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Images of MOH veterans

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Hi All,

Some images of veterans with MOH collect in internet:

Lt. Thomas R. Norris, USN

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SGM Frederick W. Gerber

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Gary Littrell

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Major Bruce P. Crandall

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John Finn

 

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Col. Lewis Millett

 

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Colonel Lewis Millett

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James E. Williams

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Thanks for sharing Ricardo!

 

Some very impressive photographs! thumbsup.gif

 

This sure made me wondering how they earned that Medal of Honor.

 

Daan

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Hi All,

Lt. Thomas R. Norris, USN



Thomas R. Norris, USN (Retired) (born 14 January 1944) is a retired a U.S. Navy SEAL awarded the Medal of Honor for his ground rescue of two downed pilots in Quang Tri Province, Vietnam on April 10-April 13, 1972. At the time of the action, Lieutenant Norris was a SEAL Advisor with the Strategic Technical Directorate Assistance Team.

Norris was one of three SEALS to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions during the Vietnam War.

Thomas Norris was born on January 14, 1944 in Jacksonville, Florida. He earned an Bachelor of Science degree in Sociology with a specialty in criminology from the University of Maryland. While at the University of Maryland, in 1965 and 1966, he was the Atlantic Coast Conference ACC wrestling champion.

He joined the Navy with hopes of flying; however, he had problems with his visual acuity and depth perception that disqualified him from becoming a pilot. He then became a Navy SEAL. Norris struggled during BUD/S training, and the instructors seriously discussed washing him out of the course. He graduated from BUD/S Class 45.

In April 1972, Norris and a Navy SEAL team effected the rescue of two downed pilots in enemy territory. For this action, he was awarded the Medal of Honor.

Six months later, in October 1972, Norris sustained a near-fatal head wound in action and was rescued by his fellow Navy SEAL, Michael Thornton.[4] As a result of the head injury, Norris was retired from the Navy. To recover from this injury, he spent three years in the hospital and underwent many major surgeries over a six year period.

Norris received the Medal of Honor from President Gerald R. Ford in a White House ceremony on March 6, 1976.

In 1979, Norris decided to join the FBI and requested a waiver for his disabilities. FBI director William Webster responded, "If you can pass the same test as anybody else applying for this organization, I will waiver your disabilities." In September 1979, Norris passed the test and subsequently served as an FBI agent for 20 years.

Tom Norris lost an eye and part of his skull during the operation in which he was rescued by Michael Thornton. Was an original member of the FBI's HRT as an assault team leader.

Medal of Honor citation

Lieutenant Thomas R. Norris
United States Naval Reserve


For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a SEAL Advisor with the Strategic Technical Directorate Assistance Team, Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. During the period 10 to 13 April 1972, Lieutenant Norris completed an unprecedented ground rescue of two downed pilots deep within heavily controlled enemy territory in Quang Tri Province. Lieutenant Norris, on the night of 10 April, led a five-man patrol through 2,000 meters of heavily controlled enemy territory, located one of the downed pilots at daybreak, and returned to the Forward Operating Base (FOB). On 11 April, after a devastating mortar and rocket attack on the small FOB, Lieutenant Norris led a three man team on two unsuccessful rescue attempts for the second pilot. On the afternoon of the 12th, a Forward Air Controller located the pilot and notified Lieutenant Norris. Dressed in fishermen disguises and using a sampan, Lieutenant Norris and one Vietnamese traveled throughout that night and found the injured pilot at dawn. Covering the pilot with bamboo and vegetation, they began the return journey, successfully evading a North Vietnamese patrol. Approaching the FOB, they came under heavy machine gun fire. Lieutenant Norris called in an air strike which provided suppression fire and a smoke screen, allowing the rescue party to reach the FOB. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, undaunted courage, and selfless dedication in the face of extreme danger, Lieutenant Norris enhanced the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Font: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_R._Norris

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Col. Lewis Millett



Lewis L. Millett (born 1920) was awarded the Medal of Honor during the Korean War for leading the last major American bayonet charge. He was born in Mechanic Falls, Maine in 1920 and was a 1949 graduate of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Millett served during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War for seven years.

Millett's official citation read: "Captain Millett distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action in the vicinity of Soam-Ni, Korea on February 7, 1951. While personally leading his company in an attack against a strongly held position he noted that the 1st platoon was pinned down by small-arms, automatic, and antitank fire. Captain Millett ordered the 3rd platoon forward, placed himself at the head of the two platoons, and, with fixed bayonet, led the assault up the fire-swept hill. In the fierce charge Capt. Millett bayoneted 2 enemy soldiers and boldly continued on, throwing grenades, clubbing and bayoneting the enemy, while urging his men forward by shouting encouragement. Despite vicious opposing fire, the whirlwind hand-to-hand assault carried to the crest of the hill. His dauntless leadership and personal courage so inspired his men that they stormed into the hostile position and used their bayonets with such lethal effect that the enemy fled in wild disorder. During this onslaught Captain Millett was wounded by grenade fragments but refused evacuation until the objective was taken and firmly secured. The superb leadership, conspicuous courage, and consummate devotion to duty demonstrated by Captain Millett were directly responsible for the successful accomplishment of a hazardous mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the heroic traditions of the military service."

