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Best Thompson?


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Hi,

 

If I can choose between a M1928A1 and a M1A1... which should I take and why?

 

Condition is exactly the same.

 

Thanks

Chris

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Hi,

 

Thompson submachine gun Cal.45, M-1928A1 :

 

A submachine gun with a delayed blowback action, firingthe service caliber .45 ammunition.

This model has the cutts compensator at the muzzle, and a lyman ramp sight.

It wasfed by stick magazines of 20 or 30-round capacity, or by the 50-round drum magazine.

 

b49paw.jpg

 

 

Thompson submachine gun Cal.45, M1A1 :

Simplified version of the Thompson SMG adopted in 1942. Simple blowback action, fixed firing pin,

strengthened stock that could not be dismantled without a special tool.

The operating handle has been moved to the left side of the receiver. The compensator and

cooling fins on the barrel have been deleted, and the Lyman sight replaced by a simple peep

sight. This gun could only be fed by box magazines.

 

1z5q2l4.jpg

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But which one would you choose for the collecting room?

 

I only collect WW1, but thought one of these would be kinda cool....

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M1928A1

 

because it was more expensive to manufacture and had more machined parts, it was higher quality a true American classic, it's like the Cadillac of Thompsons, this is the gun that made the 1920's roar! used by famous gangsters like AL Capone, Machine Gun Kelly, Bonnie & Clyde, very nostaligic firearm.

 

*fully machined adjustable rear site housing

*cooling fins machined on barrel

*Cutts compensator

*quick detachable buttstock

*ability to use the 50 & 100 drum magazines

*nicer bolt and charging handle design [but took more time and cost to manufacture]

*nicer blued finish

 

 

the WWII version was simplified and cost less to manufacture, more stamped parts, not as fancy as the earlier model and had the rougher dull finish [phosphate / parkerized]

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that's like the "Ginger or Mary Ann" debate! :lol:

I'd take either (Thompson I mean) for a collection. But I've always preferred the wartime manufactured M1A1 as it was a wartime model. Nothing wrong with either of course but I think it boils down to a personal preference. You can't go wrong with ANY Thompson. (and forget about Mrs. Howell)

Terry

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If it were for a WW2 display then it would be the M1A1 all day long (I have one myself) but for just a wall hanger (if your local laws do not permit a live example) it would probably be the 1928A1.

 

IMHO it boils down to what it is for and what makes you the happiest.

 

Rob

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Both were used extensively during the war, so both are good as military collectibles. Both are reliable and both have vast stocks of spares to keep them running. If money is the object, then the M1A1 (my favorite and the one I own, registered full auto) is normally quite a bit less expensive than the 1928. Also, if you like the drum mag, only the '28 uses the drum. Like has been said Ginger vs Mary Ann.

Tom Bowers

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I own three, all live. The 1928A1 is the one I prefer to shoot but the M1A1s are fun too. If one is being offered to you take the 1928A1, M1A1's are much easier to find than the 1928A1. At least it is that way in the US, in the UK again, choose which ever is the harder of the two to find.

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Another thing to look at is how much money you want to spend. The 1928A1 will be more expensive than a M1/M1A1. You will have more parts to deal with on a 1928. Although it will take drums, good ones can be very expensive. Stick magazines are relatively inexpensive and easy to find. I personally prefer the M1/M1A1 version, but can only afford the semi-auto SBR that I own now. Just my .02 cents.

 

Scott

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I couldn't afford the real deal and went the semi-route myself, and it is my advice to everyone to steer clear of the new Auto-Ordnance guns. brand new, mine was 2-3 months getting it to fire more than one or two rounds without jamming or mangling the extractor. Factory ignored the info I gave them to diagnose it, didn't test fire it more than once in a row (I asked them to do this as), lost the gun, actually, until I called on the last day of the 8 week max turn around they advertise, and finally fixed the problem by sending a new bolt after calling them for a week. Original bolt was milled improperly and the extractor couldn't grab the casing and just smashed itself. Then, no more than 12 months into the new bolt, it started cracking away from the extractor. Sight threads breaking away, stock has a very slight hairline crack from the factory. They give you a one year warranty for the $1000+ price tag...

