Jump to content

M1917 Gas Mask - Named 15th Engineers with Square ID Tag


KeithL

Recommended Posts

Nice mask, the lenses are still clear, the faceform looks still pliable. Does it still have the little flapper valve under the black handle. Looks like a good example, but the fact that the hose is torn free from the cannister, drops the value some. I would say that with the provenance, you could possibly get around $125. Really nice example though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice mask, the lenses are still clear, the faceform looks still pliable. Does it still have the little flapper valve under the black handle. Looks like a good example, but the fact that the hose is torn free from the cannister, drops the value some. I would say that with the provenance, you could possibly get around $125. Really nice example though.

Unfortunately the hose is cut but, it is in good shape, not rotten. The face mask is pliable.

The flapper is not present. The mouth piece and nose clips are still in place in the mask. There is a valve of some sort inside the face mask.

What is the nomenclature of this model? Is it the M1919?

Thanks,

Keith

P.S. Sorry, I thought the protective gear section was where to post this initially.

Link to post
Share on other sites
New Romantic
Unfortunately the hose is cut but, it is in good shape, not rotten. The face mask is pliable.

The flapper is not present. The mouth piece and nose clips are still in place in the mask. There is a valve of some sort inside the face mask.

What is the nomenclature of this model? Is it the M1919?

Thanks,

Keith

P.S. Sorry, I thought the protective gear section was where to post this initially.

 

The mask is the first version of the Corrected English Mask which dates to late 1917/ early 1918. The US masks of WW I never had a "M19.." nomenclature.

 

The name and address on the bag looks like the vet's son may have used it. Perhaps to carry his school books?

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is known as an SBR, or "small box respirator". It is of English design, copied by the Americans late in the war. Most doughboys were issued this as standard gear. In active areas you were required to wear this at the "ready" position on your chest and be able to don it within 6 seconds.

 

The model you have is a later version; you can tell by the black handle below the mask. It was added as a guard to protect the exhuast flapper valve. The earlier models did not have this guard. Most facemasks are very fragile nowadays; if yours is pliable that's good. It is made of rubber coated cloth.

Also the canister is not rusted through as many are today. The number "4" is a size number, if I remember correctly they were sized 1 through 4.

 

A couple good pictures can be found at http://www.gasmasks.net/database/uk/uk-003d.htm

 

My grandads WWI early-model SBR was kept at home until 2008 when my dad threw it away!!!!

He said it was "falling apart"...I really, really regret not getting it from him before then. I never imagined he would do that. Oh well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The mask is the first version of the Corrected English Mask which dates to late 1917/ early 1918. The US masks of WW I never had a "M19.." nomenclature.

 

The name and address on the bag looks like the vet's son may have used it. Perhaps to carry his school books?

I don't know when name was added to the bag but, the last name matches the dog tag. I doubt it was used for something else the mask seems to have been kept with the bag for a long time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Does it have the anti-dim can and the plaster repair kit?

No, what you see is what came with it. It would be cool if it was complete.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This is known as an SBR, or "small box respirator". It is of English design, copied by the Americans late in the war. Most doughboys were issued this as standard gear. In active areas you were required to wear this at the "ready" position on your chest and be able to don it within 6 seconds.

 

The model you have is a later version; you can tell by the black handle below the mask. It was added as a guard to protect the exhuast flapper valve. The earlier models did not have this guard. Most facemasks are very fragile nowadays; if yours is pliable that's good. It is made of rubber coated cloth.

Also the canister is not rusted through as many are today. The number "4" is a size number, if I remember correctly they were sized 1 through 4.

 

A couple good pictures can be found at http://www.gasmasks.net/database/uk/uk-003d.htm

 

My grandads WWI early-model SBR was kept at home until 2008 when my dad threw it away!!!!

He said it was "falling apart"...I really, really regret not getting it from him before then. I never imagined he would do that. Oh well.

 

Thanks for the info. The bag is almost identical to an early WW2 British bag I have so I thought this mask was based on a British design. I was guessing that we adopted British bags because of their experience and our lack of experience with gas when the US entered WW1.

 

The mask is cloth, or rubber coated cloth. The canister is in good shape but, I think it is starting to deteriorate. The paint is coming off and it sands like it has sand in it. I suppose the filter media is charcoal.

 

I feel for you about the mask. When Iwas twelve my grandfather was going to give me his Navy uniform. I was to big to wear it so turned it down. I could kick myself now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.