Colonel (Ret.) Lewis L. Millett, one of the four surviving Maine Medal of Honor recipients, currently resides in Idyllwild, California (2005).

Font: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_L._Millett

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Major Bruce P. Crandall



Bruce P. Crandall (born 1933) is a retired U.S. Army officer who was awarded the Medal of Honor on 26 February 2007 for his heroic actions during the Battle of Ia Drang on 14 November 1965, in which he repeatedly flew an unarmed helicopter into enemy fire to bring in ammunition and supplies and evacuate the wounded. Crandall flew 22 flights that day, most of them under intense enemy fire, and a total of over 900 combat missions during the Vietnam War.

Medal of Honor citation

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty: Major Bruce P. Crandall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism as a Flight Commander in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On 14 November 1965, his flight of sixteen helicopters was lifting troops for a search and destroy mission from Plei Me, Vietnam, to Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley. On the fourth troop lift, the airlift began to take enemy fire, and by the time the aircraft had refueled and returned for the next troop lift, the enemy had Landing Zone X-Ray targeted. As Major Crandall and the first eight helicopters landed to discharge troops on his fifth troop lift, his unarmed helicopter came under such intense enemy fire that the ground commander ordered the second flight of eight aircraft to abort their mission. As Major Crandall flew back to Plei Me, his base of operations, he determined that the ground commander of the besieged infantry battalion desperately needed more ammunition. Major Crandall then decided to adjust his base of operations to Artillery Firebase Falcon in order to shorten the flight distance to deliver ammunition and evacuate wounded soldiers. While medical evacuation was not his mission, he immediately sought volunteers and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, led the two aircraft to Landing Zone X-Ray. Despite the fact that the landing zone was still under relentless enemy fire, Major Crandall landed and proceeded to supervise the loading of seriously wounded soldiers aboard his aircraft. Major Crandall's voluntary decision to land under the most extreme fire instilled in the other pilots the will and spirit to continue to land their own aircraft, and in the ground forces the realization that they would be resupplied and that friendly wounded would be promptly evacuated. This greatly enhanced morale and the will to fight at a critical time. After his first medical evacuation, Major Crandall continued to fly into and out of the landing zone throughout the day and into the evening. That day he completed a total of 22 flights, most under intense enemy fire, retiring from the battlefield only after all possible service had been rendered to the Infantry battalion. His actions provided critical resupply of ammunition and evacuation of the wounded. Major Crandall's daring acts of bravery and courage in the face of an overwhelming and determined enemy are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

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Thanks for sharing Ricardo!

 

Some very impressive photographs! thumbsup.gif

 

This sure made me wondering how they earned that Medal of Honor.

 

Daan

 

Daan,

 

Go here:

 

http://www.cmohs.org/medal.htm


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Collecting WWII Armor and Tank Destroyer Items

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THANK YOU CHRIS!!!!! w00t.gifthumbsup.gif

 

Best regards from a Friend in Brazil,

 

Ricardo.


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A better look at my good friend Col Howard's mini's.

original.

4starchrsi

 

Robert L. Howard, one of America's most decorated soldiers. He served five tours in Vietnam and is the only soldier in our nation's history to be nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor three times for three separate actions within a thirteen month period. Although it can only be awarded once to an individual, men who served with him said he deserved all three. He received a direct appointment from Master Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant in 1969, and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Richard M. Nixon at the White House in 1971.

 

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Hi,

 

OCPA-2005-03-29-154230.jpg

 

Staff Sgt. Hiroshi Myamura is shown with President Dwight Eisenhower upon receiving the Medal of Honor. Myamura, like Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith, received the medal while serving with the 3rd Infantry Division.

 

America's first secret hero: NCO's heroism earns highest award

By Col. Randy Pullen

 

Author´s note: The 3rd Infantry Division is one of the Army�s most-decorated units. Since 1917, this division has suffered some 35,000 wartime casualties. Fifty Marne Soldiers before Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith have received the nation�s highest decoration for valor, the Medal of Honor. This is the story of one.

 

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, March 29, 2005) -- Fifty years ago an Army Reserve noncommissioned officer performed an act of heroism that led to him becoming America's first secret hero.

