Jump to content
outlook6

Paint removal from tires

Recommended Posts

Has anyone had any luck removing 60-70 year old paint from 60-70 year old tires? I've tried lacquer thinner, brake fluid, "Lift Off", "OOPS", and "Goof Off", to no avail. A power washer is too strong, it takes the rubber off with the paint. My next attempt is to use some jellied paint remover and see how this works. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated. I have four tires with a good amount of Navy grey paint that I need to remove.

 

Thanks in advance,

Jim


"You have to get at least 30 miles out of Austin before you're firmly back in Texas"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone had any luck removing 60-70 year old paint from 60-70 year old tires? I've tried lacquer thinner, brake fluid, "Lift Off", "OOPS", and "Goof Off", to no avail. A power washer is too strong, it takes the rubber off with the paint. My next attempt is to use some jellied paint remover and see how this works. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated. I have four tires with a good amount of Navy grey paint that I need to remove.

 

Thanks in advance,

Jim

 

Did you try a citrus based cleaner with those green Scotch Brite cleaning pads to scrub it? If you soak those they will do a good job of taking off paint over paint, but I have to say that the vbonding between rubber and paint has to be quite different than paint on metal. Another thing to try is a Dremel or other rotary tool with a brass brush: I use those on metal and fabric (such as web belts) with good results. I have a variable speed Dremel and always start with the slow speed. I also use Goo-Be-Gone or WD-40 (depending upon whether I'm going after paint or rust) and the rotary brush and as long as I keep everything saturated with the wet cleaner it keeps the underlying material or paint from being damaged (think of it as a form of wet sanding

 

Now of course there are some things that just seem to resist all means of eradication: I had a vintage M1 helmet that some had put a lot of masking tape on many year ago. I wanted to remove it but save the underlying paint, but nothing even made a dent in that and I ended up giving it someone who will probably just and it down to bare metal and repaint.



donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

donation2019.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you try a citrus based cleaner with those green Scotch Brite cleaning pads to scrub it?

 

Mod,

Thanks for the tip. I'll try the citrus based cleaner next. I thought of the brass wire brush wheel in a Dremel tool, but assumed it would leave brush marks in the rubber. I'll have to do a little experimenting. If find anything that works, I will post the results here.

Thanks again.

Jim


"You have to get at least 30 miles out of Austin before you're firmly back in Texas"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you suggest the same thing for removing paint from old leather? or something softer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Would you suggest the same thing for removing paint from old leather? or something softer?

 

I have to say that a slow moving brass brush works wonder on all sorts of materials: I have used it on leather when nothing else would work: as always test on a section that normally would not show. I also use the handheld brass brushes that look like toothbrushes, but the variable-speed dremels do most of the work. As for leaving marks: in some cases a few marks will look better than the paint, but generally a slow speed brush and a lot of moisture (like a liberal dose of Goo Be Gone) can do wonders without leaving marks.



donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

donation2019.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to say that a slow moving brass brush works wonder on all sorts of materials: I have used it on leather when nothing else would work: as always test on a section that normally would not show. I also use the handheld brass brushes that look like toothbrushes, but the variable-speed dremels do most of the work. As for leaving marks: in some cases a few marks will look better than the paint, but generally a slow speed brush and a lot of moisture (like a liberal dose of Goo Be Gone) can do wonders without leaving marks.

 

FS,

 

I'd agree, I just wanted to see if someone had luck with it before. Besides a nice dose of peckard, black rock or vaseline on the leather after removal will probably hide most of the marks anways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are actually products out there that are for removing paint, etc from rubber and tires. Go to your local tire shop and see if they will sell you a can as they have it there to prep rubber surfaces for patching. Never use brake cleaner as it will destroy the rubber over time.


I am looking for the following items to complete my Viet Nam helmet shells

 

- two helmet liners

(paratrooper or regular and would like WW2 to 1972)

 

-2 helmet covers

(OD or camo)

 

-2 chin strap assemblies

 

- 2 helmet bands or other interesting helmet accesories

 

 

Interested in collecting any 1901st Engineering Avaiation Battalion Items

Or items named to John H. Gallagher Jr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone had any luck removing 60-70 year old paint from 60-70 year old tires? I've tried lacquer thinner, brake fluid, "Lift Off", "OOPS", and "Goof Off", to no avail. A power washer is too strong, it takes the rubber off with the paint. My next attempt is to use some jellied paint remover and see how this works. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated. I have four tires with a good amount of Navy grey paint that I need to remove.

 

Thanks in advance,

Jim

 

 

use oil eater it works ! also clean with a little bit of acetone. these worked for me on my jeep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ended up using Savogran Strypeeze. It's a jellied paint remover I got at Lowe's. I did small areas at a time and washed off with soap and water as I finished each area. It worked relatively easily and with no damage to the tires.

Regards,

Jim


"You have to get at least 30 miles out of Austin before you're firmly back in Texas"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.