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Pearl Harbor Posthumous USN Purple Hearts


KASTAUFFER

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How times have changed the application of guidelines pertaining to the specific period of an act or wounds incurred sometimes leading to loss of life. The initial guideline for the Purple Heart during WWII was 22 September 1943. It covered the period "since 6 December 1941."

 

Today, military personnel and civilian employees of the AF and Army are justifying denials based on guidelines after the act or receiving wound(s).

 

Case in point, to determine if WWII veterans are entitled to certain awards and decorations i.e. Purple Heart and/or Combat Infantryman badge, AR 600-8-22, dated 11 December 2006, PL 104-106, dated 10 February 1996, and War Department Circulars covering the period after the acts during battles are being used to justify denials to such combatants.

 

Acts and wounds incurred during WWII met circumstances identified in guidelines participants served under. History was made and cannot be erased or ignored. Yet, WWII and Korean War veterans and/or NOK are experiencing such responses from the military.

 

ISSUE - APPICABILITY OF LATER POLICY

The identified AR 600-8-22, PL 104-106, WD Circulars 186, and 408 for AFBCMR and ABCMR in these cases purports to consider guidelines developed in analyzing after the fact. The unfairness of this consideration is obvious. If it were to be applied to all cases, it would call for the removal of Purple Hearts and/or Combat Infantryman badges from those veterans previously awarded them. In fact application of a later policy to facts surrounding a WWII event constitutes ex post facto application of law, specifically prohibited in the US

Constitution by the prohibitions in Article 1, Section 9, Clause 3, against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws. Awards and decorations, like other rights, must be considered as of the date that the benefit was earned. Application of different standards, arising out of

different sensibilities in different wars, wreaks havoc on any sense of equal application of laws. The fact that the AF and Army, recently chose to change the policy relating to Purple Hearts and CIB cannot be applied to the facts of these cases.

 

 

Robert

 

 

 

Since it is still December I thought a good way to kick off my first contributing post to this forum would be to show a few US Navy Posthumus Pearl Harbor PH's!

 

Pearl Harbor PH's are special for a number of reasons. One of them is the unique way that many are engraved. Most WWII KIA USN PH's are engraved NAME/RANK/USN or USNR for enlisted men or RANK / NAME / USN or USNR for officers . USN PH's for Pearl Harbor often have RANK and USN on the same line instead of 2 lines .

 

This example was awarded to Chief Watertender William E. Tisdale Jr. He was KIA 12/7/41 on the USS Arizona. Note his rank and USN is on the same line. His medal was issued in 1943. The USN did not authorize the posthumous award of the Purple Heart medal to anyone until 1943, which means they are retroactive in the case of Pearl Harbor casualties .

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  • 3 weeks later...
Hi Kurt,

 

I know you have seen this medal before, but thought I'd post it to this thread for those who haven't. This sailor's medal and paperwork grouping was acquired by me from his aunt, the sole surviving member of their family.

 

Harold Baker "Jack" Wood was KIA in USS Arizona on Dec. 7th, 1941.

 

Gary

 

 

This group just sold at auction for $9600 not including commission.

 

Gary B

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This group just sold at auction for $9600 not including commission.

 

Gary B

 

I always wondered when Gary's family would sell that. What auction was it in?

 

Kurt

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Jack's Son

I would like to add my contribution.......

 

Stanley H. Thomas, F3c, USS Arizona.

 

post-8213-1338182879.jpg post-8213-1338182886.jpg

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wartimecollectables.com

Richard Walter Weaver of Nevada, killed in action December 7th 1941 on the USS Arizona.

post-93-1346890642.jpg

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wartimecollectables.com

With the Anniversary of Pearl Harbor fast approaching, I would like to add one more to this thread.

Ernest Edward Speicher, Jr. was killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 serving aboard the USS West Virginia.

speicher2.jpg

speicher3.jpgspeicher4.jpg

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The entire grouping of medals his mother received from the Navy, a photo, newsclipping and a couple of "Remember Pearl Harbor" pins that were in with the medals.

 

I am the new caretaker of the Harold Wood Pearl Harbor group and feel very fortunate about that. Does not seem possible that was almost 70 years ago-I was a little guy in NJ then and remember seeing a lot of local servicemen during the war. My father took me into the city for the VJ day celebration, which was huge. Dave

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Dave,

I know the group is pictured on page 1 of this thread, but perhaps you will post an updated picture for the ease of the reader?

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  • 4 months later...

What happened to the GCM? :huh:

the GCM and other relic items you see were recovered from the wreckage of the USS Oklahoma when she was salvaged for tow back to the states. She was lost in the process. The USS Oklahoma is quite special to me. As a kid growing up in Oklahoma one of my favorite memories was seeing a massive anchor outside the Kirkpatrick center and while I was more intrigued with wanting to climb and play on it my dad told me the story of where it came from. I never played on it again but I was always in awe everytime I saw it. It was moved at one time to a park where it now sits. Great lot Robin glad you got this one.

Semper Fi

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the GCM and other relic items you see were recovered from the wreckage of the USS Oklahoma when she was salvaged for tow back to the states. She was lost in the process. The USS Oklahoma is quite special to me. As a kid growing up in Oklahoma one of my favorite memories was seeing a massive anchor outside the Kirkpatrick center and while I was more intrigued with wanting to climb and play on it my dad told me the story of where it came from. I never played on it again but I was always in awe everytime I saw it. It was moved at one time to a park where it now sits. Great lot Robin glad you got this one.

Semper Fi

Thank you, Kevin!

I have the link here for others to read if interested.......

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/173228-december-7th-1941uss-oklahoma-purple-heart/?hl=%2Bjames+%2Bcheshire

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Yankee Trader Relics

Great posts with some great shots of engravings on the back of the PH. I am trying to learn more about official and private engravings and the posts are very helpful. Thanks to all the members willing to share what they have.

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