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REFERENCE POST #420

 

CHINESE AVIATION CADET INSIGNIA

 

Expanding on Chinese versus US made insignia, ahave had the attached in my collection for a long time. Top badge is a typical badge made in China. The lower badge is US made and marked NS Meyer, New York

 

Second picture is of a U S made chinese Officer's Cap Insignia

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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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John, you've posted some extremely rare SWA wings, patches and insignia. Thank you for sharing the great images and valuable information. Attached is an image of a period magazine advertisement supporting your comments.

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REFERENCE POST #412

 

Russ, to put a fine point on the "Thunderbird" shoulder sleeve insignia. The thunderbird insignia is actually the Corporate Logo for Southweat Airways. The mistake of calling it the Chinese Cadet patch or Thunderbird Field patch has been published and repeated in too many publications to enumerate. Southwest Airways was a multi-faceted operation during WW2. Besides operating three AAF Contact Pilot Training Schools, it also operated a CAA War Training Service Flying School, a Contract Air Transport route operating out of San Bernardion CA, and a depot overhaul facility.

 

Now to share some of my SWA goodies:

 

The attached picture depicts a SWA pilot wing. Besides being worn by SWA Instructor Pilots, it may have bee worn post war when SWA functioned for a short timeas an airline.

 

Also attached is an unusual octanginal shaped SSI.

 

 

I think the name "Thunderbird Field" rather than "Southwest Airways Flight Academy" has been perpetuated since the school opened in March 1941. In thumbing through some of the old class books, I saw photos entitled "Thunderbird Control Tower"; "Thunderbird Basketball Team"; "Thunderbird Instructors"; "Thunderbird Cadets Marching"; "Stearmans In Formation Over Thunderbird"; "Thunderbird At Sunrise"; "This Is Thunderbird"...

 

From cover to cover, there was only one reference to the name "Southwest Airways" and that was buried in a paragraph of small script describing the history of "Thunderbird Field". Since there was a cadre of U.S. Army Air Force Officers supervising the school, I would imagine they distanced themselves from the "Southwest Airways" connection and instead promoted an affiliation with the more macho name "Thunderbird Field". And as the years went by, the name "Thunderbird Field" just stuck.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a CPT patch and Flight School (Colboch) I haven't seen on this thread so thought I'd add it here.

The pilot, Robert B. Cromwell, attended Fullerton JC (now Cal State Fullerton University) and became one of the original Rockettes of VMTB-134. This volunteer group of 10 pilots flew the first TBFs equipped to fire aerial rockets in combat.

Later he joined VMTB-143 and went aboard the USS Gilbert Islands, CVE-107. It was one of the 4 carriers with Marine squadrons only.

 

Adam Lewis

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I agree with Russ - a very nice photo what year was it taken (if known)?

 

BTW theflight jacket looks almost unused - fantastic.

 

John

 

John, Russ,

 

Thanks for your nice comments. I don't know when Jack Moss was in CPT but can tell you he earned his pilot wings at Corpus Christi in Nov. 1943.

 

Yes, the jacket is near perfect with only a few light rust spots on one sleeve.

 

Adam

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  • 2 months later...
1920's USAS Instructor's wing

 

What makes it a USAS Instructor's wing?

 

Can anybody tell us where written documentation can be found to varify

that U. S. Army Air Service or Air Corps Instructors wore gold wings?

 

Just curious!

 

:whistling:

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What makes it a USAS Instructor's wing?

 

Can anybody tell us where written documentation can be found to varify

that U. S. Army Air Service or Air Corps Instructors wore gold wings?

 

Just curious!

 

:whistling:

 

Somewhere, I have a photograph of a WWII vintage civilian pilot instructor from one of the contract flight schools wearing a wing similar to this one as a cap badge. I will try to find it some place.

 

Patrick

 

OK found one, but not the one I was looking for--but close enough. Hard to see in this photo, but he is wearing a similar wing as B17guy's as a cap badge.

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Somewhere, I have a photograph of a WWII vintage civilian pilot instructor from one of the contract flight schools wearing a wing similar to this one as a cap badge. I will try to find it some place.

 

Patrick

 

OK found one, but not the one I was looking for--but close enough. Hard to see in this photo, but he is wearing a similar wing as B17guy's as a cap badge.

 

Thanks Patrick,

 

If anyone could pull it off you could. :thumbsup:

 

Based on what you said and the photograph you've provided, it would be true that USAAS and/or USAAC miltiary flight instructors never wore gold wings but some civilian instructor pilots under contract with the military to teach Army students how to fly did wear gold wings.

 

Glad you put that myth to rest.

 

Cliff

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  • 2 months later...

I thought that I would add something to this thread to bring it back to the top. These are two patches that I have held onto for a very long time. The Instructor showing his two students how to punch out the Nazi’s measures 5 ½”. The Red, White and Blue Air Corp patch I chased for years and finally caught up with it at the Dallas, TX gun show in the late 80’s or early 90’s. This patch came out of the Estate of the former Commanding General of Randolph Field and it measures 5 ¼”. Gregg

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I thought that I would add something to this thread to bring it back to the top. These are two patches that I have held onto for a very long time. The Instructor showing his two students how to punch out the Nazi’s measures 5 ½”. The Red, White and Blue Air Corp patch I chased for years and finally caught up with it at the Dallas, TX gun show in the late 80’s or early 90’s. This patch came out of the Estate of the former Commanding General of Randolph Field and it measures 5 ¼”. Gregg

 

 

Terrific patches Mac! Thank you for posting.

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Ok please educate me here.

 

The Air Corps (chenille) patch was used for..? As for the other patch was this used for a specific school\squadron...?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

John

Always looking for Wings & Named Air Medals!

Motto: To Collect, Preserve, and Remember!

 

 

 

 

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