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Patches in action: Photos of SSI being worn by the troops.


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20 hours ago, seanmc1114 said:

Soldier on the right is wearing a 36th Infantry Division SSI with the France War Aid patch on his right sleeve. He also seems to be wearing an officer's khaki shirt.

 

"Participating in the Elks Club Bond Rally were Private Robert Borden and Technical Sergeant Odell Collins, of McCloskey Hospital. Both men are wearing their military uniforms. There are trees in the distance. Date Created: 1945-06-14"

36th Infantry Division.France Patch.jpg

 

15 hours ago, BILL THE PATCH said:

The other guy is wearing a 96th div patch with 6th army. Nice photo

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
 

If the date of the photo - June 1945 - is correct, neither the 96th nor 36th Divisions had returned to the U.S. yet. Both soldiers are wearing Purple Heart ribbons. I'm betting they were home on convalescent leave.

 

I did notice the patches worn by the soldier on the left. He is wearing a Combat Infantryman Badge as well as an Asiatic-Pacific Campaign ribbon with three campaign stars and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with two battle stars. The 96th Division was only entitled to two campaign credits - Leyte and Ryukyus (Okinawa). I'll bet the Sixth Army combat patch signifies service with the Alamo Scouts in the Philippines and that he later transferred to the 96th while it was in the Philippines then went with the 96th to Okinawa.

 

Also note the soldier on the right is wearing large Navy style ribbons and has the Legion of Merit, a medal rarely awarded to NCO's.  Maybe he served as some sort of liaison between the 36th Division and French troops during and after the invasion of Southern France.

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Hicks Field patch. I'm not sure if this is military or not.

 

"Major League Baseball players are visiting Hicks Airfield, a pilot training field near Saginaw, Texas. Left to right are Ken Sears and Alex "Red" Hayes. Mr. Sears is a left-handed hitting catcher with the New York Yankees minor league team. He is wearing a dress shirt, necktie, and a sports coat. Mr. Hayes is his former classmate at Alabama University. Mr. Hayes is dressed in his military uniform. He is the brother of Chicago White Sox infielder, Jackie Hayes.

Date Created: 1941-01-16"

Hicks Field.1941.jpg

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Not exactly a shoulder sleeve insignia. These Marine Corps recruiters appear to have the words U.S. MARINES RECRUITER directly embroidered on their uniform sleeves. October 1940. 

Marine Corps.Recruiters.1940.jpg

Marine Corps.Recruiters.1940.2.jpg

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10 hours ago, seanmc1114 said:

Not exactly a shoulder sleeve insignia. These Marine Corps recruiters appear to have the words U.S. MARINES RECRUITER directly embroidered on their uniform sleeves. October 1940. 

Marine Corps.Recruiters.1940.jpg

Marine Corps.Recruiters.1940.2.jpg

What an unusual and unorthodox method, I guess they just Picked out the lettering when they left this duty, carefully done to prevent blemishes in the fabric, would be crazy if they just through out the coat, given these were expensive private purchase items, unless recruiters got the  Blues issued, even if so, if discarded, still a waste of a perfectly fine coat and a waste of government money.

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On 8/5/2020 at 7:11 PM, patches said:

What an unusual and unorthodox method, I guess they just Picked out the lettering when they left this duty, carefully done to prevent blemishes in the fabric, would be crazy if they just through out the coat, given these were expensive private purchase items, unless recruiters got the  Blues issued, even if so, if discarded, still a waste of a perfectly fine coat and a waste of government money.

I've been looking closely at the picture, if you enlarge the picture look the the left of the letter U, I see a bdr . And I see a slight bdr going around the top arch. It's very faint. I do think they are patches not directly sewn.

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20 minutes ago, BILL THE PATCH said:

I've been looking closely at the picture, if you enlarge the picture look the the left of the letter U, I see a bdr . And I see a slight bdr going around the top arch. It's very faint. I do think they are patches not directly sewn.

I see what you're talking about, but I think it's just creases in the uniform.

Marine Corps.Recruiters.1940.3.jpg

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13 hours ago, patches said:

Brigadegeneral Jared Sembritzki Chief of Staff U.S. Army Europe wearing that unit's shoulder patch.

 

 

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And US jump wings on both uniforms as well! That's pretty cool.

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I "primarily" collect Gulf War 1 patches. All branches (USA, USAF,USN, USMC & USCG) and ALL Countries..
US - Op.'s Desert Shield / Storm / Provide Comfort /Some Southern Watch - F-4G's Wild Weasels
UK - Op.'s Granby / Sabre / Warden
Canadian - Op. Desert Storm / Op. Friction
French - Daguet / Aconit
Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, South Korea, etc.
Looking for the oddities, including unfinished & flaws
I HAVE EXTRA's!! Will trade as well.

 

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3 hours ago, easterneagle87 said:

 

And US jump wings on both uniforms as well! That's pretty cool.

Yeah I was trying to find an image of those, from here they look like there embroidered on German Camo material with a Black border, but no dice.

