is where to post these. A few years ago a neighbor gave me these. I haven't done anything with them not being sure what they are. My neighbor told me his father was issued these as an adviser early in the VN war (1962 maybe?). My neighbor told me he had them resoled and wore them also. post-1496-0-84636900-1376947054.jpgI have seen them referred to as M-45 Tropical Combat Boots and also as "Okinawa" boots. I had a hard time getting a picture of the markings and some of the numbers are worn. They day "DA-30-28 (rest unreadable) APR. 3, 1952 NYQMPA 9R 15041" in three lines. Any ideas about them?

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  • 4 weeks later...
Hangtough506th

Thought this might be the best place to post this!

I got these a few weeks back, original Endicott & Johnson late war(?) jump boots

I've never seen any others like this because they have Endicott & Johnson stamped onto the out side of each boot plus a rough out tounge.

If anyone knows anything else about these, i.e if they are indeed war time boots please let me know as I'm eager to find out exactly what they are.

What would make me believe they are war time boots are the following:

- Beveled heel

- 12 hole

- Correct toe cap

- Russet colour (although they have been dyed black you can see where it is wearing though)

Thanks,

Ben

 

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post-109508-0-74700400-1379146462.jpg

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Hangtough506th

Managed to clear up the number abit inside and it looks like it could be the following :

 

F16014

R16014

FL6014

RL6014

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Excellent subject, guys, and a great reference as several have stated. Footwear is one of the hardest pieces of militaria to find, simply because they tend to be one of the most used and abused. Keep in mind that a lot of the soldiers of both world wars had never even owned a pair of shoes before entering the service, so when they came home, they usually brought their shoes/boots with them and wore them until they fell apart. And more than quite a few were reissued for many years after WW2. Over the years I've had several pairs of WW2-era brown jump boots and M1943 boots that had been dyed black following the changeover in leather color about 1955-56 [i remember talking to a guy years ago who was drafted about this time, and recalled being issued two pairs of brown combat boots and one bottle of black shoe dye!]

 

On the subject of M1943 boots, my father served in the US Army during the Korean War and was issued M43 boots in their original configuration. He said they had to soak the roughout bottoms in lighter fluid and set them on fire to burn the "fuzz" off, then had to spit-shine them by working numerous coats of brown shoe polish into the leather. Leave it up to the Army to issue you a pair of what amounted to suede shoes and then tell you to polish them.

 

Johan, on the 4 buckle rubber arctic overshoes with the 1934 date, I noticed they had an ECF or ECW contract number--this indicated "Emergency Conservation Work" and were procured for use by the Civilian Conservation Corps [CCC]. About 1936-37 the nomenclature was changed slightly and items procured under CCC contract had CIV in the contract number. Many of these CCC contract items were pressed into military service once the US entered the war.

 

Alan

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Johan Willaert

Johan, on the 4 buckle rubber arctic overshoes with the 1934 date, I noticed they had an ECF or ECW contract number--this indicated "Emergency Conservation Work" and were procured for use by the Civilian Conservation Corps [CCC]. About 1936-37 the nomenclature was changed slightly and items procured under CCC contract had CIV in the contract number. Many of these CCC contract items were pressed into military service once the US entered the war.

 

Alan

 

Thanks Alan!!

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  • 1 month later...

Thought this would be an approriate topic to post this online accidental find :D

 

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  • 9 months later...

I picked these up yesterday at an estate sale. Thought I would add them to the thread. Note the U. S. ARMY molded into the sole. Can anyone please help me with a value on these? Many thanks, Al.

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  • 9 months later...

How would you like to have that box of these buckle tops?

 

post-34986-0-86916000-1448387230.jpg

 

Two 2nd Div GIs in April 1951 with a brand new issue of the boots, untreated reverse uppers still, weren't they during Korea that these boots started to be made chromed, right?

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  • 4 months later...
  • 1 year later...
Johan Willaert

Another footwear related item:

 

A 1944 Duffel Bag containing 25 pairs of Service Combat Boots ( aka Double Buckle Boots) was sent to the BLUFF City Shoe Reconditioning Factory in Hannibal, Missouri for refurbishment and repair...

post-92-0-27447100-1511427267_thumb.jpg

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Another footwear related item:

 

A 1944 Duffel Bag containing 25 pairs of Service Combat Boots ( aka Double Buckle Boots) was sent to the BLUFF City Shoe Reconditioning Factory in Hannibal, Missouri for refurbishment and repair...

Nice accessory Johan! Thanks for posting.

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