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vietnam personal weapons


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this is some of my personal weapons in vietnam and some of the team weapons.

the 1919 ( 30 CAL) and the m-60 were the team weapons, the rest were mine.

more weapon pictures later.

 

 

the flag belonged to one of the team members from georgia. not mine. he flew it every where.

 

ron

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Ron, what was your preferred weapon? Were you able to carry these weapons in the field or were they just trophies? Bring any home? :nerv0003: Did ammo availability cause issues (mainly thinking the M1 carbine, the others would all be common calibers in VN)?

 

e: A lot of questions, but really neat photos!

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Ron, what was your preferred weapon? Were you able to carry these weapons in the field or were they just trophies? Bring any home? :nerv0003: Did ammo availability cause issues (mainly thinking the M1 carbine, the others would all be common calibers in VN)?

 

e: A lot of questions, but really neat photos!

.30 carbine ammo would have been very easy to obtain as I think we gave SV something like 50,000 carbines..If you look at photo's of early advisers and SF guy's that was their weapon of choice, or at least one of them.

Here is a picture from late 1964..

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"How many life's can you justify your battle hymn's". Saxon, Power and the Glory....

 

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DBA hoc1983 on ebay. Always nice stuff!

 

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Ron, what was your preferred weapon? Were you able to carry these weapons in the field or were they just trophies? Bring any home? :nerv0003: Did ammo availability cause issues (mainly thinking the M1 carbine, the others would all be common calibers in VN)?

 

e: A lot of questions, but really neat photos!

 

questions are not a problem, ask away.

 

ammo was never an issue, we had plenty, when i left vietnam i left all the weapons, ( at the time i had had enough). the weapons were all well used.

i usually carried the M79 and the pistol. the ak i got during tet and used it a few time ( when i got it it was new never fired, still had cosmolene in it, the guy that had it had 3 rounds of ammo in his pocket, he didn't need it any more).

i hardly ever used the M-16.

 

the M-1 i had was actually a M-2, i didn't see many of them over there.

 

one of the guys had a para m-1.

 

let me see if i can find a picture of him and the para. m-1

 

found it.

 

thanks for looking.

ron

 

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Great pics and first hand info! So the M1A1 carbine was as is..just fitted with the 30 round M2 mag? Looks pretty cool in that configuration!

 

Sabrejet :thumbsup:

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Great pics and first hand info! So the M1A1 carbine was as is..just fitted with the 30 round M2 mag? Looks pretty cool in that configuration!

 

Sabrejet :thumbsup:

thanks, i had a sr. moment and forgot that it was called a M1A1 carbine. para is all that came to mind at the time.

 

(2) 30 round mags taped together. i don't remember any 15 round mags being there where we were.

 

 

many time we would get re-captured U.S. weapons.

 

 

ron

 

BAR and some M-1 carbines.

the RPD's in the picture ( i think, forgetfull after 42 years) was taken by the SF guys.

one of our guys kept the BAR for a couple days and gave it to one of the SF guys. to heavy and bulky to carry. we didn't need it and they did.

 

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I used to have my little carbine dolled up with a repro M1A1 stock and two 30 round mags jungle clipped. Figured it'd be a nifty home defense setup. It's back in the M1 stock now, though. Cool pictures.

Looking for the following:

452nd and 447th Bomb Group items

Anything 12th Armored- especially uniforms

155th Assault Helicopter Company, Camp Coryell, or Ban Me Thuot Vietnam items[/center]


WWII US Navy Uniforms from the Battle Off Samar: USS Johnston DD-557, USS Hoel DD-553, USS Samuel B. Roberts DE-413, USS Heermann DD-532, USS Dennis DE-405, USS John C. Butler DE-339, USS Raymond DE-341, USS Fanshaw Bay St. Lo, White Plains, Kalinin Bay, Kitkun Bay and Gambier Bay...


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When I was going through marksmanship instruction at Edson Range on Camp Pendleton in 1965, my PMI (Primary Marksmanship Instructor) stated in his tour in RVN in 1964 he carried an M-1 Carbine and said his being an expert marksman saved his life. Apparently, the anemic 30 Carbine round which had proved inadequate in Korea against the heavily clothed NKPA and the Chicoms was better suited the much warmer climate of Indochina for terminating the enemy.

 

During my tour there 1967-1969 I saw a number of carbines being used by not only the RVN but also by American troops. Some I knew were carrying them contrary to regs.

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Here's a picture of my late father, Colonel Harold Albert, M.D., who served as a doctor in the Army Medical Corps at a Cam Ranh Bay convalescent center from 1967-68, with a personal weapon he acquired while there. (He was a Captain then)

 

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David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
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Carbine Club
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International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
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Sgt Ron:

 

Thanks for your posts. Very interesting. You guys were certainly well armed.

 

Can you tell me anything about the revolver in the photo? From here it looks like a S&W Model 15.

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

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  • 2 weeks later...
Sgt Ron:

 

Thanks for your posts. Very interesting. You guys were certainly well armed.

