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Hi. Does anyone know where I can get a prop colt .45 to use as a holster filler?

 

Thanks.

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They sell a non-firing replica for $150 HERE


"We are now up against live, hostile targets. So if Little Red Riding Hood shows up with a Bazooka and a bad attitude, I expect you to chin the bitch!"

Sgt. Wells

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Justin, i would get myself one of the Kimar blank firers. They look great once worn and grip changed, have very slick actions and can be stripped, plus, they look 100percent real once in a holster


If you can read this, thank a teacher, and, since it's in English, thank a soldier.

- Anonymous

Dedicated to the hard core.

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i use my spring airsoft m1911 i got for $20 on shorty usa or any other airsoft website. it does the job for me and is plenty heavy.


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Looking for: Washington and Oregon Coast Artillery items

Any items related to the Harbor Defenses of the Columbia River and the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound, 1860s-WWII. This includes items from Fort Stevens, OR; Ft Canby, WA; Ft Columbia, WA; Ft Worden, WA; Ft Casey, WA; Ft Flagler, WA; Ft Ward, WA; Ft Whitman, WA; Camp Hayden, WA; and the following units that served at these forts:
Columbia River: 33rd, 34th, 93rd, and 160th Companies, CAC; and 18th and 249th Coast Artillery regiments
Puget Sound: 26th, 30th, 62nd, 63rd, 71st, 85th, 92nd, 94th, 106th, 108th, 126th, 149th, and 150th Companies, CAC; and 14th and 248th Coast Artillery regiments

Coast Defense Study Group member & site representative for the Columbia River forts

ASMIC member

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They sell a non-firing replica for $150 HERE

Hi All,

 

For a longer time I am going to buy this holster filler indicated above. Could anybody tell a little more about this replica?

 

1. Is it the same M1911 full metal repro as offered by the IMA USA company? I am asking just in case because IMA sometimes has its own gun parts and they do various compilations of non-firing replicas.

 

2. Does anyone know what Japanese company is manufacturer of the repro offered by the replicagunsswords.com?

 

3. Could you comment quality of a.m. replicas? Are they as good as slogans connected with them -- "best ever" etc.

 

Thank you very much in advance for all possible comments.

Best regards

Greg


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I found this one in a white parade holster that I got along with some VFW uniforms.

 

I saw another one somewhere that stated it was a military training tool but I have no idea if that is correct. Notice that it is a cast of a 1911 not 1911A1.

 

Cast451.jpg

Cast452.jpg

 

 

Rob

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Hello! I have one dummy .45 pistol absolutely identical to one pictured above. Mine has just a large 1 on the same place the one above has a 8. Mine was found many years ago inside a M1916 white unmarked holster fitted to a white M1936 unmarked belt. It was advertised as a U.S. Navy guard duty rig in peace time. I would think that was correct... Just curious about the 1911 style instead the more "modern" 1911A1. It would be nice to know if these were really bought by U.S. Navy, when and from what contractor...

Fausto

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Hello! I have one dummy .45 pistol absolutely identical to one pictured above. Mine has just a large 1 on the same place the one above has a 8. Mine was found many years ago inside a M1916 white unmarked holster fitted to a white M1936 unmarked belt. It was advertised as a U.S. Navy guard duty rig in peace time. I would think that was correct... Just curious about the 1911 style instead the more "modern" 1911A1. It would be nice to know if these were really bought by U.S. Navy, when and from what contractor...

Fausto

 

 

Now that you say that, that's the same story I heard about mine and it came in the same holster/belt set up as you described. I still have the set.

 

Rob

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I have a prop 1911 similar to above. Came in a holster I bought way back. Mine has all the proper markings- SN 347647. Anyone got that SN in real pistol? DSC06112.jpg,DSC06113.jpg,DSC06114.jpg.

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I found this one in a white parade holster that I got along with some VFW uniforms.

 

I saw another one somewhere that stated it was a military training tool but I have no idea if that is correct. Notice that it is a cast of a 1911 not 1911A1.