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On 5/27/2010 at 8:58 AM, Teamski said:

I would like to start a thread that will feature photographs of troops wearing SSI. I believe this would be a great reference for verifying patch wear and with some photos, possibly be able to show specific versions of the patches themselves. I invite other collectors to post photographs of troops wearing SSI. These can be portraits, photos in the field, etc..... Let's see them!

 

-Ski

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Captain Roger Donlon was the first Medal of Honor winner in Vietnam.  (He also was the reviewing officer for the annual parade of the 1st Junior ROTC Brigade in El Paso, TX in 1968.  Back then, JROTC was mandatory for all high school students in Texas - for at least two years.  The 1st JROTC Brigade had 11 battalions of cadets -- one for each high school in El Paso.  There was another JROTC Brigade in Ysleta, TX -- just to the south of El Paso -- which had another 10 battalions of cadets. Different times.)

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Members of the 53rd Separate Infantry Brigade wearing the Florida National SSI in photos from early 1964 issues of The Florida Guardsman. I can't pinpoint the exact date the brigade was activated, but I have found this information from the Army's Center of Military History:

 

"124th and 154th Armored Infantry Battalions consolidated 15 April 1959 to form the 124th Infantry, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System, to consist of the 1st and 2d Armored Rifle Battalions, elements of the 48th Armored Division

 

Reorganized 15 February 1963 to consist of the 1st and 2d Battalions, elements of the 53d Separate Infantry Brigade

 

Reorganized 1 March 1964 to consist of the 1st Battalion and the 2d Battalion, an element of the 53d Armored Brigade

 

Reorganized 20 January 1968 to consist of the 1st, 2d, and 3d Battalions, elements of the 53d Infantry Brigade"

 

I assume the 53rd Separate Infantry Brigade was activated in February 1953 and at some point in 1964 was converted to the 53rd Armored Brigade and that members of the brigade wore the Florida National Guard SSI until the current SSI approved for the 53rd Infantry Brigade was authorized for the 53rd Armored Brigade on December 4, 1964. 

 

53rd Armored Brigade.Florida National Guard SSI.1964.1.jpg

 

 

 

53rd Armored Brigade.Florida National Guard SSI.1964.2.jpg

 

 

53rd Armored Brigade.Florida National Guard SSI.1964.3.jpg

Florida National Guard.SSI.jpg

53rd Infantry Brigade.SSI.jpg

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45h Infantry Division swastika SSI.

 

"A member of the American National Guard, 1939. A member of the 45th Division of the National Guard removes the swastika from his uniform. The division, made up of members of the Federal States of Oklahoma, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, took over the swastika as a symbol of happiness from the Indians, but now abandoned it because of its use by the National Socialists in Germany.

 

Date taken: 4 April 1939"

45th Infantry Division.Swastika.1939.jpg

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Colonel George S. Patton IV relinquishes command of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment on April 6, 1969. At this ceremony, General Abrams presented Colonel Patton the second of two Distinguished Service Crosses he earned while serving as Blackhorse 6. Note he is wearing a full color 1st Infantry Division SSI in the pocket of his jungle fatigues. I know the 11th supported the 1st ID but also provided support to the 25th ID and 82nd Airborne Division, so this is kind of odd. Any thoughts?

11th Armored Cavalry Regiment.1st Infantry Division.Patton.DSC.jpg

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On 7/4/2013 at 10:44 AM, seanmc1114 said:

Military District Of Washington

 

post-1761-0-20457500-1372952662.jpg

On 7 Dec 1941, a Congressman from Texas introduced a motion that the flag flying over the Capitol was to be preserved - and flown over Tokyo once the U.S. had defeated them.  When Germany and Italy declared war on the United States, the motion was amended to include Rome and Berlin.  This flag was subsequently raised over Rome (on 4 July 1944), Berlin (on 25 July 1945), and Tokyo (in September 1945) - as each was occupied by the U.S. Army.  President Truman raised the flag over what later became Clay Kaserne in Berlin when he was in the city for the Potsdam Conference.


In this photo (6 Apr 1948), "men of the Third Infantry Division [should read 3rd Inf Regiment], all World War II veterans, present the flag at the Capitol Plaza, Washington, D.C. It is being accepted by Senator Arthur Vandenberg."  The flag was 'lost' for several years, but later recovered and is now in the Smithsonian. 

 

Second photo (25 Jul 1945) shows Truman, Stimson, Eisenhower, Bradley, Patton, etc. at the flag raising ceremony in Berlin.

 

Third photo (4 Jul 1944) shows the flag being raised in Rome.

 

Fourth photo (early Sept 1945) shows the 1st Cavalry Division raising the flag over the reopened US Embassy in Tokyo.  It was not the 'first US flag' raised in Tokyo after the war - that was done several days earlier (3 Sept) by LT Bud Stapleton, who was chewed out by MacArthur for upstaging his planned event.  See last image for that 'first' flag raising in Tokyo.

US flag returned to the White House in 1948.jpg

US flag being raised in Berlin July 1945.jpg

US flag being raised in Rome July 1944.jpg

US flag being raised in Tokyo September 1945.jpg

US flag being raised by LT Bud Stapleton in Tokyo on 3 Sept 1945.jpg

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