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Desert Shield/Storm Impression


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Tyler,

 

Looks good!! Just like what I wore there!.. A lot of us intel guys had the older bayonets. We got leftover stuff since they didn't think we would see much front line stuff.. We had green and camo chem suits. Same with ponchos.. It was kinda luck of the draw at CIF when we got those.

A lot of what I had was stuff I bought myself. The buttpack was authorized, but not issue. If you wanted to wear it, it was ok, but you had to get it yourself. I got mine off post, hence the M-61 canvas type, which I prefured over the nylon as they didn't tear out as bad. The large 1st aid kit was private purchase too. I got it to have the extras. My jungle boots were my firts purchase in AIT. I hatet the leather speed lace boots. Still do!! I had a pair of black ones and a pair of green ones. I wore the green ones in Iraq because they were cheaper to replace LOL. I got my desert ones when I got back. Didn't have any patches on my desert over there except a couple I had hand stitched them onto other than a set I had had done before we left for myself. I don't remember guys gettin stuff done waitin for the bird to come home, but then again, I was just antsy to get the hell out of there.

Odd about the mention of the black jungle boots in Somolia. I did wear them there. instead of my green ones. Of course, they weren't new by then either.. LOL I didn't get a camo cover for my flack vest until after we got back at some point. There wasn't a lot of desert camo to issue at first, so a lot of other units got it before we got stuff. I did end up with a set of early desert boots, but mine have the drains on the side. otherwise, they are like the old OD ones except for color and they are rough out.

Keep in mind tho, I wasn't a typical GI. I was counter-intel, so we had some leeway in what we used and wore, and I was a military collector, so I knew what worked and what to look for. I bought a lot of stuff privately to use so I could keep it and take it with me to my next unit. I often bought items that were organizational issue for myself too. I still have a set I wore while over there that I didn't turn in like we were supposed to do. I wore my boonie a lot. More than I did the k-pot, which I wasn't fond of.. It got me yelled at a lot too!! I got access to lots of MOPP suits, still in the bags.. I'll look for an 80's dated one for ya Tyler. May have an extra nite parka around here too.. I had a small at one time, but I don't know if I traded it off or not. I'll look.

 

Fins..

(who is feeing rather old after seeing those pics!!)

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Corpl. Cleaver

Hey old man!!

 

I like having a buttpack, if I was in at the time I probaly would have gotten one.

 

No cover on vest, check.

 

About the lack of patches. Was that because of being counter-intel or was it a personal choice not to wear them. I remember what you said about not wearing rank.

 

Cool, let me know if you find any small MOPP suits. I need the hood that goes over the mask too, not sure if that came with the suit or with the mask.

 

Tyler

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Tyler,

 

Looks good!! Just like what I wore there!.. A lot of us intel guys had the older bayonets. We got leftover stuff since they didn't think we would see much front line stuff.. We had green and camo chem suits. Same with ponchos.. It was kinda luck of the draw at CIF when we got those.

A lot of what I had was stuff I bought myself. The buttpack was authorized, but not issue. If you wanted to wear it, it was ok, but you had to get it yourself. I got mine off post, hence the M-61 canvas type, which I prefured over the nylon as they didn't tear out as bad. The large 1st aid kit was private purchase too. I got it to have the extras. My jungle boots were my firts purchase in AIT. I hatet the leather speed lace boots. Still do!! I had a pair of black ones and a pair of green ones. I wore the green ones in Iraq because they were cheaper to replace LOL. I got my desert ones when I got back. Didn't have any patches on my desert over there except a couple I had hand stitched them onto other than a set I had had done before we left for myself. I don't remember guys gettin stuff done waitin for the bird to come home, but then again, I was just antsy to get the hell out of there.

Odd about the mention of the black jungle boots in Somolia. I did wear them there. instead of my green ones. Of course, they weren't new by then either.. LOL I didn't get a camo cover for my flack vest until after we got back at some point. There wasn't a lot of desert camo to issue at first, so a lot of other units got it before we got stuff. I did end up with a set of early desert boots, but mine have the drains on the side. otherwise, they are like the old OD ones except for color and they are rough out.

