Jump to content

US Army berets - blue, black, green, maroon, tan...


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 547
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Here's a soldier from the 4th Battalion 9th Infantry 172nd Infantry Brigade in Alaska - 1976. Black and white photos can be so frustrating at times like this. Would this be an olive drab beret?

Yep, see post # 35 and 36 here.

 

This was the flash for the 4/9th when the OD Berets were worn inthe 70s, this flash just was reinstated for wear by Charlie Airborne only in summer of 1981 when the Maroon berets were officialy adopted for Jump units. I was up there when this happened, prior to this C Co wore soft caps with the jump wing and oval that had a White center and broad Blue border with White stars, with Class A, like all Jump units (to include the 101st AbnDiv (Asslt) the old familar Garrison Cap with Para Glider cap patch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Soldiers of the 388th Transportation Company wearing full size U.S. Army Vietnam SSI on black berets in Vietnam.

Who's the old civilian? He look like a Gumba, like he just stepped out of a Pizzeria in Manhattan's Little Italy :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Army Chief Of Staff Gen. William C. Westmoreland inspecting members of Company O (Arctic Rangers) 75th Infantry in 1970. I assume those are black berets they are wearing.

Interesting that they're not wearing that O Co 75th scroll right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a series of photos of LTC Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr. while serving as Deputy Brigade Commander of the 172nd Infantry Brigade in Alaska from 1974 to 1976. Would this be an olive drab beret with black flash?

 

 

Another great batch of fotos Sean, curious as to why Schwartzkopf wear his jump wings on an oval, the oval being the one worn by the Brigades Charlie Airborne Companies. Ovals are supposed to indicate jump status units only, was HHC 172nd Inf Bde (sep) a jump status organization during those years? I'll bet the Bear knows he was there around that time in Charlie Airborne 4th of the 23rd.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another great batch of fotos Sean, curious as to why Schwartzkopf wear his jump wings on an oval, the oval being the one worn by the Brigades Charlie Airborne Companies. Ovals are supposed to indicate jump status units only, was HHC 172nd Inf Bde (sep) a jump status organization during those years? I'll bet the Bear knows he was there around that time in Charlie Airborne 4th of the 23rd.

 

Not only that, but also notice in the first picture that he's wearing an AIRBORNE tab with his 172nd patch. As deputy brigade commander, that would seem to indicate that the entire brigade was airborne, which it most definitely was not. On the other hand, I believe that is the brigade commander on the right in the third picture. He also seems to be wearing a jump oval but it doesn't look like he has an AIRBORNE tab with his 172nd patch.

 

The pictures also suggest that the olive drab beret was authorized for the entire brigade as both officers in the third picture are wearing it. Is that your understanding or was it just worn by airborne elements?

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Not only that, but also notice in the first picture that he's wearing an AIRBORNE tab with his 172nd patch. As deputy brigade commander, that would seem to indicate that the entire brigade was airborne, which it most definitely was not. On the other hand, I believe that is the brigade commander on the right in the third picture. He also seems to be wearing a jump oval but it doesn't look like he has an AIRBORNE tab with his 172nd patch.

 

The pictures also suggest that the olive drab beret was authorized for the entire brigade as both officers in the third picture are wearing it. Is that your understanding or was it just worn by airborne elements?

 

 

 

Yes the entire Brigade wore them and had differnt flashes for the sub units.

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/144792-172nd-infantry-brigade-beret-display/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another great batch of fotos Sean, curious as to why Schwartzkopf wear his jump wings on an oval, the oval being the one worn by the Brigades Charlie Airborne Companies. Ovals are supposed to indicate jump status units only, was HHC 172nd Inf Bde (sep) a jump status organization during those years? I'll bet the Bear knows he was there around that time in Charlie Airborne 4th of the 23rd.

I was in Alaska for only a short time after LTC Schwartzkopf arrived. We had not been authorized berets by the time I left in Feb. 1975. The oval was a Brigade oval and anyone on jump status with the Brigade wore the oval.

My Battalion Commander was on jump status as was the Bn. CSM but they did not wear the bloused boots in class A uniform. They did wear the oval, tab and glider patch. I would assume that the Brigade and Asst. Brigade Commander would also be on jump status but that is just my assumption. The Brigade Commander would jump with us when we made "hollywood jumps".

There were also many key people on permissive jump status (allowed to jump for proficiency, no pay), just in case the crapola hit the fan. When I was reassigned to Alaska in 1985 I was on permissive jump status.

The Brigade was organized to allow all three Airborne companies to come together as a separate Airborne Battalion Combat Team under of the command of the Assistant Brigade Commander. After we secured our objective (usually one or more airfields), we would await the arrival of the rest of the brigade and then be reattached to our parent battalion.

This scenario almost became a reality during the 1973 Yom Kippur War in Israel. The whole Brigade was put on alert but all three Airborne companies were locked down in the barracks (all personnel, officers, NCOs and troops). We had MPs guarding each company with triple strand concertina surrounding the building. We had three semi tractor trailers in the company area loaded with parachutes, ammunition and other equipment for issue. Just when we thought we were going ... we were ordered to stand down.

What a shame ... I was looking forward to fighting alongside the IDF.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Bear, re your reply, thank you. I think I understand, ie, there were certain key command and staff personel in the Brigade that were on jump status because they might be required to jump in during an operation, and that not all jump qualified personel in the Brigade would be on this special status? Is that about right?