 

Cast451.jpg

Cast452.jpg

Rob

I've alway's heard these were used by the military as parade holster fillers and for other uses where they didn't need a real weapon. I have a nice one in my collection and it had the barrel somewhat distorted as these pictured here. I warmed it up a little then reshaped it and placed it immediately into cold water and it's as straight as an arrow now.


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I've alway's heard these were used by the military as parade holster fillers and for other uses where they didn't need a real weapon.

Below there is an article of 1943 from the US military press (BuAer News).

post-75-1316376908.jpg


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Below there is an article of 1943 from the US military press (BuAer News).

This is a great piece of info. This really does explain why so many of these are broken.

Pretty cool.


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I remember buying these as a kid for $1.00 - when they broke, I bought another at the surplus store!


David Little

collector of WWII 10th Mountain, Chaplain and Medical gear

Tenth Mountain Division Foundation - Secretary
Tenth Mountain Division Living History Display Group - President

National Association of the Tenth Mountain Division - Life Member
Tenth Mountain Resource Center - Board Member
Consultant to National Archives and US Army Center for Military History, film and television.

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I found this one in a white parade holster that I got along with some VFW uniforms.

Cast451.jpg

Cast452.jpg

When I was in High School Air Force Junior ROTC in the late '80s, our color guard used exactly the same sidearms.


Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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This is a great piece of info. This really does explain why so many of these are broken.

Pretty cool.

 

 

The one I posted above is cast metal.

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Well, would not you like guys to take a look at my post #6 and help me? Can you tell something more about .45 Auto replicas offered by the IMA and Replicagunsswords?

 

Regards

 

Greg


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Well, would not you like guys to take a look at my post #6 and help me? Can you tell something more about .45 Auto replicas offered by the IMA and Replicagunsswords?

 

Regards

 

Greg

Yes sorry, Greg. I have one of the IMA replica's. Several places are now selling these guns. It is a very good replica. If you want something close to the real thing but cannot fire I think this is the way to go. I have all kinds in my collection but I like these the best. I took the grips off and put regular WWII grips on. You have to drill and tap a new hole in the frame but that is easily done. With the WWII grips it makes it look better. At least to me.


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I have one of the IMA replica's. Several places are now selling these guns. It is a very good replica. If you want something close to the real thing but cannot fire I think this is the way to go. I have all kinds in my collection but I like these the best.

Thank you very much Ronnie for this information!

 

I took the grips off and put regular WWII grips on. You have to drill and tap a new hole in the frame but that is easily done. With the WWII grips it makes it look better. At least to me.

Is it known how long M1911s were manufactured with double diamond grips? Were they still issued in interwar period or early WWII? When no-diamond wood grips were manufactured for the first time for Army contract?

 

One more time thank you for information about IMA product.

Best regards

Greg


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Thank you very much Ronnie for this information!

Is it known how long M1911s were manufactured with double diamond grips? Were they still issued in interwar period or early WWII? When no-diamond wood grips were manufactured for the first time for Army contract?

 

One more time thank you for information about IMA product.

Best regards

Greg

 

The "Double Diamond" wood grips were last issued on pistols in 1919. The "no-diamond" walnut grips first were utilized in 1924 the so-called transition M1911A1's. The first plastic grips came around March 1941. Pistols that were overhauled during the period between the Wars would probably have the "no-diamond" walnut grips. If they were overhauled during WW2, they would probably have plastic grips. It is very likely that many un-overhauled M1911 with "Double Diamond grips" were issued to troops early in the War. Hope this helps.


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The "Double Diamond" wood grips were last issued on pistols in 1919. The "no-diamond" walnut grips first were utilized in 1924 the so-called transition M1911A1's. The first plastic grips came around March 1941. Pistols that were overhauled during the period between the Wars would probably have the "no-diamond" walnut grips. If they were overhauled during WW2, they would probably have plastic grips. It is very likely that many un-overhauled M1911 with "Double Diamond grips" were issued to troops early in the War. Hope this helps.

Yes, this helps! Thank you very, very much. It will be helpful info not only for me.

 

Best regards

Greg


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