Keep in mind tho, I wasn't a typical GI. I was counter-intel, so we had some leeway in what we used and wore, and I was a military collector, so I knew what worked and what to look for. I bought a lot of stuff privately to use so I could keep it and take it with me to my next unit. I often bought items that were organizational issue for myself too. I still have a set I wore while over there that I didn't turn in like we were supposed to do. I wore my boonie a lot. More than I did the k-pot, which I wasn't fond of.. It got me yelled at a lot too!! I got access to lots of MOPP suits, still in the bags.. I'll look for an 80's dated one for ya Tyler. May have an extra nite parka around here too.. I had a small at one time, but I don't know if I traded it off or not. I'll look.

 

Fins..

(who is feeing rather old after seeing those pics!!)

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Hey old man!!

 

I like having a buttpack, if I was in at the time I probaly would have gotten one.

 

No cover on vest, check.

 

About the lack of patches. Was that because of being counter-intel or was it a personal choice not to wear them. I remember what you said about not wearing rank.

 

Cool, let me know if you find any.

 

Tyler

 

Didn't have time to put any on. We got our deserts issued sterile and left before we got 'em sewn.. I was to cheap and didn't really have time to get 'em sewn there.. You shoulda said I was in the 2436th Porta-John Maint. Bn!! LOL

 

Fins...

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Corpl. Cleaver
Didn't have time to put any on. We got our deserts issued sterile and left before we got 'em sewn.. I was to cheap and didn't really have time to get 'em sewn there.. You shoulda said I was in the 2436th Porta-John Maint. Bn!! LOL

 

Fins...

 

.... you mean that was a joke? You wern't realy with the 2436th???

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOL, good times Fins.... good times

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All of the MOPP suits that I saw when we started the ground war were Woodland Camo. Maybe the tankers had the old OD MOPP suits, but everybody that I saw running around (myself included) were wearing Woodland Camo. The Saudi officers had I believe German sand camo MOPP suits, but the Saudi enlisted didn't wear any MOPP uniforms that I recall. One of the Saudis that I worked with begged me for a US Woodland Camo pattern MOPP suit. After he wore it for an hour or so, he cut the charcoal lining out of it. It was too hot and dirty for him. .......... As for the US issue desert boots, I too never saw them until we were going home. As I recall, we were all issued a brand new set of DCU's and the patches were sewn on while we waited for that "freedom bird" at King Fahad Airbase.

 

Allan

I had two woodland MOPP suits; one that I wore on the first day and a spare. I wore it for a grand total of 15 minutes and then took it off. They were brutally hot and as soon as you started sweating, the charcoal got all over your skin and clothes. I never had the need to open the spare and I just kept it in the vehicle.

 

When I was leaving the theater, no one wanted to take custody of it them so I just threw both in my foot locker and they went home with me. Back when I still played paintball in the early 1990s, I sometimes wore the used one in the winter (after washing it about 10 times in the local laundromat). Even then it got uncomfortably warm with exertion. I finally threw the open one away about 10-12 years ago. I still have the unused one, still in its sealed protective bag, in one of my storage lockers.

 

As for boots; I deployed with the older green canvas/black leather Panama sole issue boots. Around October of 1990 SOCCENT received a shipment of desert boots but didn't issue them, at least not in any quantities. By about November of 1990, the leather on the sides of my regular boots began to separate from the soles and the supply NCOs was forced to issue me a pair of desert boots. After that, they began issuing them to others and by the time of the ground war, most everyone who remained at the HQ and everyone who was going to the field had desert boots.

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Hey old man!!

 

About the lack of patches. Was that because of being counter-intel or was it a personal choice not to wear them. I remember what you said about not wearing rank.

 

Tyler

 

I know this question was not directed to me and I apologize in advance for intruding but, in SOCCENT patches were not all that common. Even an American flag was not universally worn. I had only one flag at that time and it was on a piece of Velcro so I could move it from one uniform to the other.

 

At that time, SOCCENT was not authorized a unit patch and if anyone wanted to legally wear a unit patch, it had to be the CENTCOM patch. However, there was a bundle of the unofficial SOCCENT patch going around and several guys, particularly those away from HQ, wore them (mine was also affixed with Velcro).

 

When I was with the Kuwaitis, I wore one of their "Freedom Kuwait" patches where the unit patch would have gone and no one said anything about it. As an aside, the SOCCENT patch that was eventually officially adopted some years later looked much like the unofficial one but did have some subtle color and style differences.

 

For the short period of time that I wore a helmet, it had a pair of issue dist goggles affixed to it. The problem was that the back of the goggles, where they sealed to the face, was made of a spongy foam rubber/vinyl. Between the sweat of my face and rubbing against the helmet cover when not on my face, the foam began to break down and flake off. There was nothing I could do about it over there but before I went back to Kuwait in Feb 92, I went to a sporting goods store and bought a good ski mask with both clear and tinted lenses and used that instead of the issue POS.