 

Can you tell me anything about the revolver in the photo? From here it looks like a S&W Model 15.

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

 

 

charlie,

special weapons and ammo were never a problem except when we went into the larger bases, ( they would take them away until we left).

 

that was a long time ago i don't remember if it was a S&W model 10 or model 15, i was a GOVT. issued 38 special. i do know at the time ( 67-68) that very few AF ground troops were issued the revolvers ( usually air crews were). CMT members were issued them.

 

it was not normal for AF personnel to have and use the weapons we had, but things were not normal then. we spent very little time with regular AF and more time in the field with army, marines, vietnamese troops, others. the CMT is not well know unless you were in the forward areas and then you would know who we were. ( we were not special, just had a special job to do, supply or resupply)

 

thanks for the interest.

 

ron

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While I was a Army Small Arms Repairman in Viet Nam 1967-68 I worked on the weapons carried by Air Force people assigned to Army units, usually “Dusties”,, FACs. One day while on a contact team to the 4th Inf. (IIRC) a Dusty came up to the van and ask if I would install a ’Army Type’ upper receiver (w/forward assist) on his M16. I said no problem, and in a few minutes he walked away with a ’kinda’ XM16E1. But I worried a bit and put his M16 upper away somewhere so it wouldn’t disappear. Sure enough a few days later my Warrant told me we had received a unusual radio message from a AF unit, “that I need to meet with some AF guy some place some time“. I told my Warrant what had happened and he just laughed and said go ahead, so back in the van. I knew their freq. and callsign, so when I got close, I rang them up and got their location. Sure enough, some AF ’upper’ had chewed him out for unauthorized altering of AF property. So back to a true M16 and the Dusty is happy, and I tore up the paperwork, I always did the paperwork.

 

45B20

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While were talking about carbines in VN, heres a pretty cool photo I had found. Chopped down carbine. B Company 1/50. 1970.

 

Pictures from lzbetty.com

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I like that!!! nice photos these ones

Paul Bishop

----------------

 

http://www.modernforces.com

 

MACV-SOG Living History Group

 

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."

George Orwell

 

 

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post-13427-1280196901.jpg

 

the flag belonged to one of the team members from georgia. not mine. he flew it every where.

 

ron

 

Just curious about that flag, your friend actually carried it into battle? Wouldn't that make him stand out as a target? I can understand being of Southern ancestry myself, but I would think it would be very dangerous to stick out. Thanks for all the pictures, they are very interesting!

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Just curious about that flag, your friend actually carried it into battle? Wouldn't that make him stand out as a target? I can understand being of Southern ancestry myself, but I would think it would be very dangerous to stick out. Thanks for all the pictures, they are very interesting!

 

the battle always came to us, we didn't go looking for it. there was plenty enough for us to not go hunting for it.

 

usually he had it on the front of the 2-1/2 or the jeep or on the front of his room door. we were always a target all the time and that little flag would have not made any difference. we traveled to the air field a little more than 10k every day before sunrise and back to where we lived after sunset he just thought it was funny to fly it ( his big joke), we were in SOUTH vietnam and he was always saying "the south was going to rise again", never happened. we only got hit a few times, usually early in the morning when traveling.

 

it was not really an issue with people at the time. now days everything has become an issue with people wanting to be politically correct (PC). i just don't buy th PC stuff, maybe i am just to old to care. somebody that doesn't like it then it is just tuff.

 

ron

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Thanks Ron, that makes sense. I know what you're saying about the politically correct stuff. People get touched of so easily about all kinds of things today. I honestly think that those that are so offended by the Confederate flag need to study their history more anyway.

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I encountered no shortage of "personal weapons", in I CTZ MACV, Aug 70-Jul 71.

 

My issued M-16 was kept ready for berm alert, kind of like a fire extinguisher. But then I also kept a NON-issued M-60 and M-79 handy in the same way, for use as appropriate. In my second place of assignment -- Quang Tri province adjoining the DMZ -- my M-16 mags were kept in a BAR mag belt, PLUS a bandoleer.

 

At my earlier place -- an SF camp in Quang Nam prov, WSW of Da Nang -- my assigned alert pos was with the .50 MG, so the M-16 may or may not accompanied me to the weapons pit, and my CQB item was my .45.

 

In Q Tri I often drove around alone, so carried various weapons slung across my chest, such as an M-3A1 grease gun (with lightened bolt, to shoot faster), a Swedish K M45A with 50-rd mag, a Remington (870?) riot gun, a Hungarian AMD-65 folding AKM variant, or a Polish AKMS. Plus the .45.

 

The grease gun I traded away. I stopped carrying the AKMS when the MPs were on a witch-hunt to shake out AKs to send to the Cambodians. However, the Hungarian looked so odd that if took out the mag the MPs would not recognize it as an AK. At the end of my tour, I was down to the K, and I gave to a Navy doctor when I left. The Remington I gave to my VN counterpart, for his home defense.

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