 

Manning a hilltop position near Taejon-ni, Korea, Cpl. Hiroshi Miyamura, formerly of the Enlisted Reserve Corps, was a long way from his home in Gallup, N.M. on the night of April 24, 1951.

 

A major Chinese Communist offensive had been launched against the United Nations line. Miyamura, a machine gun squad leader in Company H, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Division, was ordered by his platoon sergeant to take 15 men -- machine gunners, riflemen and ammo carriers -- to a hill south of the Imjin River and hold the position against the advancing Chinese Communists as long as possible.

 

He did exactly that.

 

Courage under fire

 

Throughout the night, Miyamura directed the heavy and light machine guns of his squad as they held off repeated attacks by the Chinese. The combat was savage. Miyamura kept yelling at his gunners to use short bursts. He joined in with automatic fire from his carbine and threw grenades at the enemy, whose attacks were accompanied by bugles, whistles, flares and supporting mortar bursts.

 

At one critical point, he charged the enemy with his bayoneted carbine and killed ten of them in close-in-combat, breaking up the attack.

 

Finally, it was time for those Americans still alive to fall back. Miyamura slid into the heavy machine gun position and told the unwounded members of the crew and two riflemen to help the injured soldiers away; he would cover them.

 

They moved out and Miyamura was alone, waiting. Then the bugles and whistles sounded again. The Chinese were coming up the hill again.

 

Miyamura fired his machine gun until it ran out of ammunition. He then threw grenades towards the advancing Chinese. With his final grenade, he destroyed the machine gun and took off for a nearby trench, where he literally ran into a Chinese soldier.

 

Despite the surprise encounter, he shot the Chinese and wounded him. The Chinese got off a grenade, which Miyamura kicked away. It exploded, killing its thrower and wounding Miyamura in the leg.

 

As enemy soldiers poured up the hill, Miyamura tried to get away but stumbled into American barbed wire in the dark, causing him further injury. Freeing himself, Miyamura dropped into a hole playing dead while the Chinese swarmed over the area. One Chinese soldier was not fooled and he pointed a pistol at the young corporal, telling him to get up.

 

Four days later, a task force from the 3rd Division recaptured the hill. There were more than 50 dead Chinese around Miyamura's machine gun position. There was no trace of Miyamura among the dead G.I.s of his section.

 

Decorated unit

 

The man who so fiercely defended that hill joined the Army during World War II and became part of one of the most famous units in American military history, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This unit, composed entirely of Americans of Japanese Ancestry, except for some white officers, was -- for its size and length of service -- the most decorated unit in the Army. Along with the attached 100th Infantry Battalion, its members earned more than 18,000 individual decorations, to include one wartime Medal of Honor, 52 Distinguished Service Crosses, 588 Silver Stars, 5,200 Bronze Stars and more than 9,480 Purple Hearts.

 

Living recipients

 

In June 2000, twenty long overdue Medals of Honor were awarded to members of this unit. Only seven men were still living to receive their Medals. One of the living recipients was a Basic Training buddy of Miyamura's, George T. Sakato.

 

Fate decreed Miyamura would not get a chance to demonstrate his bravery during World War II. He was turned back twice from being shipped overseas to join the 442nd. The first time he was turned back was because he was not yet 19. At that time, the Army was not sending soldiers under 19 overseas. Once he was old enough, a medical officer at Fort Meade, Md., discovered he had a hernia and Miyamura was kept stateside once again. By the time the hernia had healed, the war was over.

 

While still at Fort Meade, Miyamura enlisted in the Enlisted Reserve Corps.

 

"I joined the Enlisted Reserve Corps because I thought with my training that I'd be ready to serve again if my country needed me, "Miyamura said.

 

Returning home

 

Back home in Gallup, Miyamura became an auto mechanic and married his sweetheart, Terri. When his Reserve enlistment ended, he reenlisted.

 

A year after his reenlistment, North Korea attacked south across the 38th Parallel. Like thousands of others in the Army Reserve (More than 240,000 Army Reservists were called up during the Korean War.), Miyamura was called to active duty, though he was not entirely sure he was going to a war.

 

"The Korean War was called a 'police action,'" Miyamura said, "so I thought I was going to go to Korea and be a policeman and walk around with a billy club."

 

Miyamura, who had been assigned to one famous unit, soon found himself part of two others. The 7th Infantry Regiment, whose members were known as the "Cotton Balers" for having fought under Andrew Jackson at New Orleans in 1815, was one of the regiments of the 3rd Infantry Division -- the famed "Rock of the Marne" of World War I, which had fought in Sicily, at Salerno and Anzio, in Southern France and in Germany during World War II.