 

The only thing that was (mostly) universal was the leather name tag; but then several augmentees who came in later in the fall didn't have them and still wore the standard pocket tape service and name tags. By early fall of 1990 the commander of SOCCENT ordered that everyone needed to be in desert BDUs and we got in a shipment of them. But, even after that, some late arriving augmentees still wore woodland pattern into the New Year.

 

Bottom line was that nothing was an absolute, at least at SOCCENT.

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Corpl. Cleaver
For the short period of time that I wore a helmet, it had a pair of issue dist goggles affixed to it. The problem was that the back of the goggles, where they sealed to the face, was made of a spongy foam rubber/vinyl. Between the sweat of my face and rubbing against the helmet cover when not on my face, the foam began to break down and flake off. There was nothing I could do about it over there but before I went back to Kuwait in Feb 92, I went to a sporting goods store and bought a good ski mask with both clear and tinted lenses and used that instead of the issue POS.

 

wow... I guess I did get it right... whenever I put on the goggles I get a black outline on my face. lol

 

Keep the info coming guys, it all helps in 1 way or another.

 

Tyler

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I had two woodland MOPP suits; one that I wore on the first day and a spare. I wore it for a grand total of 15 minutes and then took it off. They were brutally hot and as soon as you started sweating, the charcoal got all over your skin and clothes. I never had the need to open the spare and I just kept it in the vehicle.

 

When I was leaving the theater, no one wanted to take custody of it them so I just threw both in my foot locker and they went home with me. Back when I still played paintball in the early 1990s, I sometimes wore the used one in the winter (after washing it about 10 times in the local laundromat). Even then it got uncomfortably warm with exertion. I finally threw the open one away about 10-12 years ago. I still have the unused one, still in its sealed protective bag, in one of my storage lockers.

 

As for boots; I deployed with the older green canvas/black leather Panama sole issue boots. Around October of 1990 SOCCENT received a shipment of desert boots but didn't issue them, at least not in any quantities. By about November of 1990, the leather on the sides of my regular boots began to separate from the soles and the supply NCOs was forced to issue me a pair of desert boots. After that, they began issuing them to others and by the time of the ground war, most everyone who remained at the HQ and everyone who was going to the field had desert boots.

 

You make several really good points here...

 

1. Woodland Camo mopp suits: I went over during the cease fire in late 1992... Operation Intrinsic Action 93-1. We carried our CIF issued green mopp suits with us, but were issued TWO woodland camo suits in the bag to put into our duffle bag. In my unit, A Trp 1/9th Cav, 1st Cav Div, we had the M2A2 Bradleys. Some enterprising soul took out a row of bolts on the upper armor and inserted a length of two inch wide heavy guage nylon strapping material. Our rucksacks went on one side, and out duffle bags went on the other. The two mopp suits went into the very top of your duffle bag for easy access, but you still had to have the green mopp suits handy for "training". I kept mine rolled tightly in my CVC bag, stowed behind the Squad/team leader's seat by the ramp. As you said, the activated Charcoal lining in the MOPP suits was miserable... it was bad enough the stuff sifted out of the suit as you wore and moved in it, but when it came in contact with sweat, if became like a black slurry that permanently discolored just about everything it touched... Took forever to get the rings around my neck and wrists clean after wearing them at NTC one year...

 

2. A lot of gear that is issued in theater isn't tracked that closely, which is kind of wierd... you would think it would be. I'll re-phrase that... Some gear would not be tracked as closely as other gear... The Mopp suits weren't tracked as closely as say, the BLPs... (Ballistic Laser Protective Glasses). They didnt want the mopp suits back, but dont you dare lose the BLPs... I didn't... I um... still have mine somewhere here... LOL When I was in Iraq for OIF 1 (2003-2004), we went over with the PASGT Vest... about four months from coming home, they issued the interceptor vests, and we were ordered to turn in our PASGT vests, which were then re-issued to the Iraqis being trained as police. When I got home and cleared CIF, I had one heck of a time trying to turn in the interceptor vest, as thats not what was on my clothing record.