 

I took the old bolt and my dad and I milled it correctly because I do not wish to send another penny to that company (I figure over $1000 ought to buy a quality gun) and it works again. For now. Thing is, the bolt must have no heat treating as my dad commented on how soft the metal was that the end mill bit was chewing into. So they are inconsistent, and their parts are soft and break.

 

Sure don't mean to crap on a member's gun if it is your pride and joy (mine was, dreamed of it for years before I finally had enough squared away. I was so excited I couldn't even count out the last payment...) but to any looking at a Kahr-made Auto-Ordnance, my advice is pass. Mine has been a complete horror story, and I am thinking about sending the bolt that is cracking back to the factory so they can see what happens when less than 1000 rounds are fired through their overpriced pieces of...

 

If you are looking for a display piece, I'd go M1A1. If you are considering real deal FA, the M1A1 has considerable bang for the buck compared to the 28, but man, them drums is cool... and it also falls down to the theater you want to emulate with this purchase. I think more 28s made it to the Pacific, though there were plenty of M1s and M1A1s as well. Just an observation.

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Straight Shooter
Hi,

 

If I can choose between a M1928A1 and a M1A1... which should I take and why?

 

Condition is exactly the same.

 

Thanks

Chris

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Straight Shooter

I picked up a new semi-auto M1A1 about a year ago. It is a real blast to shoot. The accuracy really surprised me. So far I have not had any problems. It was definitely more economical than an original full auto. Still, a good way to start.

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Although it will take drums, good ones can be very expensive.

 

Not necessarily true now-a-days. Some of the best drums out of the box are the L-drums produced overseas. These can be had for as little as $140 and work right out of the box, full and semi auto. Unlike the "official" licensed drums that are $200+ and usually do not work. However their new produced C-drum usually work out of the box. They are a bit hit and miss, but can be had for under $500 if you look around.

 

- Ron

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Guys,

 

I believe the original poster is located in the UK. If so how these shoot is immaterial to him because their laws are not going to allow him to consider that even as an after thought.

 

Now as far as Kahr is concerned - Real friends do not allow friends to buy Kahr.

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Not necessarily true now-a-days. Some of the best drums out of the box are the L-drums produced overseas. These can be had for as little as $140 and work right out of the box, full and semi auto. Unlike the "official" licensed drums that are $200+ and usually do not work. However their new produced C-drum usually work out of the box. They are a bit hit and miss, but can be had for under $500 if you look around.

 

- Ron

 

 

Yea, I remember reading about those L drums produced overseas and that they are decent drums. I was thinking about original drum prices, sorry. I guess if the original poster is in England all of this is moot.

 

101CH47, I have heard about Kahr's "wonderful" customer service and quality control. I guess I was fortunate to get a decent M1 Thompson made by them. I wish I had 15 to 17 grand to drop on a FA Thompson, but alas I don't and have a hard time justifying spending that much money on a firearm.

 

Scott

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101CH47, I have heard about Kahr's "wonderful" customer service and quality control. I guess I was fortunate to get a decent M1 Thompson made by them. I wish I had 15 to 17 grand to drop on a FA Thompson, but alas I don't and have a hard time justifying spending that much money on a firearm.

 

Scott

 

Scott,

 

Kahr has not even been able to build a 1911 without screwing it up. I had one new out of the box that was more of a bolt action and after the third or fourth round the front sight flew off. It only took Kahr a couple of months to repair it, or I suppose I should say it only took them a few minutes to repair it and a couple of months to find out where the pistol was in their shop after they lost it.

 

It you want a full auto Thompson watch those prices, Thompson prices are dropping every day.

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Scott,

 

Kahr has not even been able to build a 1911 without screwing it up. I had one new out of the box that was more of a bolt action and after the third or fourth round the front sight flew off. It only took Kahr a couple of months to repair it, or I suppose I should say it only took them a few minutes to repair it and a couple of months to find out where the pistol was in their shop after they lost it.

 

It you want a full auto Thompson watch those prices, Thompson prices are dropping every day.

 

 

I am sorry to hear about the 1911 from them. I did like the looks of their GI issue one, but I guess will have to look elsewhere for one. As for the FA Thompson, the only way I would be able to afford one is if the idiotic 1986 ban was repealed and I could buy a new made one, and that depended on the price dropping drastically. With all the work I have done on mine I am happy with the finished product, and it is fun to shoot.

