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  • 4 months later...
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In early 1944, Class 44-C at Cal Aero Flight Academy was one of the first groups to conduct "Primary" training using BT-13's instead of PT-Stearmans. (Note their Civilian Flight Instructors in the front row.)

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Here's a photograph copied from a Cal Aero Flight Academy classbook depicting Squadron Four - Class 44C with Contract Flight Instructor C. L. Milhiser and his five assigned Flying Cadets standing in front of a BT-13.

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Presentation inscription on the back of C.L. Milhisner's Flight Instructor's wing. He worked at Cal Aero Flight Academy from 1942 thru 1944. Major C.C. Moseley owned and operated Cal Aero, Mira Loma and Polaris Flight Academies.

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Gilt colored Flight Instructor's wings presented to Mr. C. L. Milhiser.

 

Hi Russ,

 

Thank you for those wonderful pictures of the gilt colored civilian Flight Instructor wing badge seen in post 479 and 480. The badge in those two pictures plus the two badges attached to the two uniforms seen in post 481 and 482 pretty much confirm (for me) that it was USAAC/USAAF civilian contract pilots who were permitted to wear gold gilt pilot badges rather than Regular Army and/or Army Reserve Officer instructors. . . who (I think) because of War Department regulations were only permitted to wear Sterling Silver wings.

 

I have a question for you. The gilt colored wings seen attached to the summer weight uniform on post 481, 482. . . and below, appear to have been struck from an old die that was originally made by Wm. Link Co. back in the 1920s. Does that badge have clutch-back or pin-back fasteners, and does it have a trademark on the back?

 

Cliff

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In addition to Cliff's questions, I would also be curious to know if the above, apparent. Link-die wing has a snowflake back?

Best, John

...and on the eighth day, God created the radial engine...

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They certainly appear to be from the Link stable. They're an unmarked die-struck brass badge with applied gold wash and "C" style catch. Do you think they were produced in the early 1940's using an old Link die? Or could they have been produced in the 1920's and sold as new-old stock in the late 30's and early 40's?

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They certainly appear to be from the Link stable. They're an unmarked die-struck brass badge with applied gold wash and "C" style catch. Do you think they were produced in the early 1940's using an old Link die? Or could they have been produced in the 1920's and sold as new-old stock in the late 30's and early 40's?

Thank you Russ,

 

Oh yes, they were produced during the first half of our (USA) involvement in WW2 using the old die. I'm currently trying to obtain an identical badge with a silver finish and snowflake pattern on the back that was given to a B-17 pilot when he graduate from flying school in the first half of 1943. It has clutch-back fasteners and is what prompted my inquiry.

 

Cheers,

 

Cliff

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Here is a different take on instructors for the war effort. This patch and overseas cap is from the Frye Aircraft Company founded by Don Frye. FAC helped train the army of people needed to boost wartime production of aircraft. The Frye schools were scattered all over the West. The patch is large (7 inches across) and was worn on the back of coveralls.

 

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Private Elisha Leake, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

Sgt. Isaac Willis, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

You Are Not Forgotten

 

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A circa 1940-1941 image of the patch being worn by students:

 

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Private Elisha Leake, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

Sgt. Isaac Willis, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

You Are Not Forgotten

 

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And a circa 1940-41 photo of the cap. It looks very much like the early aviator cadet caps on page 302 of More Silver Wings Pinks and Greens (far left example).

 

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Private Elisha Leake, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

Sgt. Isaac Willis, Company G, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 11th Army Corps, KIA, Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863 Great Great Uncle

 

You Are Not Forgotten

 

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  • 3 months later...

John, you've posted some extremely rare SWA wings, patches and insignia. Thank you for sharing the great images and valuable information. Attached is an image of a period magazine advertisement supporting your comments.

Just came across this ad as well, from a 1943 issue of Flying.

John

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...and on the eighth day, God created the radial engine...

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Thank you Russ,

 

Oh yes, they were produced during the first half of our (USA) involvement in WW2 using the old die. I'm currently trying to obtain an identical badge with a silver finish and snowflake pattern on the back that was given to a B-17 pilot when he graduate from flying school in the first half of 1943. It has clutch-back fasteners and is what prompted my inquiry.

 

Cheers,

 

Cliff

Cliff, I believe this is the wing type in question, using the Link die.

Belonged to R.C. Twyman, killed during WWII.

 

John

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...and on the eighth day, God created the radial engine...

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LATEST FIND - An unusual Air Corps Military Police Badge

 

Out antiquing today and picked up the badge in attached pictures. It fits into my area of interest, as I believe it is from a pre-1942 Air Corps Training Unit. The major inscription is: A.C.P.F.S. In my opinion I think the initials stand for: AIR CORPS PRE-FLIGHT SCHOOL

 

In Googling the net I find no direct reference to an ACPFS. I solicit your thoughts and comments on a definitive ID on the badges, i.e. when and where did the school exist, its background and history, etc.

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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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