 

3. Boots: I was issued two pair of the desert boots, which were similar to the green jungle boots only without the drain grommets in the lower insole area. They were made of tan suede leather and nylon, and had the panama sole like the jungle boots. The first issue deserts were just like the jungles with the thick nylon strapping around the top of the boot... The boots I was issued in Iraq had changed... they were a lot better made, had a little more durable sole, and had padding around the top of the boot in place of the nylon strapping. Let me dig up a pair and I'll see if I can post a picture... I know I have a pair of the more recently issued ones... I just dont know if I have the older ones.

 

4. Issue of gear: You described a problem that has permeated the army for as long as it's been in existance... The line soldier is often the last person to see newer issue gear. Down through the ages, the newer gear often was "redirected" by Headquarters troops, REMFs, and higher HQ (read "the Brass"). Special forces like the Rangers, Airborne and other select troops will be issued the better gear first... I.E. the Airborne was issued the M1943 uniform in Sept '44 for the Market Garden Jumps, but it didn't see wide spread issue till november/ december for the rest of the ETO. A more modern example would be the Goretex CFP-90 pack system... When I was in Korea with the 2nd ID in 91-92, I had to turn in my large alice ruck and got issued one of the new packs... however the rest of my career, both before and after my year in Korea, I used the large alice rucksack while seeing others issued more desirable gear.... I never even saw the Load Bearing Vest until I got to Fort Carson in 1999... even though it had been used since the late 80s/early 90s in Airborne, Ranger and special forces units. Even when I was issued the LBV, I was still issued the LC2 ammo pouches in addition to it.

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Just a note on water bottles... When I was over in Kuwait during the cease fire, ALL of the bottled water we got was of Saudi/Kuwaiti manufacture... Gulfa, Taiba, Nissa, and Rawdatain were the four I remember. The first three were of Saudi Manufacture and Rawdatain was made in Kuwait. See the picture below with me sitting in the shade with a nice, tall, (though somewhat hot) bottle of Rawdatain water. Rawdatain bottle had a squarish shape in cross section... the Gulfa, Taiba and Nissa bottles were round. We were required to drink at least four of these bottles a day, though we often drank more without being prompted. As previously stated, the water in our canteens wasn't used until we ran out of bottled water. I changed the water in my canteens out every few days... usually using it to wash up or shave.

 

In the picture you can see the desert boots (we were required to lace a dog tag into each boot) the green name tapes (embroidered... made and sewn on prior to deployment), and the Ballistic glasses. Also of note is the water bottle...

 

 

Wayne

post-3743-1277227275.jpg

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Just a note on water bottles... When I was over in Kuwait during the cease fire, ALL of the bottled water we got was of Saudi/Kuwaiti manufacture... Gulfa, Taiba, Nissa, and Rawdatain were the four I remember. The first three were of Saudi Manufacture and Rawdatain was made in Kuwait. See the picture below with me sitting in the shade with a nice, tall, (though somewhat hot) bottle of Rawdatain water. Rawdatain bottle had a squarish shape in cross section... the Gulfa, Taiba and Nissa bottles were round. We were required to drink at least four of these bottles a day, though we often drank more without being prompted. As previously stated, the water in our canteens wasn't used until we ran out of bottled water. I changed the water in my canteens out every few days... usually using it to wash up or shave.

 

In the picture you can see the desert boots (we were required to lace a dog tag into each boot) the green name tapes (embroidered... made and sewn on prior to deployment), and the Ballistic glasses. Also of note is the water bottle...

Wayne

 

I remember the Saudi mfg water bottles during DESERT SHIELD/STORM. Of course at that point we did not have any that were made in Kuwait. We used to cover them with a heavy boot sock and made a slikg with a length of 550 cord tied to the neck of the bottle and the base. When we wet the sock down, it kept the bottle slightly cooler than room temp for a while.

 

Not everyone did this (I don't recall any HQ guys doing it) but my desert boots also had a dog tag in each boot.....and they're still there. They were each affixed by running a short piece of dog tag chain through the lower eylet and through the tag. they were then tucked under the laces. they were a little incomfortable for a short while until they bent slightly to the shape of the insteps. After that, ya didn't even know they were there and the chain would keep them in place even if the laces were burned or blown off.

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I had a pair laced into mine with just the laces. I think I gave the tags to an X years ago after my green jungle boots they were in rotted.. I never carried the bottles. I drank out of my 2 qt and poured them into it. I kept my pockets full of other stuff and didn't want to carry the bottles. That was what I got the 2qt for. I had a round stone I sucked on a lot too.. Got that from one of the indian kids I ran with in Az. Keeps you from getting thirsty and helps conserve water. Any extra bottles I left stashed in the truck or hunv.