 

Scott

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I am sorry to hear about the 1911 from them. I did like the looks of their GI issue one, but I guess will have to look elsewhere for one. As for the FA Thompson, the only way I would be able to afford one is if the idiotic 1986 ban was repealed and I could buy a new made one, and that depended on the price dropping drastically. With all the work I have done on mine I am happy with the finished product, and it is fun to shoot.

 

Scott

 

I would not hold my breath for that to happen. The NRA really stabbed NFA owners in the back in 86 when they let that pass without a complaint.

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Tom @ Snake River

I have owned an Auto Ordnance M1 now for about 10 years and have been quite happy with it. I looked back, and I payed $650.00 for it.

Now working at putting a short barrel on it. Hopeing to see if a compensator is an option.

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Could be wrong with my dates, but I think AUto-Ordnance was owned by someone else then. THing is, the older guns were hit and miss too, but it is my understanding that they either work or don't work, so yours is clearly a good one.

 

I strongly suspect Kahr-owned Auto-Ordnance guns to be of deficient quality. My dad was a machinist for years, so I have reason to trust his judgment of that bolt on mine. If that company can't afford to heat treat bolts on guns that cost over $1000, they need to just plain quit. And I say this from the standpoint that I seriously HOPE that mine never breaks again, I want to like it, and I want to trust it. Just not holding my breath.

 

I have owned an Auto Ordnance M1 now for about 10 years and have been quite happy with it. I looked back, and I payed $650.00 for it.

Now working at putting a short barrel on it. Hopeing to see if a compensator is an option.

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I have one of the first Kar/ auto ord. thompsons that I purchased about 8 years ago. Not a bad gun. corners are a bit sharp, but those all wore down rather quickly. However I had to do a lot to "de-farb" their m-1927a1 to look like an M-1928. Replace the charging handle, fore grip, buttstock, buttstock mounting hardware. And the compensator is press fitted on to the long barrel. So when I SBR'ed the rifle, the gi finned barrel threaded on no problem. But that compensator had to be allen screwed in place. Either that or I pay another $75 for one of their "ok" looking compensator. I still have to do something with their selector switches, the one that is on it is an M-1 "drum and pin" style. It needs to have the paddle style....

 

Many years of being thrown around in simulated battlefields, Countless blanks and live rounds. Still going strong with only the occasional extractor being sacrificed to the ghost of John Thompson. "Lou" is on his 5 extractor....

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The West Hurley and Kahr Thompsons keep two Thompson gunsmiths in business. One is located in CO and the other in PA. The machining is crap often times to an extent requiring major reworking. Soft parts used in the guns result in problems of rapid wear and breakage.

 

Most people who own West Hurley's replace all the modern parts with WWII production AOC or Savage parts where possible.

 

If you own one of these I strongly recommend you send it to Paul Krogh at Diamond K Precision. To give you an idea of the size of the problems associated with WH and Kahr, Paul has a two year waiting period for some of the major work. Yes, there are that many screw up Thompsons made by WH and Kahr.

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And the compensator is press fitted on to the long barrel. So when I SBR'ed the rifle, the gi finned barrel threaded on no problem. But that compensator had to be allen screwed in place. Either that or I pay another $75 for one of their "ok" looking compensator.

 

 

If you used a GI finned barrel why did you not just buy a $50 original compensator and put that on the barrel?

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I fully intend to try to bootleg a new bolt if mine craps again. This company needs shut down. What are the chances that a GI bolt could be made to work in a Kahr gun? I'm betting less than 5%, but dang it'd be nice if that was the case...

 

The West Hurley and Kahr Thompsons keep two Thompson gunsmiths in business. One is located in CO and the other in PA. The machining is crap often times to an extent requiring major reworking. Soft parts used in the guns result in problems of rapid wear and breakage.

 

Most people who own West Hurley's replace all the modern parts with WWII production AOC or Savage parts where possible.

 

If you own one of these I strongly recommend you send it to Paul Krogh at Diamond K Precision. To give you an idea of the size of the problems associated with WH and Kahr, Paul has a two year waiting period for some of the major work. Yes, there are that many screw up Thompsons made by WH and Kahr.

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