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CAA/WTS/CPT/Flight Schools - Reference Thread


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  • 2 weeks later...

The two original flight schools described above shut down in 1945. With the sudden need for pilots in Korea in 1951, Southern Airways contracted again and established a flight school for the USAF in Bainbridge, Georgia. Here's the Flight Instructor's wings for that school.

Here is the cap device for the Bainbridge school.

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks guys for all of the additional postings! Here's an updated Cal Aero Flight Academy image...

 

 

Cal Aero Patches.JPG

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Kansas Raider

Here are a couple of wings from the Wentworth Military Academy. I got these at their auction in Feb 2018. The top wing is marked GEMSCO, NY

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Very cool! I had no idea these even existed.

 

My Father went to Wentworth in the late 40s-early 50s.

 

Thanks for sharing those.

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Kansas Raider

Thanks everybody for your kind remarks. Here is some history on the aviation program at Wentworth, In 1939 the government approved C.P.T. ( civilian pilot training ) course. It was held at the Lexington airport down in the bottoms. In June 1943 the program was changed to C.A.A war training service and the training is confined at the present to the Naval Aviation Cadets sent to the academy by the Navy Department. However private flying is available at the Lexington-Wentworth Airport for cadets at their own expense.

As of 1943 record of graduates from the Wentworth Flight Training out of 127 graduates, 111 are in the armed services. 4 KIA's, I missing, 1 POW.

In 1944 they secured permission fro the C.A.A. officials to continue flight training at the cadets expense.

In 1946, Wentworth is one of a few schools in the country that possesses it's own airport and conducting it's own aviation training. That year they had 29 cadets in the program. I know the program went at the least to 1970 with fewer cadets

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  • 3 weeks later...
ocsfollowme

Darr-Aero-Tech Albany, Georgia patch. 52nd AAF Flight Training Detachment Army Air Forces Southeast Training Center. 

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  • 2 months later...
On 4/4/2010 at 10:54 PM, rustywings said:

Corresponding "Instructors" patch for Air University. I believe the initials "AAFTD" stand for Army Air Forces Training Detachment.

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2 hours ago, ocsfollowme said:

What does this AU stand for this AAF Training Detachment? 

 

 

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It would seem to stand for "Army Air Forces Training Detachment".

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A couple of clarifications.  AAFTD does stand for Army Air Forces Training Detachment (AAFTD).  AAF Technical Training Command (AAFTTC) schools were AAF Technical School (AAFTS).  Civilian schools under contract to AAFTTC had AAF Training Detachments.  

 

AU is THE Aeronautical University, Chicago, Illinois.  They were contracted to train aircraft and engine mechanics.

 

Hope this clarifies things for you.

 

As a note, I need one of these patches for my personal  collection.

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rathbonemuseum.com

I purchased these unfortunately unnamed portraits of a Civilian Instructor in both his daily summer tans and his OD service uniform. Nothing features any particular field though the photographer was based in Macon GA and Tampa FL. Standard CAA insignia on both uniforms. The photo is such the collar device is absolutely undecipherable with any magnification.  

 

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rathbonemuseum.com

I thought i would post some of my civilian instructor and contract school wings. Let's start with this gold plated Beverlycraft pilot wing for a civilian instructor.

 

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rathbonemuseum.com

Next is a very common graduation wing style that seems literally painted with gold. Very thin and easily chipped.

 

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rathbonemuseum.com

Another beautiful, custom embroidered bullion civilian pilot wing. This is actually a biographical wing and belonged to Carlton Ford James. The first picture shows him wearing the wing at 23 years old. The second is Carlton at 87.39456A92-747D-4521-81AE-668E531F88FD_1_105_c.jpeg752CD878-B0B3-4C01-AE9B-80D878F36B6F_1_105_c.jpegCarltonFordJamesCI23.jpgCarltonFordJamesCI87.jpg

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rathbonemuseum.com

This is a really handsome wing that starts with a base of an American Emblem & Co standard pilot and adding this custom made flight instructor banner. This wing was originally part of the Warren Carroll collection. This is the wing that is illustrated in Jon Maguire's book "More Silver Wings, Pinks & Greens", page #333 and is similar to Russ' wing.

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rathbonemuseum.com

One of my favorites, a Desert Aero school wing based on a Noble pilot wing base. Because of the time period when these Noble wings were made, this wing is probably late 30s-pre-WWII. Desert Aero was a contract school out in Inyokern, CA,  located in the Mojave desert. The small field was called Harvey Field at the time and now is part of the China Lake Weapons Testing facilities. There is not a lot of information about the field or its owners. They tried to build a bigger school and bigger facilities but came up against funding issues and lack of support from town councils. 

 

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rathbonemuseum.com


Part of the enamel field series of wings, these two feature Shaw Field and Robbins Field.

Shaw field is located in Sumter, SC and was activated on 30 August, 1941. It was named for a Sumter native, 1st Lieutenant Ervin David Shaw, who was one of the first Americans to fly combat missions in WWI. It was both a primary and advanced school.

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rathbonemuseum.com

The second wing is from Robins Field. Robins was NE of Jackson, MS and was run by Mississippi Institute of Aeronautics, Inc. It is now Bruce Campbell Field.

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