 

He quickly learned that the police action was a real war. He fought with the 3rd Div. during its campaign in North Korea in late 1950 and was on the last ship to leave Hungnam when X Corps evacuated from there following the Chinese intervention. A few months later, he found himself on that hill near Taejon-ni.

 

A prisoner's ordeal

 

Taken prisoner on the morning of April 25, 1951, Miyamura survived the march to a Chinese POW camp. Though wounded, he tried to help other injured men struggling to keep up.

 

Reaching the POW camp, Miyamura and the others endured 27 months of harsh captivity. The Chinese starved the prisoners and provided no medical care for the first 12 months. It was not until the truce talks began that treatment began to improve.

 

Unknown to Miyamura and to almost everyone else, Miyamura had become a Medal of Honor recipient. His citation, dated December 12, 1951, was classified "top-secret" and filed in a security vault. Brig. Gen. Ralph Osborne, who greeted Miyamura when he was finally released, explained why Miyamura's Medal of Honor became one of America's most closely guarded secrets.

 

If the Reds knew what he had done to a good number of their soldiers just before he was taken prisoner, they might have taken revenge on this young man," Osborne said. "He might not have come back."

 

Miyamura did come back. Released on August 20, 1953, Miyamura was taken to Freedom Village near Panmunjom, where the repatriated American POWs returned to U.S. hands. The release of the POWs was big news. Those former POWs who were up to it were brought out to meet the media.

 

Miyamura, who had been promoted to sergeant while in captivity, was led out to the waiting microphones and cameras. It was then that Osborne told the reporters that the young sergeant was the greatest VIP to ever pass through Freedom Village.

 

"Sergeant Miyamura, it is my pleasure to inform you that you have been awarded the Medal of Honor," Osborne said.

 

"I've been awarded what medal?" was his stunned replied.

 

White House guest

 

On October 27, 1953, Miyamura, now wearing staff sergeant's stripes on his Class-A uniform, which also bore the proud Marne Division shoulder patch and the Combat Infantryman's Badge he had earned in Korea, went to the White House.

 

There, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, in a very open ceremony, placed the Medal of Honor around the neck of the soldier who had once been its most secret recipient.

 

Miyamura, now older and grayer but still married to his wife of almost 55 years, Terri, is as proud of his service in the Korean War as he is of his New Mexican heritage. He wonders if people today realize how horrible a war it was in terms of the American casualties suffered. He says that while Korea is often called the Forgotten War, it was never that to those who fought in it or to the family members of those who fought -- and died -- there.

 

Recently, he recalled how he went back to Korea last year. He went to the Demilitarized Zone and visited with the U.S. soldiers who stand vigil there.

 

He spoke of how impressed he was with the soldiers who serve there, of how their morale was sky high.

 

"I'm not sure I could meet the standards that Army soldiers have these days," he said.

 

Actually, the former squad leader had it turned around. As one of the Army's greatest heroes, Hiroshi Miyamura helped set the standards that today's Soldiers try to meet.

 

Font: www4.army.mil/ocpa/read.php?story_id_key=7086

 

Best regards,

 

Ricardo.


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Great post, Ricardo..............Thanks!

Bob


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"I have only two men out of my company and 20 out of some other company. We need support, but it is almost suicide to try to get it here as we are swept by machine gun fire and constant barrage is on us. I have no one on my left and only a few on my right. I will hold." (Message sent by 1st Lt. Clifton B. Cates. USMC, 96th Co., Soissons, 19 July 1918 - later 19th Commandant of the Marine Corps 1948-1952)

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Here are my good friends Benard Fisher and Hiroshi Miyamura both MOH recipients. These were taken by me and are in my possesion.

Enjoy,

4starchris



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Thanks for posting all these great pictures Ricardo and Chris. I really enjoyed watching the pictures. Please post more. thumbsup.gif

 

Eric


"Hey, bloody bucket division, our bucket, your blood."

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Forum members:

 

You are in the MEDALS & DECORATIONS "Reference Section". This area is where posts from the general Medals & Decorations "discussion section" (http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...?showforum=83) are moved for permanent retention and education about the history of the various U.S. medals and military decorations.

 

As time moves forward, some of these posts may have additional information added to them by the moderators of this section. We ask for your input as well, especially in the correction of any erroneous information that may have inadvertently be posted..

 

We encourage further comments about this post and its content. In order to do so, you will need to start a new post in the general Medals & Decorations "discussion section" (here: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind....?showforum=83). And, as needed, we will be pleased to move any new and / or valued information that is derived from your post (and subsequent comments) into this reference area as its own standing post.

 

Please be advised: posting and / or editing is restricted on this post to moderator's and forum staff.

 

Sincerely,

Chris / ADMIN


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