 

Fins...

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Did any of you use or saw the pistolbelt with the type of plastic buckle pictured below (clickable thumbnail)?

 

alice001q.th.jpg

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

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More words on 2-3 ADA, 1st Inf Div Mech (Hvy):

 

Our baqttalion only had the M-7 Bayonet. Although we had them, none were issued out and all were retained by the supply sections during the deployment.

 

Name tapes were quite a mix. We were each issued qty. (4) bevo style tan/spice US Army and qty (2) tan/spice ink stamped nametags. There was a shortage since some were mis-spelled and others were just outright not stamped. We (the BN S-4[supply officer] section and me as the clerk) had to obtain localy made embroidered tags to make up the name shortages. This led to almost every Soldier in the Battalion having 2 uniforms with a mixture of woven "US Army" with an embroidered "name" combination and 2 uniforms with a woven and an ink-stamp combination. Add to this, some soldiers decided on their own to have green name tags sewn on rather than the Army supplied/paid for ones. All shirts were gathered up by the Battery supply rooms with name tags and 1st Div patch enclosed into a specified pocket. The uniforms were then turned in to the Central Issue Facility (CIF) for bulk sewing. Rank was not sewn on by the Army and had to be done out-of pocket expense to the Soldier. A medic friend of mine had tan backed cloth rank (which I never knew existed). I asked him where he got it from and he said "Oh, I made it. I soaked some green backed rank in bleach for a moment and then rinsed it out!" What a cheater! :-P

 

MOPP suits were a mixture of all green and BDU print. MOPP suits were donned as the first elements of INF/AR crossed the berm and were kept on until after the cease fire went into effect.

 

I said before that tan boots were in limited availabilty during the cease-fire period. What our BN Commander made us do is that any Soldier who needed boots (for a replacement purpose only) had to personally come to the BN S-4 tent and have them personally inspected by the BN S-4 Officer to ensure a true need. If the S-4 agreed that the boots were indeed unserviceable, the Soldier's replacement pair would then be allowed to requested from 701st.

 

Tri-color desert pattern: look for a rather fascinating article by the "Quartermaster Journal" [the US Army QMC professional magazine]. It details how the choco-chips were "unintentionaly" made to blend into the American southwest. The tri-color was meant as a means to correct the bad decision/developing/procurement. The research was completed and the info was "shelved" for use at a later time. The time then came when Op Des Shield started. I first saw the tric-color as replacment uniforms for fair wear and tear purposes as we were in Saudi Arabia packing for the return home. I was only able to draw werable bits and pieces from 701st and nothing complete. Due to this mix-match problem, no-one was allowed to wear it. It aided to my overall problem in that there was only garbage sizes on replacement choco-chips as well. I failed in my mission and was forced to return with only odds and ends of both patterns and had to pass the bad news and acquired uniform items to the individual Batetry Supply Sergeants.

 

Dave

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Name tapes were quite a mix. We were each issued qty. (4) bevo style tan/spice US Army and qty (2) tan/spice ink stamped nametags. .......

 

MOPP suits were a mixture of all green and BDU print. MOPP suits were donned as the first elements of INF/AR crossed the berm and were kept on until after the cease fire went into effect. .....

 

Tri-color desert pattern: look for a rather fascinating article by the "Quartermaster Journal" [the US Army QMC professional magazine]. It details how the choco-chips were "unintentionaly" made to blend into the American southwest. The tri-color was meant as a means to correct the bad decision/developing/procurement. The research was completed and the info was "shelved" for use at a later time. The time then came when Op Des Shield started. I first saw the tric-color as replacment uniforms for fair wear and tear purposes as we were in Saudi Arabia packing for the return home. .....

 

Dave

 

SOCCENT was a bit different from the majority of commands in the Gulf War. As I mentioned, the norm was leather aircrew style name tags over the left breast pocket, affixed with Velcro. The AF 1st SOW Det was attached to SOCCENT along with COL Kraus’ Army 5th SG Group, Navy SEALs, and Brit SAS/SBS Dets and the Velcro patches were sewn on the shirts/jackets by the SOW Det life support techs. As I said earlier, some of the later arriving augmentees went through the deployment with the same standard issue Army or AF name tapes they came in with.