 

Certainly when I was up there in the 4/9 we had loads of jump qualifed people other than in C Co, in my platoon alone there was several, like my platoon sergeant, the platoon leader, an on and off again squad leader I had (he was a 1965-66 Jumping Mustang 1/8thCav,1st Air Cav Div) a junior EM here and there. Didn't see the oval other than on C Co people, Bn Co and Staff included, so perhaps the practice died out by 81-82?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Patches,

Only key ranking personnel would be on actual jump status. There were two doctors who were jump qualified but not on status, but that could change quickly if the need arose. The Brigade conducted their own jump school during the summer at Rich. It was not open to anybody ... only those deemed necessary by Brigade (and used as incentive for Soldier and NCO of the Year).

Permissive jump status was only allowed for those who had Jumpmaster/Senior/ Master ratings. They were not allowed to wear oval or tab.

During the 73 Yom Kippur War, I mentioned earlier, many significant key personnel were rushed through jump refresher in preparation.

Many of the guys at Wainwright never knew of all this activity because they were far from the flagpole. They just knew that they were locked down, same as us.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in Alaska for only a short time after LTC Schwartzkopf arrived. We had not been authorized berets by the time I left in Feb. 1975. The oval was a Brigade oval and anyone on jump status with the Brigade wore the oval.

My Battalion Commander was on jump status as was the Bn. CSM but they did not wear the bloused boots in class A uniform. They did wear the oval, tab and glider patch. I would assume that the Brigade and Asst. Brigade Commander would also be on jump status but that is just my assumption. The Brigade Commander would jump with us when we made "hollywood jumps".

There were also many key people on permissive jump status (allowed to jump for proficiency, no pay), just in case the crapola hit the fan. When I was reassigned to Alaska in 1985 I was on permissive jump status.

The Brigade was organized to allow all three Airborne companies to come together as a separate Airborne Battalion Combat Team under of the command of the Assistant Brigade Commander. After we secured our objective (usually one or more airfields), we would await the arrival of the rest of the brigade and then be reattached to our parent battalion.

This scenario almost became a reality during the 1973 Yom Kippur War in Israel. The whole Brigade was put on alert but all three Airborne companies were locked down in the barracks (all personnel, officers, NCOs and troops). We had MPs guarding each company with triple strand concertina surrounding the building. We had three semi tractor trailers in the company area loaded with parachutes, ammunition and other equipment for issue. Just when we thought we were going ... we were ordered to stand down.

What a shame ... I was looking forward to fighting alongside the IDF.

Thanks for all the great info. I think your explanation pretty much accounts for everything on Schwarzkopf's uniform (beret, oval, Airborne tab).

 

I do think it's interesting that an Arctic trained unit stationed in Alaska would be put on alert for deployment to the Middle East.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the great info. I think your explanation pretty much accounts for everything on Schwarzkopf's uniform (beret, oval, Airborne tab).

 

I do think it's interesting that an Arctic trained unit stationed in Alaska would be put on alert for deployment to the Middle East.

Remembering that in 1966 the 4/9 Inf from the 171st Inf Bde (sep) and the 4/23 Inf from the 172nd Inf Bde (sep) was pulled out and sent to Hawaii and assigned to the 25th Inf Div. Todays 172nd Inf Bde has served multiple tours in Iraq, though back in my day we seemed to be South Korea focused, but no telling, the Snowhawk Brigade might of been deployed anywhere.

 

And off course fending off the Russkies if they,decided to Invade, though not sure what a chance a single Brigade along with the AKNG would of had against a Soviet Front or two :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

And off course fending off the Russkies if they,decided to Invade, though not sure what a chance a single Brigade along with the AKNG would of had against a Soviet Front or two :lol:

 

If "Comrade Ivan" did decide to invade Alaska then he would have to secure airfields for logistics hence the the brigade's use of airborne troops for securing the airfields. Russian tanks don't do well in summer muskeg (neither do ours) so they would have invade in winter. That's why the airfields are the key. The Battalions used to practice airborne assaults on airfields with the rest of the battalion being air-landed after they were secure. When I was up there the whole brigade was airmobile just like the 101st.

donation2014.gifdonation2015.gif

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres two berets I picked up not long ago & was asked to post here......I think they might be from the same soldier, same antique mall, red beret has a name in it. Any obvious reason they couldn't be from the same soldier. Thanks

 

post-123772-0-78420000-1410546291.jpg

 

 

 

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2018.gif

Deputy Curator @ http://www.themilitarymuseumofnorthflorida.com/

 

Looking for medals for the following groupings:

2nd Lt Victor P. Mangano KIA 6 Feb 1945 Engineers

Pvt First Class Ashur A. Handel KIA 14 Dec 1944 78th Div

Cmdr Bruce Nystrom KIA 2 Dec 1966

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If "Comrade Ivan" did decide to invade Alaska then he would have to secure airfields for logistics hence the the brigade's use of airborne troops for securing the airfields. Russian tanks don't do well in summer muskeg (neither do ours) so they would have invade in winter. That's why the airfields are the key. The Battalions used to practice airborne assaults on airfields with the rest of the battalion being air-landed after they were secure. When I was up there the whole brigade was airmobile just like the 101st.

The Russian Steam Roller :lol:

 

post-34986-0-81236700-1410548252.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.