 

As for the Chocolate Chip pattern BDUs, I remember first seeing them in Egypt during Bright Star 82 (Oct-Dec 81). It was my understanding that the pattern was developed to match the Egyptian desert as a result of earlier exercises in the central and western Egyptian desert (but that's just my understanding). During DS/DS, the only desert BDUs we had at SOCCENT were 5-color Chocolate Chips although at some point in the winter of 1990 (before official hostilities began) SOCCENT procured a load of hip-length Gore-Tex desert pattern parkas from the US.

 

They were all 3-color pattern (non-reversible) and we wore them with the 5-color desert BDUs. The Gore-Tex came in quite handy since it rained a fair amount in the days leading up to the ground war and even during it. That was my first exposure to the 3-color "Coffee Stain" pattern....and I didn't particularly like it. By the time I went back to Kuwait as a CENTAF augmentee to SOCCENT in Feb 92, 3- and 5-color pattern were about equally represented in that command. When I deployed to Saudi Arabia in August 92 with CENTAF, we all were issued the 3-color pattern BDUs exclusively.

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Did any of you use or saw the pistolbelt with the type of plastic buckle pictured below (clickable thumbnail)?

 

alice001q.th.jpg

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

 

I had a khaki pistol belt with a khaki plastic buckle affixed to the bottom of my combat vest later on (it was privately purchased by me) but the belt I was issued at SOCCENT was the older green nylon belt with metal buckle as shown in the earlier pictures I posted.

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Corpl. Cleaver

Okay guys, I made some of the recomended changes, so here are new pics.

 

No flack jacket

Tinted lenses on goggles

Helmet band with cat eyes (named to a guy named EVANS)

Earplug case on suspenders

Taped straps

Gas mask worn propper way

Gear rearanged, so I can get 2 inches closer to the ground ;)

Watter bottles in pocket (sorry, I don't have any 20yo Iraqi water bottles)

Pistol belt with metal hardware

 

Since I rearanged my gear, I took off the bayonet, and forgot to put it back on.

 

00315.jpg00414.jpg

 

Private purchas woodland small ruck, it is realy well used, and has/had lots of sand in the bottom when I got it. Flack jacket (no cover). 2qt canteen, sleep mat.

00213.jpg

 

Early MREs(yum), dated 3/85, my brother ate them around 2001. Sowing kit, patches, random stuff. Note sun burn spray at bottom right (use by 3/91) I burn easy, so this was a must.

00513.jpg

 

Thanks for all the help guys,

Tyler

 

 

GB,

thanks for the link, I have read through that afew times.

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Robswashashore

That is a cool rig, Corp. I have to ask -- what do you keep in that

green snapped pouch you have taped to your left shoulder strap? I picked one up at the Army surplus store the other day to keep my glasses in while I'm hiking (I'm a nearsighted little old lady that has to go around with her glasses hung around her neck) and neither my husband nor I could figure out what it was really used for by young strong soldiers!

 

Best wishes!

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Corpl. Cleaver

hehehe, that is a first aid pouch. Are you sure thats what you have? I wouldn't think glasses would fit in there.

 

Tyler

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I had a khaki pistol belt with a khaki plastic buckle affixed to the bottom of my combat vest later on (it was privately purchased by me) but the belt I was issued at SOCCENT was the older green nylon belt with metal buckle as shown in the earlier pictures I posted.

 

Thanks, I'll just get a standard belt with metal buckle then. :thumbsup:

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

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i've got a question about hygiene items. Was that issue stuff or private purchase? Photos would be helpfull :D thanks a lot

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That is a cool rig, Corp. I have to ask -- what do you keep in that

green snapped pouch you have taped to your left shoulder strap? ............

 

If you look at the top pic in post #9, I have the same pouch. Mine didn't carry a compress or a compass, though. I carried the various cards of "P-tab" and other chem warfare prophylactic pills in it.

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I know it is nitpicking but shouldn't the sleeves be rolled up properly?

With the camo side covering the rolled up part.

 

Erwin

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I know it is nitpicking but shouldn't the sleeves be rolled up properly?

With the camo side covering the rolled up part.

 

Erwin

 

It depends on whether he's portraying Marine/Navy or Army/Air force. As it is, his sleeves are rolled to meet Navy/Marine regs. They're technically wrong for Army and Air Force. That said, I don't think that it mattered all that much during the actual ground war how they were rolled up.

 

Just FYI: Personally, I almost never rolled my sleeves up over there, even when it was really hot as it protected fron the windblown sand, stinging insects, and the sun.

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